Florian CÔTÉ

CÔTÉ, Florian

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Richelieu (Quebec)
Birth Date
May 17, 1929
Deceased Date
January 29, 2002
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florian_Côté
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ff46e17c-284f-4404-b9f0-223f67a6addd&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

September 19, 1966 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Nicolet--Yamaska (Quebec)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Richelieu (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture (August 30, 1968 - September 30, 1970)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
LIB
  Richelieu (Quebec)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Richelieu (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 18 of 18)


May 9, 1967

Mr. Cote (Nicolet-Yamaska):

I should not want to overlook a certain part in the speech from the throne, the one about our relations with foreign countries. In fact, I am happy to note that in the field of diplomacy, Canada will stress its efforts, particularly through the United Nations, to promote world peace. That long-sought peace, we have experienced it, so to speak, on the opening day of Expo 67 when everybody rejoiced.

At the Place des Nations, after the usual speeches and the official opening by His Excellency the Governor General, as every country taking part in this great world event was named, we could see floating in the blue sky the flag symbolizing its pride. All participating countries were named. The last one was ours, and our flag, the flag of all Canadians was raised to the sound of cheers. Then a complete silence ensued. Perhaps everyone present was meditating on his participation in that world event. And this joy through which we have lived, Mr. Speaker, we owe it to a great Canadian, the hon. Prime Minister of Canada.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY. MOVED BY MR. DON JAMIESON AND SECONDED BY MR. FLORIAN COTE
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May 9, 1967

Mr. Cote (Nicolet-Yamaska):

I would like it to be understood on both sides of the house that if we of the government party, who administer the business of Canada, are responsible for deciding that such or such a thing must be done, then we must also decide where the money will come from. We must also ask ourselves what will be the repercussions of this or that step we will take. It is not for us only a matter of saying: We must do this. No, we must administer and to administer means to anticipate.

When I think that the farm income has increased in the past three years and a half and reading over the speech from the throne, I have no hesitation in visiting every part of our rural areas, because farmers are aware of what the government has done for them.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY. MOVED BY MR. DON JAMIESON AND SECONDED BY MR. FLORIAN COTE
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March 15, 1967

Mr. Florian Cote (Nicolei-Yamaska):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to put a question to the Minister of Agriculture. Has he received a request from the Catholic Farmers Union and some members of parliament to increase the price of milk to $5.10 per hundredweight -which price I find quite logical-and, if so, what action does the government intend to take?

March 15, 1967

Inquiries of the Ministry

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   QUEBEC-REQUEST FOR INCREASE IN MILK PRICE
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October 7, 1966

Mr. Cote (Nicolet-Yamaska):

For several years, within my professional organization, I worked to see such a policy, such a measure implemented, as well as various policies about which I spoke during my election campaign, with regard to dairy farming and unemployment insurance.

But, in my opinion, the matter under consideration was the most important because as a farmer, and consequently as a buyer of feed grain from the western provinces, I suffered from those injustices in the handling of grain.

I suffered from the competition from feed producers because I was a director of a cooperative and I had, under the principles agreed to when the cooperative was created, to help those who had put their trust in me and buy grain accepted by the inspectors. Besides, at the same time, the feed producers had the chance to buy grain which had been rejected on the one hand, and which through another channel came into the hands of those who could compete with us. In his speech yesterday, the hon. member for Megantic (Mr. Langlois) dealt with a situation which can be applied to these grains-I followed his speech very closely and he was right to denounce the discrimination going on; I myself have been a victim of such discrimination.

Canadian Livestock. Feed Board

The grain had been rejected because it did not fully comply with the provisions of the act; in other words, instead of an 11 per cent content in proteins, the grain contained nonnutritive elements. Their protein content had been reduced to 8 or 9 per cent. An independent dealer had the opportunity to buy such grain of a somewhat lower quality and to mix it with some other products containing protein and thus increase the protein content of the grain, since the act authorizes the feed producer to add from 14 to 16 per cent of protein. Such tamperings are not too honest for you are still left with a percentage or a volume of non-digestible matter which cannot be digested by the animal, so that the value of this animal, when transformed into meat or milk, is not such that the buyer has his money's worth.

Mr. Speaker, fears expressed since yesterday are perhaps not too well founded. I have read the bill and it contains exactly what my professional association, the UCC, has been asking the government for years, and it is toward that end that we, in eastern Canada, have been working for so long at UCC's general conventions. This is why, after having read the bill, I find it meets requirements of the farmers. Sometimes, they may be justified in voicing apprehensions such as those which the previous speaker has just expressed but if the hon. member reads the text closely, his fears will be dismissed since the board may buy in any province, in the West, in the East or in Ontario, it does not matter.

Every aspect of the problem has been dealt with and I believe no one in this house would be justified in objecting to the bill.

Mr. Speaker, I was very happy to learn that the bill was being introduced just as I was coming into the house. I have only been here for a few days and it is precisely for this reason that I have been sent here. It is for this reason that I was elected on September 19. Contrary to what certain people who worked against me in my constituency may have thought, it is on the strength of my platform that I was elected, and I consider it to be of prime importance. That is why, Mr. Speaker, I will support it 100 per cent and I congratulate the hon. minister for his contribution in formulating this policy which is designed to help farmers in eastern Canada achieve their objectives.

Topic:   CANADIAN LIVESTOCK FEED BOARD
Subtopic:   ASSISTANCE IN STORAGE AND TRANSPORTATION COSTS
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