Solon Earl LOW

LOW, Solon Earl

Personal Data

Party
Social Credit
Constituency
Peace River (Alberta)
Birth Date
January 8, 1900
Deceased Date
December 22, 1962
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solon_Earl_Low
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=fdce9d46-5c36-4ca6-b6c7-52d1e6f9ba0b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, gentleman, school principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
SC
  Peace River (Alberta)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
SC
  Peace River (Alberta)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
SC
  Peace River (Alberta)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
SC
  Peace River (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 649)


July 24, 1964

Mr. Low:

That is what this says.

Topic:   PROVISION OF PENALTIES UNDER UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION
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February 1, 1958

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of National Revenue arising out of his answer to the question asked by the hon. member for Kenora-Rainy River. In his reply the minister indicated that various contradictory reports had come out of the United States concerning the action or possible action in Washington by the United States tax department.

I should like to ask the minister this question. If he discovers that the United States tax department is determined to go ahead with the appeal in the Premium case, will he then ask his colleagues in the government to join him in making a stronger protest to the United States government against their action? Because it would indicate, in my judgment, that the aide-memoire which had been sent previously and which this government merely reiterated in its recent note was not strong enough medicine.

Topic:   REFERENCE TO CANADIAN PROTEST AGAINST UNITED STATES ACTION
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February 1, 1958

Mr. Low:

Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the fact that you have seen me. I know that the minister would like to speak at this moment but I do think that on a matter of such serious import each of the parties should make its stand clear. I want to do that at this time. I have listened to the case made by the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre, and I too want to say that I think he made a completely impregnable case. I do not see how in the world any responsible minister of the crown could find a flaw in it. This is the first time in my 23 years experience in legislatures and parliaments that I have ever seen this particular device resorted to. I have every sympathy with a government that finds itself under the necessity of using governor general's warrants or, as we used to call them in the provincial field, special warrants. That is understandable. But, Mr. Chairman, in every single case I have ever seen where such warrants have been used the government concerned brought them back somehow to the legislature or parliament for validation or approval. That is the only way that a government can possibly avoid arrogating to itself the legislative functions of government.

I was in British East Africa three years ago, along with the Minister of Finance. At that time he was representing the opposition in the Canadian parliament. I heard him deliver a speech in the parliament of Kenya in which he castigated the Liberals for attempting to arrogate to themselves the authority and rights of the legislative function of government. He did what a lot' of people thought was a masterful job, but I am surprised to note that today the very government to which he belongs is attempting to do the kind of thing against which he inveighed.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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February 1, 1958

Mr. Low:

-before parliament has another opportunity to discuss and debate these things, then I say that becomes a most serious breach of the rights of parliament. I want to add my voice to the protests that have been raised today in connection with this unusual course of action. It is most unusual and one that cannot be justified by any argument that is brought forward. I would certainly find myself in the position where, if a motion were proposed, I would have to vote to censure the government for having embarked on this course unless they had the courage to back up, acknowledge their fault and take the other course which would be to give parliament a chance to say whether it approved of the amount of the governor general's warrant.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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February 1, 1958

Mr. Low:

In the earlier part of his contribution to this debate the Minister of Finance tried to bury the real issue in a flood of tears shed evidently for the starving Hungarians. Nobody had denied that the government had the right, and, indeed, the obligation, to pass governor general's warrants for the purpose of taking care of the Hungarian situation in so far as it affected us. Not a single member of the house objected to that, and certainly we did not object because we felt it was right and proper for the government to make a provision by warrant for this expenditure, which had not been provided for in the normal way. But the Minister of Finance did not, at any point in his argument, touch the real issue.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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