Thomas VIEN

VIEN, The Hon. Thomas, P.C., Q.C., B.A., LL.L., F.R.C.G.S., F.A.G.S.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Outremont (Quebec)
Birth Date
July 19, 1881
Deceased Date
November 18, 1972
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Vien
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=fd945515-43b5-4eed-9b1c-8c100beef111&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
L LIB
  Lotbinière (Quebec)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  Lotbinière (Quebec)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Outremont (Quebec)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Outremont (Quebec)
  • Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons (May 21, 1940 - October 4, 1942)
  • Speaker of the Senate (January 23, 1943 - August 23, 1945)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 985 of 986)


April 5, 1918

Mr. VIEN:

I was coming to that point. I am trying to make that point clear to the minds of my English-speaking friends. I have often discussed the matter with them, and I have met with the same objection that the hon. member for North Simcoe has now raised. I say that the contention of the Government is simply a matter of pride, a matter of fulfilling a promise which was certainly made without due consideration. Why should we keep five divisions, or four divisions, or two divisions at the front? If, Sir, we have sufficient men to maintain two divisions at the front and two divisions in the rear, let us keep two divisions in the rear. Sir, we must not forget-and this is an answer to my hon. friend, the contradictor,-that France

handed over a portion of its front to England, that England assigned a portion of its front to Canada. Why should not Canada to-day hand over a portion of its front to the United States? We have for three years during the war done our duty. Why should we not now, when we are called upon to make a greater effort, allow our partners in the war to do, not better than we have done, but just as much. Sir, this is the point of view of many French Canadians. They look at the matter from a purely Canadian point of view, because it will not be in the interests of Canada to ruin the human, the vital force of the Dominion, and ruin its credit.

In so far as the. sending of 100,000 men overseas is essential to the winning of the war, if it were so, I would immediately approve of it, hut I say that it is not essential, because if a hundred thousand Canadians were kept here, a hundred thousand Americans could be sent overseas to do their

duty and take their .share, and in that light we view the true interest of the Canadian people. We are not in Canada for one year or for twenty-{five years; we must foresee the after-the-war conditions, and in so doing must 'consider to wlhat extent our effort financially, and in so far as man power is concerned, must go.

'Mr. MORPHY: Will the hon. gentleman allow -me a question? 'There are, I believe 4,000 odd French Canadians fighting bravely at the front. Does the argument of the hon. gentleman mean that no further French Canadians should go to support them, and that we should depend upon Americans to support those brave French Canadians at the front?

Topic:   ADOLPHE STEIN.
Full View Permalink

April 5, 1918

Mr. VIEN:

Lotbiniere.

Topic:   ADOLPHE STEIN.
Full View Permalink

April 5, 1918

Mr. VIEN:

Because I do not think that I said anything against the Orange Order.

Topic:   ADOLPHE STEIN.
Full View Permalink

April 5, 1918

Mr. VIEN:

Absolutely.

Topic:   ADOLPHE STEIN.
Full View Permalink

April 5, 1918

Mr. VIEN:

Is the hon. gentleman referring to my speech?

Topic:   ADOLPHE STEIN.
Full View Permalink