Bruce HALLIDAY

HALLIDAY, Bruce, M.D., C.C.F.P., F.C.F.P., F.R.C.G.P. (Hon)

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Oxford (Ontario)
Birth Date
June 18, 1926
Deceased Date
January 1, 2011
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Halliday
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f7f0538c-2368-4c9f-96f0-324dc3e40d16&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician

Parliamentary Career

July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 93)


December 3, 1992

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Mr. Speaker, I too would like to join this debate on the Law of the Sea and address it from the problem of overfishing on the high seas and the Canadian legal initiative that responds to this crisis.

This is a global problem that has a severe impact on fisheries subject to the jurisdiction of coastal states through the harvesting of both straddling and highly migratory stocks on the high seas.

Although the overfishing of straddling stocks on the high seas has caused particular concern to Canada, this cannot be dismissed as merely a local problem. It is world-wide. It affects groundfish stocks like hake in the southwest Atlantic on Argentina's Patagonian Shelf, the orange roughy stocks on the Challenger Plateau off New Zealand, the blue whiting and jack mackerel in the east central and southeast Pacific off Chile and Peru, and the pollock in the so-called donut hole in the central Bering Sea between Russia and the United States and the pollock in the so-called peanut hole in the centre of the Sea of Okhotsk off Russia's Pacific coast.

The problem of overfishing on the high seas is increasingly being recognized by the international community as an important environmental issue that threatens ecological disaster, both on the high seas and in waters subject to national jurisdiction.

For example, the 1987 report of the World Commission on Environment and Development warned of the threat to living marine resources posed by over-exploitation, pollution and land-based development.

More recently, in 1991, the heads of government of the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, Japan, Italy and Canada met in London as the G-7, and at

Canada's insistence issued a declaration urging compliance with the regimes established by regional fisheries organizations through effective monitoring and enforcement measures.

In a report that was released in 1991 the Secretary-General of the United Nations underlined in eloquent terms the dimension of the problem of overfishing by distant water fishing fleets. I quote from that report:

The elaboration of the Law of the Sea regime for the rational management and conservation of high seas living resources is now firmly inscribed in the international agenda. While this may be in large part attributable to the large-scale drift-net fishing issue, it is to be emphasized that this issue is but one symptom of the larger problems confronting world fisheries, within national jurisdiction and beyond. Another symptom is the report of problems of overfishing by distant water fishing fleets in the proximity of EEZs.

Again, in a report issued last May, entitled World Fisheries Situation, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization said:

Legal aspects of high seas fishing are not addressed comprehensively in the Law of the Sea Convention and where high seas fishing issues are concerned there is a general lack of clarity with respect to important matters such as enforcement of conservation and management measures. There is a pressing need for these issues to be considered further and conceptually developed so that a framework for international management of high seas fisheries might be agreed.

The United Nations General Assembly took up this issue for the first time in 1989 when, in response to the problem of overfishing in the northwest Atlantic outside Canada's 200-mile limit, it expressed concern regarding the use of fishing methods and practices on the high seas that could have an adverse impact on the conservation and management of the living resources of the marine environment.

The concern was elaborated on by the General Assembly in a resolution adopted in 1990.

Canada and like-minded countries built on these resolutions at the 1991 session of the General Assembly. As a result of these efforts the General Assembly adopted a resolution that:

(1) criticized fishing methods and practices, such as vessel reflagging and inadequate surveillance, control and enforcement, aimed at evading the regulation and control of high seas fishing;

December 3, 1992

(2) recognized that the measures now in place to conserve and manage the living resources of the high seas are not effective and that they do not adequately implement the provisions of the Law of the Sea Convention;

(3) called on states to prohibit fishing methods and practices which can have an adverse impact on the conservation and management of the living resources of the high seas, and to take the measures required to give full effect to the applicable provisions of the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention; and

(4) called on states to comply with the regimes established by regional fisheries organizations through effective monitoring and enforcement measures.

It is against this background of developing international concern with respect to problems caused by overfishing by distant water fleets that Canada launched its legal initiative to resolve the problem of overfishing on the high seas.

The Canadian initiative sought to develop specific principles and measures consistent with the Law of the Sea Convention with a view to giving full implementation to the provisions of that convention, strengthening regional organizations and ensuring the recognition of the special interest of coastal states with respect to straddling stocks.

This would provide an effective legal regime governing activities on the high seas.

The first steps in the elaboration of the principles and measures were taken at a conference held in St. John's, Newfoundland in September 1990. The conference recognized the need for such measures and agreed on a set of conclusions reflecting an increasingly shared view on how the rules of international law should be interpreted and applied.

This document was further developed at a meeting of Latin American states, New Zealand and Canada in May in Santiago, Chile. The document, dubbed "the Santiago paper", set the guidelines for participation by Canada and like-minded states at three major international conferences in the first half of 1992. The first was the International Conference on Responsible Fishing, held in Cancun, Mexico in May. The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans led that Canadian delegation.

Private Members' Business

At the urging of Canada and like-minded countries, the 66 participants at Cancun declared that:

(1) states should co-operate on bilateral, regional and multilateral levels to establish, reinforce and implement effective means and mechanisms to ensure responsible fishing on the high seas, in accordance with relevant provisions of the Law of the Sea Convention;

(2) the freedom of states to fish on the high seas must be balanced with the obligation to co-operate with other states to ensure conservation and rational management of living resources, in accordance with relevant provisions of the Law of the Sea Convention; and

(3) states should take effective action, consistent with international law, to deter reflagging of vessels as a means of avoiding compliance with applicable conservation and management rules for fishing activities on the high seas.

Also in May, the Organization of American States met and unanimously adopted a strong resolution on the protection of fisheries. The Secretary of State for External Affairs led that Canadian delegation. The resolution expressed alarm at the environmental degradation caused by overfishing on the high seas, particularly in the waters adjacent to the areas subject to the national jurisdiction of American states.

It also for the first time supported the convening, on an urgent basis, of an inter-governmental conference, under the auspices of the United Nations, following the Rio summit to deal with high seas fishing problems through the effective conservation and management of high seas fish stocks. The most important conference that took place in this period was the UN Conference on the Environment and Development convened in Rio de Janeiro at the head of government level at the beginning of June. The Prime Minister led the Canadian delegation and made the management of straddling stocks on the high seas a priority.

The conference adopted a number of measures of great importance to Canada. One could go on and list several of these but my time is running out. I should conclude by saying that Canada intends to work closely with like-minded states to ensure that the conference adopts rules to protect straddling and highly migratory stocks from being harmed by overfishing on the high seas.

December 3, 1992

Private Members' Business

The Minister of Fisheries and Oceans has already announced that representatives of like-minded states will be invited to meet in St. John's in January to review developments and co-ordinate strategy. We are determined to bring overfishing of straddling stocks off Canada's 200-mile zone to an end and to do so quickly.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS
Subtopic:   INTERNATIONAL LAW OF THE SEA
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December 3, 1992

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Mr. Speaker, the United Nations has declared today, December 3, as the International Day of Disabled Persons.

Canada must invest in all her citizens, including persons with disabilities, if we are to ensure that the Canada of tomorrow will be strong and competitive. Such a commitment has been clearly demonstrated in recent years by our annual National Access Awareness Week and the current five-year National Strategy for the Integration of Persons Disabilities.

Canada is recognized as a world leader in integrating disabled persons into the community.

Earlier this year we hosted Independence '92 in Vancouver. In October the Secretary of State, the minister responsible for the status of disabled persons hosted the first ever International Conference of Ministers Responsible for Persons with Disabilities in Montreal. A few days later he addressed the UN General Assembly in special session to mark the end of the Decade of Disabled Persons.

Today, as we recognize the International Day of Disabled Persons, I congratulate the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for their vision, energy and leadership in working for equality of opportunity for persons with disabilities, both in Canada and around the world.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   INTERNATIONAL DAY OF DISABLED PERSONS
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November 26, 1992

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Madam Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 34(1), I have the honour to present to the House, in both official languages, the report of the Canadian Group of ^Interparliamentary Union which represented Canada at the 88th Interparliamentary Conference in Stockholm, Sweden, from September 7 to September 12, 1992.

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Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   REPORT OF CANADIAN GROUP ON 88TH CONFERENCE
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September 16, 1992

Mr. Halliday:

Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank colleagues opposite for their willingness to co-operate in this and I can assure them my remarks will be fairly brief.

The proposed act under consideration concerns certain modifications to the act of incorporation of the Royal Society of Canada found in Victoria, chapter 46. The Royal Society of Canada was founded in 1882 by the Governor General of Canada the Right Hon. the Marquess of Lome and was incorporated by the Parliament of Canada in May 1883. Its object is to promote learning

and research in the arts and sciences in all parts of Canada.

The founding members were led by Sir William Dawson, principal of McGill University and first president of the society and the Hon. P. J. O. Chauveau, former premier of Quebec and the society's second president. Despite sentiments that the formation of such a body was premature, these men saw the need for a body devoted to encouraging the growth of scholarship and research in the newly formed nation. At that time, active scholars and researchers were few in number and widely scattered largely across central and eastern Canada. The new society provided a venue for the presentation of their work and an opportunity for contacting others with similar professional interests.

In considering the scope of the body, the Marquess of Lome was the decisive influence in ensuring that it represented the full range of existing scholarship including literature, history and the scholarly arts as well as the natural sciences. In this it followed the model of I'Institut de France which incorporates five academies rather than that of the exclusively scientific membership of the Royal Society of London. One of the founders, Mr. Joseph Tasse, remarked that it was a federation of the intellect completing the still young political federation of the provinces.

The society today has been true to the vision of its founders. It now comprises three academies, VAcademie des lettres et des sciences humaines, the Academy of Humanities and Social Science and the Academy of Science, which includes divisions for the applied sciences and engineering as well as the life sciences, physical sciences and earth and space sciences. It continues to be guided by Dawson's original aim of building an organization characterized by: "productiveness exclusive in its membership, but inclusive in that it offers its benefits to all".

Through its 110 years of service to Canada it has elected to membership leading scholars and scientists from all parts of our country representing an ever widening array of fields of learning and research. An unbroken succession of annual meetings has been recorded in its publications which provide a rich source of information about the intellectual growth of Canada.

Private Members' Business

The society now gives 17 medals and awards in various fields of endeavour. Some are given for distinguished lifetime achievements, while others are awarded to younger researchers for outstanding work early in their careers. It has expanded its activities in recent decades by holding conferences in many parts of Canada on topics of the day and frequently in co-operation with other organizations. It launches studies into matters of national or global importance and provides advice to government and the public at large on current issues.

It has increasingly sought to bridge academic disciplines and address complex topics by bringing together specialists with different experience and expertise. This approach has distinguished its comprehensive studies of AIDS in Canada, of the safety of nuclear power and of the challenge of global change. This is the hallmark of the society's approach to its ongoing responsibilities for fostering research on the environment in its natural and human dimensions, for raising public awareness of science, for advancing the position of women in academic and professional life and for evaluating the research accomplishments and capabilities of the country.

By these and other demonstrations of its capacity to mobilize its members and call upon the commitment to service that they make upon election, the society has received increasing recognition of its emerging role as a national academy.

Since 1989 it has received growing support from its members, from government and increasingly from the private sector toward the goal of realizing its full potential.

Compared to national academies and the equivalents in other advanced and even some developing countries, the Royal Society of Canada still has far to go in increasing the scope of its responsibilities and activities. In its efforts to achieve further growth, it is found that the act by which it was incorporated in 1883 imposes certain restrictions. The petition now before the House seeks to remove these constraints.

The society requests that the provision in section 1 of the original act which limits the value of the real estate that the society may hold to no more than $4,000 be deleted. This would permit the society to obtain property for its purposes without restriction as to value.

September 16, 1992

Private Members' Business

Clause 2 of the amendment requests that sections 5 and 6 of the original act which concern the continuation of the original bylaws and offices of the society also be deleted as having served their purpose and being no longer relevant. Similarly, it is proposed in clause 3 that section 8 of the original act concerning the competence of members of the society as witnesses in any legal actions undertaken by the society also be removed as being no longer necessary in present day law.

I would like to add that it is my privilege to co-sponsor this bill along with the recently retired and highly respected former senator representing Quebec, the Hon. Arthur Tremblay.

I am therefore honoured to present this bill to the House and I wish to thank all of my colleagues for graciously agreeing to this expeditious process which, I believe, is appropriate in light of the consideration given by the other place.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS
Subtopic:   AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA MEASURE TO AMEND
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September 16, 1992

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford) moved

that Bill S-7, an act to amend an act to incorporate the Royal Society of Canada, be now read the second time and referred to a legislative committee in the Departmental envelope.

He said: Mr. Speaker, I think you will find that there is unanimous consent for the following motion:

Thai, notwithstanding any Standing Order and the usual practices of the House, Bill S-7, an act to amend an act to incorporate the Royal Society of Canada, be referred, after second reading, to a Committee of the Whole instead of to a legislative committee in the Departmental envelope, and

Private Members' Business

That, unless otherwise disposed of, at the end of the time provided for the consideration of Private Members' Business this day, any proceedings then before the House shall be interrupted and every question necessary to dispose of the said bill at all stages shall be put forthwith and successively without further debate or amendment.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS
Subtopic:   AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF CANADA MEASURE TO AMEND
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