Bruce HALLIDAY

HALLIDAY, Bruce, M.D., C.C.F.P., F.C.F.P., F.R.C.G.P. (Hon)

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Oxford (Ontario)
Birth Date
June 18, 1926
Deceased Date
January 1, 2011
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_Halliday
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f7f0538c-2368-4c9f-96f0-324dc3e40d16&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician

Parliamentary Career

July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Oxford (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 93)


June 4, 1993

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Madam Speaker, this being National Access Awareness Week, in which you have shown special interest, I am pleased to rise today on behalf of the hon. member for Calgary West, as well as the members of the Standing Committee on Human Rights and the Status of Disabled Persons, to recognize the recipient of the 1993-94 Centennial Flame Research Award, Mr. Michael Ho of Calgary, who is visiting us in Ottawa today. This award is funded by the coins thrown into the Centennial flame fountain.

Mr. Ho, a lawyer who because of a head injury is no longer able to practise, has been active in organizations providing services to individuals with head injuries including the Head Injury Association of Alberta.

He is proposing to research the success stories of survivors of head injuries to serve as guiding lights for people dealing with this type of disability.

The main subject of his study will be Laurie Cormack, who not only experienced a head injury but has struggled with the trauma of being a battered wife.

It should also be recognized that Mr. Ho's contribution to Canada was acknowledged when he received the Canada 125 Award in 1992, as well as a personal testimonial from the Prime Minister which he received in 1989.

June 4. 1993

Congratulations are in order for Mr. Ho who is an inspiration to his fellow citizens.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   MICHAEL HO
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May 26, 1993

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Mr. Speaker, as we approach National Access Awareness Week I have the honour to table, in both official languages, the fourth report of the Standing Committee on Human Rights and the Status of Disabled Persons entitled "Completing the Circle: Report on Aboriginal People with Disabilities".

I believe the tabling of this report comes at a most appropriate time as we mark National Aboriginal Week in Canada. As well the United Nations has declared 1993 the International Year of Indigenous People.

Of special interest, I am honoured to present this report in a format including four different styles. One is large print, the second is Braille, the third is audio cassette and the fourth is computer disc. I am happy indeed to present these. I trust that other committees will perhaps follow suit in presenting their reports simultaneously in these various alternate formats.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109 the committee requests a comprehensive government response to this report.

[Editor's Note: See today's Votes and Proceedings.]

May 26, 1993

Topic:   HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE STATUS OF DISABLED PERSONS
Subtopic:   FOURTH REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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May 13, 1993

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Mr. Speaker, the first week of June is National Access Awareness Week. Teams of politicians, disabled individuals, labour leaders, people from the business community and from all walks of life have been busy throughout the year in efforts to eliminate barriers facing persons with disabilities.

Canada's Secretary of State and minister responsible for the status of disabled persons has taken our experiences on disability to the world stage. Together with international colleagues and leaders from the disability community, she has pioneered an initiative to improve the quality of life for the world's 500 million people who are disabled.

Mr. Speaker, we have appreciated your ongoing support of National Access Awareness Week and the concern you have for accessibility to all aspects of Parliament.

May 13, 1993

I want to urge all members of the House to support National Access Awareness Week in the communities throughout their ridings. We can build together on the minister's their your leadership and our record of achievement.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL ACCESS AWARENESS WEEK
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March 10, 1993

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Madam Speaker, I have the honour to present the third report of the Standing

March 10, 1993

Committee on Human Rights and the Status of Disabled Persons entitled As True as Taxes, Disability and the Income Tax System, in both official languages.

Pursuant to Standing Order 109, the committee requests a government response within 150 days.

I would like to add, Madam Speaker, that the implementation of some or all of its eight recommendations will bring disabled people in Canada that much closer to a real, true economic and social integration within our society.

[Editor's Note: See today's Votes and Proceedings.]

Topic:   HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE STATUS OF DISABLED PERSONS
Subtopic:   THIRD REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE
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February 19, 1993

Mr. Bruce Halliday (Oxford):

Madam Speaker, I want to say a word this morning about the issue of world population and the failure of the UNCED meeting in Rio last June to address the appropriate issues there.

On December 30, 1992 Anita Gordon, media advisor to Maurice Strong, Secretary-General at the UNCED meeting in Rio who by the way is a Canadian, and co-author of the book It's a Matter of Human Survival, in discussing the failure of the earth summit at UNCED and referring to Agenda 21, the agenda for that meeting, said:

In fact, if you examine Agenda 21 carefully, you'll see that what it does is talk about our symptoms. It does not talk about our basic problem'. It talks about water quality. It talks about deforestation. It talks about loss of species. It does not deal with the fundamental problem, the thing that is sort of setting everything on fire on this planet, and that's the human species.

It does not talk about how we ourselves are expanding on the planet. It doesn't talk about overpopulation and it doesn't- certainly not -talk about overconsumption, which is the problem in the West. And, because it doesn't deal with those two basic fundamental things, it really does not attack the root of the problem.

What we need is more foreign aid directed toward education and health care.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
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