James Elisha BROWN

BROWN, James Elisha, Q.C., B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Brant (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 12, 1913
Deceased Date
January 26, 1974
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Elisha_Brown
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f74a603a-7515-4332-82a0-29a7a41643db&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Brant (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 38 of 38)


March 18, 1954

Mr. Brown (Brantford):

Is there any loss of family allowances when a beneficiary fails to report a change of address within a prescribed period of time?

Topic:   FAMILY ALLOWANCES
Subtopic:   CHANGE OF ADDRESS
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February 24, 1954

Mr. Brown (Brantford):

Would the minister indicate whether there has been a change in the existing law. Clause 170 defines a slot machine, but in the old section there was no definition. It referred simply to certain automatic machines which were assumed to be contrivances for playing games of chance. In this clause it seems to be defined.

Criminal Code

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   REVISION AND AMENDMENT OF EXISTING STATUTE
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February 24, 1954

Mr. Brown (Brantford):

Yes.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   REVISION AND AMENDMENT OF EXISTING STATUTE
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January 21, 1954

Mr. J. E. Brown (Brantford):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to say a few words in support of this bill, the purpose of which is to promote the construction of new homes and improve the living conditions in this country. During the last election campaign I promised my own constituents of Brantford that I would press for new legislation of the kind that is now before us. I note that the government, in its appeal to the people for support, did not make any promises whatever along those lines but I felt a keen personal interest in the whole matter and allowed myself to go on record in favour of a new housing act.

I believe that the government is to be congratulated on bringing forward this bill so early in the session after the last election. The legislation which is before us, and which will replace the National Housing Act now in force, is breaking new ground in Canada so far as progressive legislation is concerned. In my view what we are embarking upon is a forward step, and it ought to have far-reaching and beneficial consequences. We are all agreed on one thing-at least I do not believe any member in this house doubts it- that there is still a need for more and better housing in this great country of ours. The question is, does this legislation meet our needs; and, more important still, is it sound?

Some hon. members might feel quite sincerely that the bill does not go far enough,

and in particular that a flat 10 per cent down payment should have been provided on every house constructed under the act costing up to $12,000 to $15,000. Upon first consideration, I might have been of this view, but on sober second thought, Mr. Speaker, I sincerely believe that the provisions contained in the bill are sound; that the legislation is wise and ought to be supported. We are engaged in a new venture. The government is striving to place some of the available credit of the country behind the man who is embarking on that greatest endeavour of all, the founding of a home of his own. Most of us in the house, I am sure, believe that the great majority of Canadians ought to own their own homes. In my view this is of necessity a basic feature of our society.

If Canada is going to be great and strong, strong at home and abroad; if we are going to make a contribution to the world of today; then this nation of ours must be a nation of home owners. If a man can own real estate, part of the soil of Canada, and construct a house thereon under the provisions of this act, he thereupon has a genuine stake in the welfare and future of our country. This is one of the reasons this bill is so important, and why its effects may be far-reaching.

Most of the young men and women of our land need the assistance of some form of credit in order to establish themselves in life. That is what this bill provides. I do not think the majority of young men and women in Canada want handouts from the government. They need assistance in the form of loans which they can pay off. They want to own a home of their own, and to pay for that home. In this way they hope to acquire a little independence of that type which has been enjoyed by our fathers and forefathers in this country since the beginning. For this reason, Mr. Speaker, I am going to support this bill. I believe it to be a move genuinely designed to promote home ownership from one end of the country to the other.

Does this legislation go far enough? In the election campaign I suggested a 10 per cent down payment be made available. Now, that has been done in this act. If a man desires to construct a $12,000 home or a $16,000 home, would it be wise for him to borrow up to 90 per cent of that large sum? Could he afford to keep up the resultant heavy monthly payments under such a scheme? Should this government give him encouragement by providing in this bill for his doing so? I do not think so. Would it be wise for any man to assume an obligation that would take a period of more than 25 years to amortize under normal repayment

National Housing Act

terms? Should the government have encouraged him to do that? Again, I say I do not think so.

What concerns me in connection with this bill is not reducing the amount of the down payment below what is provided or extending the term of tenure of the mortgage. What is concerning me is this: will the bill result in loans becoming more available to the average citizen? That is the question which is paramount; that is the question on which this bill should stand or fall.

The trouble in the past has been, at least in my view and in my experiences from day to day in a law practice, that satisfactory loans have been too difficult to attain. The provision in this legislation to make available insured loans, through the banks, in my opinion should open the door to much greater credit facilities for the average man and woman in Canada.

I do not think the bill should be opposed simply because some of its terms do not satisfy some hon. members. Let us give the legislation before us a fair trial for, say, two years, thus giving at least an opportunity to ascertain if in practice it will have the effect we want it to have, and that we hope it will have.

If housing loans become more available to the general public than they have been in the past, then this bill will have amply fulfilled its purpose and will have justified the basic idea which prompted the government to bring in the legislation at the present time.

Like many other hon. members on this side of the house I was very much puzzled and, indeed, shocked by the speech of the hon. member for Eglinton (Mr. Fleming), who spoke on behalf of Her Majesty's loyal opposition. I am sorry he is not in the house tonight. It is not for me to comment upon the speech of one who holds the esteem of all parties in the house, and who is a very powerful figure in the Conservative opposition. But it was impossible for me to ascertain whether he and his party were for the bill or were against it.

At any rate, it may be that he and his party have not quite made up their minds. He did utter some valuable warnings as to the possible results which might ensue from the passage of the bill, but he offered no substitute and brought forward no other proposal on behalf of his party to take the place of this legislation.

Returning to the bill, I am glad that it will make possible a better service than has ever been available before to the residents of small centres and remote communities across Canada. It is a great forward step.

1344 HOUSE OF

National Housing Act

Instead of having to deal by correspondence with lending companies, the people will be in a position to consult the nearest branch bank manager, and to talk over their problems with him. This will be a great convenience.

The hon. member for Eglinton thought that the banks would not co-operate; I think they will. I believe that it will be of the greatest convenience to the people who live in the remote communities and smaller centres in our country. I have in mind, in particular, my own good city of Brantford, which I am proud to represent in the House of Commons. Then, we also have people in the township of Burford, a truly splendid community in my constituency, who, I believe, will be vitally affected by the passage of this legislation. In spite of what the hon. member for Eglinton has said, it could be that they will be able to go to those two historic little villages of Burford and Scotland, and there discuss with their bank managers the vital problem of housing, which concerns all those people.

The people in these communities are in my view the very backbone of Canada. They are sure to derive lasting benefits from this legislation. I hope that when the measure reaches the committee stage the individual sections will receive careful and thorough study, particularly with respect to the provisions relating to interest rates.

I repeat that the government ought to be congratulated upon bringing forward legislation of the kind proposed in this bill. In my view it deserves and eventually will have the support of a large majority of members in the house, of whatever party, who are sincerely desirous of promoting the well-being of our country in a substantial and material way.

(Translation) :

I want to conclude my remarks in the beautiful tongue of my French-Canadian colleagues, whom I have been so happy to know since my arrival in Ottawa.

In my opinion the bill now before the house should obtain the support of the majority of hon. members. I see in it a sincere effort on the part of the government to help the man who would like to start on the most important undertaking of his life, that of acquiring his own house and establishing a family.

I am confident that this measure will contribute toward increasing the possibilities open to Canadian citizens and widening their horizons.

(Text):

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   SUBSTITUTION OF NEW LEGISLATION TO INSURE APPROVED LENDERS, ETC.
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