James Elisha BROWN

BROWN, James Elisha, Q.C., B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Brant (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 12, 1913
Deceased Date
January 26, 1974
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Elisha_Brown
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f74a603a-7515-4332-82a0-29a7a41643db&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
LIB
  Brantford (Ontario)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
LIB
  Brant (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 38)


October 15, 1970

Mr. Brown:

Construction of these dams, the scenic highway and adjoining parkland would not cost too much money, nowhere near as much as has been spent on the upper Grand River. The lower Grand River needs development no matter what the Kitchener-biased Grand River Conservation Authority may say about this matter, or may have done up to the present time. The hon. member is not in his seat at the moment. Also, we are witnessing tremendous industrial development taking place at Nanticoke, which makes it imperative that the federal and provincial authorities arrange to purchase all the available recreational land so that it can be saved for future and present generations.

The project I am talking about is a conservational and recreational matter. It is a project of great importance to all persons living in the Brant-Haldimand, Norfolk-Hamilton-Wentworth area. It is a project that will be utilized in the days to come.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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October 15, 1970

Mr. Brown:

I am glad, Mr. Speaker, that the hon. member for Hami ton-Wentworth (Mr. Gibson) has cheered, because it is a project that will be utilized in the future by the inhabitants of the Golden Horseshoe of Ontario lying only a stone's throw away, where people have to tow their boats hundreds of miles up north when they could simply be putting them on the Grand, that magnificent, scenic waterway which flows past and through my constituency and near Norfolk and other neighbouring areas of great importance. Millions of dollars have been spent by the federal government on the development of the Trent and Rideau waterways, yet since Confederation hardly a cent has been spent on the Grand. This is where the majority of the people live. I admit, Mr. Speaker, that I have not been a very good Member of Parliament, otherwise this and past governments would have done something about the matter.

I now come to my second point. Unfortunately, in my constituency for the past year and a half there has been heavy unemployment. I do not like this at all. 1 do not

October 15, 1970

think anyone would like the situation that exists in an area where there is heavy unemployment. I am not crying; I am simply stating a tact that is well known. The unemployment which exists in my area cannot be tolerated very much longer. As a matter ot tact, it is one of the worst pockets of unemployment in Canada. How can the economy of Brant and the surrounding area be stimulated? It can be stimulated by granting to the area the facilities it deserves, needs and can exploit-the most extensive and beautiful recreational facilities that can be found in North America and the reconstruction and redevelopment of navigability for pleasure craft on the Grand River.

When this is done, Mr. Speaker, you can count on it that we will have all the industrial growth we can handle in my important area. This will help bring about full employment. Also, the revenue from tourism resulting from these improvements will in itself greatly stimulate the economy of my district. This whole area in the past has been loyal to Canada. Long ago it was loyal to the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom. Today it is loyal to the Liberal tradition in Parliament through its representatives. I say, let the Liberal tradition in Parliament show its loyalty to the area which I represent, as well as to its neighbouring and adjoining counties which I love.

I have nearly finished, Mr. Speaker. Some members will be delighted to hear this. However, there was some laughter a moment ago when I said what I did about the government not having done anything to assist and stimulate employment in my area. Not too long ago a great statesman in this country said that to govern is to choose. Mr. Speaker, I cannot govern; I can only choose. This is limiting to a degree, but it is not too limiting because I can choose and have chosen. I have chosen the man who wrote the Speech from the Throne.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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October 15, 1970

Mr. Brown:

What I have said is a well known fact, publicized by none other than the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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October 15, 1970

Mr. J. E. Brown (Brant):

Mr. Speaker, I intervene in this debate in order to deal with two vital matters which in my opinion are linked together and are of great importance to the constituency of Brant. I trust that hon. members will be patient with me while I deal with the first subject which I have on many occasions emphasized in this House. This subject involves a matter which will shortly, I am sure, be dealt with in discussions between our government and the government of my province of Ontario. I refer specifically to the project of the restoration of the Grand River which flows through the constituency of Brant, and especially the restoration of navigation for pleasure craft passing through one of the most scenic and historic parts of the province of Ontario.

This subject should not be laughed at or belittled by any hon. member. Of course, it is not being laughed at or belittled by anyone, but I ask all hon. members to bear with me while I plead the cause of every man, woman and young person in Brant, in the province of Ontario, which I represent in Parliament. The need for an available source of recreation is great. It is great for the large population of my area. We have the Grand River flowing majestically behind the great city of Hamilton where boating is available, the best that can be found in the province of Ontario. It extends far beyond the limits of the county which I represent, flowing as it does behind Hamilton and then past the Six Nations Indian reserve and on to Lake Erie.

The project has been mentioned by many, but I am the one who has brought the matter to the attention of the House during many sessions. The project which I recommend would involve the reconstruction of about five dams between Port Maitland at the mouth of the Grand River and Newport, Ontario, just outside the city of Brantford. Most of this area lies in the constituency which is so ably represented in this House by the hon. member for Norfolk-Haldimand (Mr. Knowles), who I am sure agrees with everything I am saying to the House this afternoon.

The recommendation calls also for a scenic highway between Brantford and the mouth of the river. This is a provincial matter, of course, but it is also federal because the Grand River from its mouth as far as Brantford has since early days been regarded as a navigable waterway

[Mr. Nystrom.)

in western Ontario. Therefore, that waterway without doubt comes within the jurisdiction of Parliament. The recommendation I am making calls also for a strip park along the banks of the Grand River, and perhaps the formation of a Sir Frederick Haldimand national park a little farther down the river in the neighbouring constituency. I have said this before and I say it again: my 1949 Encyclopedia Britannica lists Brantford, Ontario, as one of the chief Canadian ports of entry.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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June 26, 1970

Mr. Brown:

Without further words I will gladly move the following motion:

That the recent disorders on the Six Nations Indian reserve be referred for study to the Committee on Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   DISTURBANCES, SIX NATIONS RESERVE-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43 TO REFER SUBJECT TO STANDING COMMITTEE
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