Edward George MCCULLOUGH

MCCULLOUGH, Edward George

Personal Data

Party
Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)
Constituency
Moose Mountain (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
May 28, 1909
Deceased Date
June 17, 1994
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_McCullough
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f2d24403-7a54-4b38-9e62-0118d999a2e6&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
CCF
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
CCF
  Moose Mountain (Saskatchewan)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
CCF
  Moose Mountain (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 249)


January 25, 1958

Mr. McCullough:

I am speaking about the cost of production. The Minister of Agriculture always wants to interject. What I am trying to point out is that the people on the land are faced with these factors.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
Full View Permalink

January 25, 1958

Mr. McCullough:

But here we have members opposite doing nothing but chortling and trying to interfere with what I have to say. Unless a principle is written into the bill by which we will know what the average cost of production is going to be and by which the farmers in general can be guided we will have an empty bill. There is no guarantee. It may be that the minister will be able to put adequate supports under farm commodities but there is no guarantee. There is simply no guarantee. The bill is as open-ended as the former legislation, and here we on this side of the house are spending days trying to get better legislation and at the same time actually trying to help the government.

I point out that we are doing so seriously and that if the government would accept some of our recommendations I am sure they would get the credit throughout the country. Instead, they are just trying to hurl insults at us and saying that we are not trying to do anything that will help our farmers. In my opinion this legislation could more properly be termed a bankruptcy act for agriculture rather than a bill which does anything for the farmers. What does it mean? It means that unless we can attach some meaning to the average cost of production, if the prescribed price is going to be estimated-

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
Full View Permalink

January 25, 1958

Mr. McCullough:

I rise at this time to continue the discussion of this very important section of the bill. It is my intention to move a further amendment. I move:

That subclause (2) of clause 2, of Bill 237 be amended by changing the period at the end thereof to a comma, and by adding immediately thereafter the following words:

"provided that in no case shall the percentage fixed by the governor in council be less than the estimated average cost of production of the commodity."

Mr. Chairman, I want to appeal to the minister and to all members of the house just as forcibly as I can to accept this amendment. I do not intend to repeat the statements by the Prime Minister which I put on record yesterday. He of course had gone on record many times in stating that he and the

Agricultural Products-Price Stabilization Conservative party are in favour of the farmer receiving a fair share of the national income. He and his party have gone on record from time to time, both in the house and in their convention, and in many speeches made by hon. members of the Conservative party, that the farmer, the man toiling on the land, should have not only the cost of production but also a decent standard of living.

This amendment simply asks that in no case shall the farmer be obliged to sell his products below a price which will give him the cost of production. I am sure that from the very fact that those of us coming from many parts of this great dominion of Canada have had various experiences, our attitudes in the house, of course,-while in most cases they are sincere-are different simply because of our experiences. I happen to be a farmer and I happen to have a close association with the people who work on the land. That is why I have taken this opportunity during this debate to fight with every bit of my resources to try to get this bill to mean something to the people on the land.

As I said before, we do not want anything special done for our farm people that we would not want done for the rest of our people. We are just simply saying that we feel that the farmers over the years under the former government, simply because they did not have an adequate price for their farm products, have had to leave the farms, and that policy has continued. I want to say to the hon. members that we are thinking of the tens of thousands of farmers leaving the land. Statistics will bear me out on this matter; this is not a wild figure; it is proved by the government's own figures. We cannot think of these people leaving their farms merely as statistics. These people are human beings. These are people who fought in the last war to win freedom for democracy and to win the kind of things we have in this country and of which we are proud. They are the people, many times, who have come back and tried to follow agriculture as a vocation. I want to mention some of these people because, rather than talk in pure statistical terms, I think it is sometimes important that we consider some of these questions.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
Full View Permalink

January 25, 1958

Mr. McCullough:

As we draw to the end

of the debate on this bill I should like to say that it has been a disappointment to me,

and I am sure to many farmers at least who would have hoped that we could have written into this legislation the principle of parity prices for farm products. I commend the amendment which the minister has now moved to the preamble of this bill and which says that the intent of the bill will be to provide farmers with a fair share of the national income. After our struggle, and the fact that we have been somewhat influential in getting numerous amendments to the bill-

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
Full View Permalink

January 25, 1958

Mr. McCullough:

I do not think the minister has given the committee the information I wanted, Mr. Chairman. He has stated that we would get this information from figures which are available. I think it is extremely difficult to get any authoritative figures with regard to an average cost of production. I should like the minister, if he can, to be more specific and say whose authority and whose figures the governor in council would accept in having regard to, or being guided by, in determining the

estimated average cost of production and setting these base support prices.

I think this is extremely important. Costs of production will vary all over the country. What type of farming will be used as a point of reference? Will it be the big corporation farm? Will it be the family farm, or will it be the smaller unit? At the present time our smaller farmers are going out of business in tens of thousands, and that is no exaggeration. Thousands of people are leaving the farms, and I should like to have some specific information from the government as to the means by which figures relating to the average cost of production are to be secured.

We in this group have said we think it is possible to get such figures. We think it is quite possible to find what is the cost of production, and from that to determine what is parity. I do not think the minister has given us any information. Is this to be done off the cuff? Is he going to proceed on the basis of some statistics compiled by the dominion bureau and by the universities, cr is the government itself going to determine these prices?

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   MEASURE TO PROVIDE GUARANTEED PRICES FOR CERTAIN COMMODITIES, ETC.
Full View Permalink