Allen Bristol AYLESWORTH

AYLESWORTH, The Hon. Sir Allen Bristol, P.C., K.C.M.G., K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
York North (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 27, 1854
Deceased Date
February 13, 1952
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allen_Bristol_Aylesworth
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=f086f57f-8342-4b2e-819a-37713991d665&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 22, 1905 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  York North (Ontario)
  • Minister of Labour (October 16, 1905 - June 1, 1906)
  • Postmaster General (October 16, 1905 - June 3, 1906)
  • Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada (June 4, 1906 - October 6, 1911)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  York North (Ontario)
  • Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada (June 4, 1906 - October 6, 1911)
January 11, 1923 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  York North (Ontario)
  • Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada (June 4, 1906 - October 6, 1911)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 126)


July 28, 1911

Sir ALLEN AYLESWOKTH (Minister of Justice).

Mr. Speaker, so far as the motion which the hon. gentleman has made is supported by reference to the circumstances of the canal at Newmarket, I ought to be very grateful to him for having again

brought the matter to the attention of this House and indirectly to the attention of the country, at all events to the attention of the constituency of North York, at this particular juncture. I am sure the hon. gentleman, if he should happen to have the time would find it very interesting indeed if he would make a little excursion across the boundary between his own constituency and the constituency of North York and make, in that riding, some of the remarks that usually are made when this question of the canal at Newmarket is under discussion in this House. It has been a pleasure to some hon. gentlemen opposite and to the newspapers which support them through the country to connect this work at Newmarket with my name. I have enjoyed the ingenuity and the art of the cartoonists who have amused themselves and their customers by cartoons that have appeared on the subject and I have not in the least failed to appreciate the newspaper remarks that, from time to time, have been made in reference to myself with regard to this canal. But while that is the fact and while, as I have on previous occasions said in this House, I should be very glad if I had any right to take to myself any credit in connection with the construction of the public work in question, the fact remains that I have no such right, and that the hon. gentleman, if any effort was necessary in finding a convenient subject wherewith to waste public time, might quite as well have taken up any other subject which antedated some two or three general elections. This particular question certainly arose before not merely the general elections of 1908 but before the general elections of 1904. At that time I had no idea of entering public life, I had no thought of representing or being a candidate in North York. This public work was undertaken, so far as North York is concerned, in circumstances which have already been detailed, and with which I need not occupy time that is supposed to foe of some value to somebody or other, by going over again. There was absolutely nothing political about it and there was, in every sense of the word, as much agitation for the construction of this work and for the government to undertake it, by the leading men among the Conservatives of North York as there was among the Liberals of that riding, and there has from first to last in this matter been no success in the attempt which has been made at different times to give some political aspect to this undertaking. I shall not discuss at all the question of whether or not it was a judicious and advisable thing in 1904 or whenever it was that the resolution of the government to undertake this work was reached. That was long before I came into the government or into this House or had any idea of doing so and that question, I

think has 'been satisfactorily settled after ample debate by not merely the result of the general elections of 1904 hut also by the result of those of 1908. If it pleases the hon. member for Centre York (Mr. Wallace) to seek to thresh out again this venerable and ancient dust heap or to search for the traditional grain of wheat in this pile of chaff-

Topic:   W. MULOCK.
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July 27, 1911

Sir ALLEN AYLESWORTH.

As I am one of the three ministers who enjoyed the privilege of remaining here during the two months' recess of parliament, and as this is a repetition of some newspaper attempted attacks made on some one or other, perhaps I should say a word about it. I do not know in what manner the alleged invitation to attend this function was sent to the three ministers in question, but I certainly would be a little interested to know. I have no doubt that my hon. friend the Postmaster General who was one of the three ministers who were her-e during the day of coronation would be equally glad to know whether or not the post office was utilized for the sending of the invitations. So far as I am concerned I have nothing to add to what was stated by the Minister of Public Works when this matter was mentioned in the House the other day. I do not pretend that I did not know, that there was going to be some sort of parade upon the lawn. I was at my office during each of the previous days, and I saw the building of the platform, and I should have been a very strange man if I had not supposed that it was in connection with the coronation, and that it was intended there should be some sort of celebration upon that occasion. But while that is so, and while for that reason I attach no consequence to the fact that no invitation came to me in any way in. connection with the matter, I was equally of opinion from what I saw in the newspapers that the matter was of a purely municipal or civil character. I understood an invitation had been extended to His Excellency and that His Excellency intended to be present, and that there was to be some sort of review or inspection of the Boy Scouts, and some parade of school children, and something of that sort. But that it was in any sense a government affair, or in any sense a national affair, or in any sense one that it was my duty as a minister of the Crown to attend, never occurred to

me. I am not much given to that sort of thing; I do not commonly attend such things, whether they are of a public character or something to which I would go merely as a spectator. In this instance the day being a holiday in the departments I was not in my office at as early an hour as usual, but I reached there just about when the small gathering of perhaps 150 or 200 boys and young people were separating on the lawn. If I had had the good fortune to reach the buildings a few minutes earlier, I think I should have gone to witness what was going on, but in the circumstances until somebody tried to make a great grievance of the absence of the ministers, and a slight even to His Gracious Majesty himself, it nevei occurred to me that there was the slightest importance attached to the matter one way or another. It should also be borne in mind that the fact of there being so few people present was because of a heavy rain shower in the morning, and the notifications that were put up about the city that the whole function was at an end, and that there would be no ceremony at all. I mention that, not as accounting for my own absence, because I did not know of the notices of cancellation until afterwards, but the circumstances are these I have described, and I can only say that if anybody thinks to make any political capital out of it, or to cast upon any of His Majesty's ministers in Canada aspersions as to their loyalty, it seems to me that it is about parallel to the waving of a pocket edition of the Union Jack. [DOT]

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-CORONATION CELEBRATION IN OTTAWA.
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July 26, 1911

1. The question calls for an opinion upon a matter of law in regard to which the government would desire to be advised if necessity arose. *

2 and 3. The government is of opinion that it has no power or jurisdiction in the premises.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   MARRIAGE LAWS.
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July 25, 1911

Sir ALLEN AYLESWORTH (Minister of Justice).

I do not feel that I am called

upon to make any explanation of the matter. I am quite sure that every member of this House understood the remarks I made on Friday last in reference to the probability of an election within a short time in the future in exactly the sense in which I intended them to be understood. I am quite sure there was no one in this House who was deceived in any way by what I said, nor did I intend that anybody should be. And, especially with regard to the proclamation with reference to the preparations of the voters' lists in the unorganized portions of the province of Ontario, the hon. gentleman must attribute to his fellow members in this House a degree of lack of perception beyond the ordinary if he supposes that anyone could think another would be deceived on a subject of that sort by what was said on Friday last with a proclamation on the subject appearing on Saturday. At the time I was speaking, on Friday, I was, of [DOT]course, perfectly aware of the fact that a proclamation was pending, that the proclamation had been prepared, and would appear in the ' Gazette ' of the following day. What that has to do with what I said upon the Friday I am not able to understand. With regard to the whole question of the preparation of the voters' lists _ in the unorganized territory I have nothing to add to or subtract from what I said on Friday. I am not here defendr ing the statute referred to; that statute is not at present under consideration. When it was before a previous parliament for consideration I defended it: I thought it

was proper legislation; I stated so then; I think_ so still; I state so still. It is an Act which is not now under the consideration of this House, the provisions of which need not be, so far as I can see, debated; at all events, it is not my intention to debate them. Under the statute, this parliament delegated to the judges of the district courts of that territory the duty of preparing the lists, having regard, as far as possible to the dates for the various steps prescribed by the provincial statute. Upon the judges that duty and responsibility rests, and that duty and responsibility is not being interferred with in any degree by the Minister of Justice, or, so far as I am aware, by any member of the government.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE IMPERIAL CONFERENCE.
Subtopic:   VOTERS' LISTS IN ORGANIZED DISTRICTS.
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July 25, 1911

Sir ALLEN AYLESWORTH.

If the hon. gentleman (Mr. Boyce) reiterates in .spite of what I said that I attempted to mislead the House, I have only to give that statement an unqualified denial.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE IMPERIAL CONFERENCE.
Subtopic:   VOTERS' LISTS IN ORGANIZED DISTRICTS.
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