Joseph GIRARD

GIRARD, Joseph

Personal Data

Party
Independent Conservative
Constituency
Chicoutimi--Saguenay (Quebec)
Birth Date
August 2, 1853
Deceased Date
March 30, 1933
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Girard
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ed48839a-21c1-4278-9fe2-7820f0a88b61&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Chicoutimi--Saguenay (Quebec)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  Chicoutimi--Saguenay (Quebec)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  Chicoutimi--Saguenay (Quebec)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
IND
  Chicoutimi--Saguenay (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 18)


August 16, 1917

1. How many soldiers have been enlisted in the district of Saguenay during the year 1916?

2. How many have been discharged?

3. How many of these soldiers are now in the military service?

4. How many of them are in England or at the front?

5. How many of them are yet in this country?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURN.
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August 16, 1917

1. What are the names of the officers who have done recruiting duty in the district of Saguenay during the year 1916-17?

2. What were their respective ranks?

3. During what period were they on recruiting duty?

4. What were the respective salaries of these officers?

5. What amount has been paid to each of them on account of salary and expenses respectively?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURN.
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July 13, 1917

Mr. GIRARD (translation):

Let us suppose a proclamation is issued during winter. As there is no possible means of communication with Clark City, on the island of Anticosti, it is therefore impossible to send them any news of this proclamation. Generally, there are between 600 and 1,000 men who work in the woods; these men come from almost everywhere and a large number of them -are from my district. I then understand, from the words of the hon. Minister of Justice, that this would he a case of impossibility, and there is no doing impossibilities.

Hon. 'Mr. DOHERTY (translation): I

understand that, if lit is impossible for those people to reach a tribunal, or for a tribunal to reach them, that is 'a case of impossibility.

Topic:   MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OP THE BIDE IN COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE HOUSE.
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July 13, 1917

Mr. GIRARD:

The hon. Minister states that the tribunals will -be as numerous as possible, according to population. With his leave, I will give him a few details as to these people's situation. Along the northern shore, there are villages of some 600 souls; others contain only a -score of -people and -some loealities where there would be only four or five families at -the -most. Without deprecating them, they are all fishermen who -are not wealthy, therefore the expense they will be -put to should -be reduced as -much as possible. It is for the cause's own success. Every thing is not accurately reported and I would like to have the interested parties absolutely satisfied as a result of the hon. minister's statements that they are fully protected. These small communities are sometimes scattered at a distance of some 60 miles from -quite an important centre; there -are some 75 and even 100 miles aw-ay. How are you going to reach those little villages very thinly populated; how do the Government intend to protect them, to save them from travelling expenses? Would it not be preferable for the tribunal to move from place to place?

Topic:   MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OP THE BIDE IN COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE HOUSE.
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July 10, 1917

Mr. J. GIRARD (Chicoutimi-Saguenay) (translation):

Mr. Chairman, I beg leave

to second the amendment offered by my hon. friend from Chambly-Vercheres (Mr. Rain-ville), to the exemption clause.

I think that, if the amendment offered by my hon. friend is not going to be applied to the exemption provisions, to which he wishes to apply it, it would be desirable to make the interpretation of the section clearer and to add to subsection, A after the words " in which he is habitually engaged " the following words: " The men engaged in agricultural and industrial pursuits and in the fisheries." I do not intend to embarrass the Government with this amendment, but in the preamble, the Government seems to be aiming at protecting the agricultural and industrial classes. The intention of the Government in that respect is open to doubt. I have received several letters and I think this subsection should be made plainer, so as to make perfectly clear what the real purpose of the Government is.

As remarked by the hon. member for Chambly-Vercheres, the intention of the Bill is not to conscript the whole man-power of the country, but only 100,000 men, and it matters little once those 100,000 men are enlisted, whether such or such a class is exempted, as what is needed is production and farmers engaged in sustaining the productivity of the Dominion, to support our own population and help supply the Allies.

Topic:   CONSIDERATION OF THE BILL IN COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE HOUSE.
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