Lewis Elston CARDIFF

CARDIFF, Lewis Elston

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Huron (Ontario)
Birth Date
January 22, 1889
Deceased Date
April 16, 1969
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elston_Cardiff
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=eb52e405-9f56-43e3-ab3e-e41da2f14356&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  Huron North (Ontario)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Huron North (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Huron North (Ontario)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Huron (Ontario)
  • Chief Government Whip (January 1, 1957 - January 1, 1958)
  • Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party (January 1, 1957 - January 1, 1958)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Huron (Ontario)
  • Chief Government Whip (January 1, 1957 - January 1, 1958)
  • Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party (January 1, 1957 - January 1, 1958)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Huron (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture (November 18, 1959 - November 17, 1961)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Health and Welfare (January 18, 1962 - April 19, 1962)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Huron (Ontario)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Huron (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 251 of 254)


May 1, 1941

Mr. CARDIFF:

These are my notes and I am making the speech. I have been in this house for some time now and I have not interrupted any member making a speech. There has hardly been a member opposite who did not read his speech in this debate, and the only reason I am sticking to my notes rather closely is that I have not had the educational opportunities that most lawyers have enjoyed.

What we need is to produce efficiently more supplies for our army and to equalize matters between the various groups so that all will share and share alike in the endeavour to beat the common enemy. What we need is the confidence and unity of the Canadian people in doing what is required in this war effort.

To give a concrete suggestion, we all know that the dairy industry is a major industry in this country and that butter, condensed and evaporated milk and fluid milk prices are influenced by the price of cheese. We know that Great Britain wants 112 million pounds of cheese from Canada in 1941, and more if possible. The solution seems to me a simple one, and if the Minister of Agriculture wants to do something, the facts are plainly before him. Farmers are not so dumb, but they just cannot keep on producing at a loss. They must have sufficient income to defray expenses and live, if nothing else, and I contend that this government must bolster up the morale of our rural

IMr. Cardiff.]

people if it expects to get the maximum war effort. An increase in the price levels will spur the farmers on to pile up the cheese figure, and that in turn will be reflected in the cream producing industry. The small bonus which the Minister of Agriculture has promised is just like a bone to a hungry dog. It satisfies only for the moment. Why cannot we have a minister who will forget politics in these trying times and give agriculture the attention it deserves? The farmers are waiting for the Minister of Agriculture to come down to earth. Instead of floating along as we are we should be producing to the maximum.

If Japan gets into the war and Australia and New Zealand are cut off from sending supplies to Great Britain, Canada will be required and should be prepared to meet the demand that will arise. We would be in a nice position if we were one year late in our endeavours! If we were allowed to send our surplus to the nations which are now in need we would have a ready market for all we could produce. Dumb as the Minister of Agriculture may think we are, price will be the factor in deciding how much and what products the farmer will produce. Give the farmer a reasonable profit on his main products, his dairy produce, beef, hogs, eggs and grain, and he will pay higher wages to his help and be a steady purchaser of war bonds and war savings certificates and stamps.

The morale of the rural people at present is at a low level. Something has to be done to raise it. The federal government has failed and failed badly so far to promote unity of purpose and effort in the war need. The Minister of Agriculture has lost the entire confidence of the average farmer. Coming from a rural riding and knowing the condition that agriculture is in, I insist that speedy action be taken before it is too late. There is a limit to the endurance of the farmer. There is not a shadow of a doubt in my mind that unless a change is made for agriculture, seventy-five per cent of the farms in Canada will be mortgaged for all they are worth. It will not only cripple this generation but will tend to cripple the next generation as well.

There are a few things I should like to know.

I should like to know from the Minister of National War Services, now that we no longer have an active minister of agriculture, why we farmers in Ontario have to pay $24 per ton for screenings. I understand these screenings are taken as dockage from the western farmer after he has paid the freight on them to the head of the lakes. They do not cost anything when they get that far, and yet when they get down to Ontario they cost us anywhere from $20 to

Supply-State of Agriculture

S24 per ton. I contend that we should be able to buy those screenings, plus freight and handling charges from the head of the lakes, anywhere in Ontario.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDER 28 THIS DAY TO PERMIT DEBATE ON MOTION OF MR. ILSLEY FOR COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY
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May 1, 1941

Mr. CARDIFF:

Eighteen Cooperative Commonwealth Federation and Social Credit members 'were in their seats, and only fourteen Liberal members, after the debate started, and the other, day, after the recess, only sixteen members opposite were in their seats. How in the name of goodness can you expect the government to do justice to agriculture when members have no interest in the subject? The fact that the agriculture committee has never had a meeting since parliament opened proves to me that agriculture, so far as this government is concerned, is the forgotten industry.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDER 28 THIS DAY TO PERMIT DEBATE ON MOTION OF MR. ILSLEY FOR COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY
Full View Permalink

May 1, 1941

Mr. CARDIFF:

I quote the hon. member for Victoria (Mr. McNevin) when he said, if we were assured by this policy that we would be able to buy cheap grain, it would not be so bad, "but we are not." We know from experience that feed such as screenings which costs less than nothing at the head of the lakes, by the time we get it down in Ontario, costs $24 per ton, or about $1.25 per hundred.

The minister claims that farm prices have improved slowly this last two years. Perhaps

Supply-State of Agriculture

so, but when we consider the price we have to pay for the things we must 'buy, the slight increase does not do us much good.

I should like to take just a few minutes to deal with the generous gift or bonus of $35,000,000 which is being handed over to the western farmer. I wish to deal with the matter in relation to the effect that it will have.

First, a very large portion of this bonus will go to those who are not in need and who have planned to make and are making the adjustments they are now being paid to make by this generous bonus of the government.

Secondly, the bonus in question will give very little help and very little assistance to the small producer of grain. It will force the grain grower of the west into the production of hogs, something he is not prepared to do or does not want to do unless he really has to. It will force him into an overproduction of coarse grains which will be hard to store and hard to get a profitable price for on account of freight charges. So far as I can learn many of these adjustments were being planned and would have been taken care of without such assistance; in fact I have been told that the western farmer never asked for any such bonus, and moreover did not want it.

You would have thought that the Saskatchewan government or the rural municipalities convention would have been the first to be consulted in regard to this new bonus before the Minister of Agriculture and the dominion government would have got into such a generous state of mind, but such was not the case. It came like a bolt from the blue without any consideration whatsoever being given to other parts of Canada.

The fact that the western farmer may be short of revenue, owing to his not being able to sell his wheat, will not warrant the throwing of 30 or 40 millions of dollars to the west without giving due consideration to the question where it is going or the effect it will have on Ontario or other parts of Canada as a whole.

I think the agriculture committee of this parliament should have been consulted in this regard. Here we have been sitting for over a year and the agriculture committee has never had one meeting. Has agriculture become of so little importance to this government that the committee on agriculture is no longer of any consequence? Surely the Minister of Agriculture has not become so efficient that he no longer needs to take advice on any matters pertaining to agriculture, or are the agricultural members in this house to be completely ignored? Surely the Minister of Agriculture should be the medium

through which we should be able to work out our many problems in a manner that would be at least satisfactory in part.

In conclusion, I suggest that we cannot expect much consideration from this government so far as agriculture is concerned, because when this debate started, or fifteen or twenty minutes after it started, only fourteen members out of 180 on the government side were in their seats.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDER 28 THIS DAY TO PERMIT DEBATE ON MOTION OF MR. ILSLEY FOR COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY
Full View Permalink

April 30, 1941

1. Does order No. 15 made under authority given by order in council P.C. 2138, May 23,

1940, and amended by order in council January 10, 1941, P.C. 143 prohibit the manufacture of cheddar cheese in Ontario and Quebec less in weight than seventy-five pounds for sale in Canada?

2. How many pounds of cheddar cheese were manufactured in Canada last year of sizes below that required by the above order?

3. Why does this order apply only to Ontario and Quebec?

Topic:   RESTRICTION OF WEIGHT OF CHEDDAR CHEESE MANUFACTURED IN ONTARIO AND QUEBEC
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April 28, 1941

1. How many persons have been engaged, (a) in a temporary, or (b) in a permanent capacity in the income tax division since September 1, 1939?

2. Were any of such persons assigned to duty by the civil service commission?

3. If so, how many?

4. By what person or persons was each person, not assigned to duty by the civil service commission, recommended to the Minister of National Revenue?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL REVENUE-INCOME TAX STAFF
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