Charles Edwin KAULBACH

KAULBACH, Charles Edwin

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
July 13, 1834
Deceased Date
May 25, 1907
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Edwin_Kaulbach
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=eb44ee89-ba9a-4c19-8685-b02feeadba1e&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, shipowner

Parliamentary Career

September 17, 1878 - May 18, 1882
CON
  Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)
October 10, 1883 - January 15, 1887
CON
  Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)
March 5, 1891 - April 24, 1896
CON
  Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)
June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
CON
  Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
CON
  Lunenburg (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 78)


March 21, 1905

Mr. KAULBACH.

Has the government purchased from a Boston firm or company a number of submarine signals ? If so, how many have been obtained ? At what price ? On whose recommendation were these submarine signals Mr. PREFONTAINE.

purchased ? In what countries are they in use, and to what extent ?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   $ 87,000 COMMONS
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August 8, 1904

Mr. KAULBACH.

I fully endorse the work done. The Halifax and 'Southwestern, from Halifax on to the county of Shelburne, will, I hope, meet with the expectations of the government. It is a very useful road, particularly for fishermen in the export of their fish to the west in cold storage. I am not criticising the construction of that road, because it will aid to develop the resources 1 of the country, but I still hope that my hon.

friend the Minister of Finance will see the necessity for a road from New Germany to New Boss and down the valley of Gold river, to conect with the Halifax and South western, and trust he will see his way clear to have that project carried out at the very earliest day.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
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August 8, 1904

Mr. KAULBACH.

The fact that the resolutions at present before parliament calling for so many and large appropriations for railway construction in various parts of this Dominion contain no appropriation for the northern end of the country which I have the honour to represent, so much deserving of aid, causes me great disappointment which I feel constrained to express. 1 made a request by letter in April last addressed to the Minister of Railways which was a rene'wal of previous requests, for a continuation of the line of railway from New Germany, where the Caledonia and Central Railway intersect to Foster Settlement and New Ross, and from thence by the valley of the Gold River to Chester basin, to connect with the Halifax and Southwestern Railway. I asked for a money appropriation for construction, and showed how essential this road was to the settlers along the line of route, as well as to open up and develop the resources of the country, rich in soil, lumber and mineral, it being as fine as any in Nova Scotia. I further showed that the proposed road would be a ready way to market, as well as have those people relieved of the torture they at present have to undergo, travelling over a highway, or portage road, very little better in some places than an open wilderness. I must here not omit to state that the scene along the proposed route is an everchanging panorama of splendid views, showing miles of romantic ride, and soil most productive ; the scene being interspersed with hill, glen, lake and stream-the latter well supplied with fish ; all vieing with each other to offer the greatest attraction for settlers. Bulletins are published offering very excellent farms in Ontario and the west ; but nothing is said of the vast areas of productive, arable soil in Nova Scotia. Fruit in Lunenburg county, particularly in the districts I have referred to-New Germany, Foster Settlement, New Ross, and the places adjacent-can be grown in abundance and that of a beautiful description. It is a lovely sight to witness the farmers' handsome orchards, trees bending under the weight of scarlet apples, luscious, juicy grapes, plums growing purple in the sunlight, and pears

vieing with each other for size. These in themselves contribute very largely to the comfort and wealth of the farmer and fruitgrower of these places when proper attention and skill are employed. The want of good roads and other facilities to reach a market, the people now occupying days in going to market and returning, is a great drawback to them, and most discouraging, whereas, with the facilities of railway transportation, time and space are overcome, money saved, and the promising youth of the country induced to remain, and settle at home, instead of going to the United States as they are now doing, seeking employment denied them at home, owing to the difficulties and inconveniences that beset them such as I have referred to. We are spending from day to day immense sums of money to -bring settlers from abroad to the Northwest, whereas by constructing a railway from New Germany to New Ross, giving accommodation to the adjacent settlements of New Burn, Woodstock and other settlements nearer home, we offer inducements for our youths to remain and build comfortable homes for themselves at a comparatively small expenditure of time and money, and, best of all an opportunity to receive a fair return for their labour. I hope I shall not be considered as viewing the condition of this subject with a microscopic eye for I can assure you, Mr. Chairman, that I know whereof I speak, having a practical knowledge of the capabilities of the country, and the conditions under which these people are suffering for the want of a railway.

Topic:   RAILWAY SUBSIDIES.
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August 2, 1904

Mr. KAULBACH.

Is that confined strictly to British Columbia waters ?

Topic:   FISHERIES ACT-AMENDMENT.
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July 28, 1904

Mr. KAULBACH.

It can easily be ascertained that there is very little shipping in some places where the dredges have been employed for the last few years.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   '$71 COMMONS
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