Jerry PICKARD

PICKARD, The Hon. Jerry, P.C., B.A., M.Ed.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Chatham-Kent--Essex (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 14, 1940
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerry_Pickard
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=e849c7f9-638b-42b8-ac7a-495f5ae20cb6&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
teacher

Parliamentary Career

November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
LIB
  Essex--Kent (Ontario)
October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  Essex--Kent (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (February 23, 1996 - July 9, 1997)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Kent--Essex (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (February 23, 1996 - July 9, 1997)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services (July 10, 1997 - July 15, 1998)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Chatham-Kent--Essex (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness with special emphasis on Border Transit (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Chatham-Kent--Essex (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness with special emphasis on Border Transit (December 12, 2003 - July 19, 2004)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry (July 20, 2004 - February 5, 2006)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 101)


October 19, 2005

Hon. Jerry Pickard

Mr. Speaker, what one has to realize is that Canada is one of the countries that has the lowest charge on energy around the world. We certainly have far lower prices than Europe. Anyone who has travelled to Europe, Asia or other countries knows the price paid for gas is far higher than it is in Canada.

Certainly we are not a perfect organization, but we have done everything we can to make certain that low income Canadians get the financial assistance they require. The government has announced a direct financial assistance program for low income Canadians of up to $5,000 per household to defray the costs of higher energy costs.

There is no question when we look at the EnerGuide formula that we will watch the prices to the consumer and try to make sure the consumer is well aware of why those prices are fluctuating. Canada is not a country where we put price controls on separate industries and that is not the general step to take. I believe it is to inform the consumer, keep the prices as low as possible and keep the supply working well in this country.

Topic:   Adjournment Proceedings
Subtopic:   Trade Compensation Act
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October 19, 2005

Hon. Jerry Pickard (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased today to begin the process of the report stage debate on Bill C-37, an act to amend the Telecommunications Act.

The bill would augment the powers of the CRTC to establish a more effective regime to protect the consumers against unsolicited telemarketing while protecting their privacy.

The bill provides the legislative framework for the creation of a national do not call list.

The bill enables the CRTC to do three things: first, impose fines for non-compliance; second, establish a third party administrator to operate a database; and third, give the ability to set fees to recover costs associated with maintaining the list.

Bill C-37 has been reviewed in detail by the Standing Committee of Industry, Natural Resources, Science and Technology. In its report to Parliament, the committee recommended amendments to the bill, including an exemption from the national do not call list for survey and polling firms for the sole purpose of collecting information from the general public

The committee's recommendations also required a caller to identify the purpose of the call and the person and organization on whose behalf the telecommunications are being made.

The committee recognized the importance of the survey and polling firms in collecting opinions of all Canadians to support research and to allow companies and organizations to make sound decisions.

However there are unintended consequences of these amendments for survey and polling firms that could possibly create unrepresentative samples of the Canadian public created by unreliable survey results. If survey and polling firms do not have the ability to contact all Canadians, this could create a misleading survey. The survey results would be, at best, a subset of Canadians, the opinions of individuals who are not on the do not call list, instead of capturing the views that represent all Canadians.

In addition, if a survey and polling firm has to identify on whose behalf the call is being made, the possibility of biasing the survey exists.

I am proposing the following amendment that further clarifies an amendment adopted by the committee by adding a new subsection 41.7(5) that would read:

notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, subsections 3 and 4 do not apply in respect of a person making a telecommunication referred to in paragraph 41.7 subsection 1(f).

As originally intended by the committee, survey and polling firms would be exempt from the do not call list and would continue to be allowed to collect information from all Canadians.

Also, there are a few housekeeping matters that need to be addressed. Section 41.1 of the bill, as introduced at first reading, stated “sections 41.2 to 41.5 create a legislative framework for a national do not call list”.

In its report to Parliament, the committee recommended amendments to the bill by adding new sections, sections 41.6 and 41.7. During the reprinting of the bill, section 41.1 was not updated to reflect the new sections added at committee.

Lastly, we are proposing administrative amendments to improve the French terminology for the national do not call list. I am proposing to amend section 41.1 to accomplish that. This amendment simply acknowledges the new sections of the bill adopted by the committee.

I urge the hon. members to support the amendments to the bill so that we move forward to give individual Canadians an easy way to curtail intrusive telemarketing while protecting their privacy.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Telecommunications Act
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October 5, 2005

Hon. Jerry Pickard (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, Lib.)

Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague across the way for his presentation. When we talk about pension funds and covering them in the manner that he has suggested, it raises a question in my mind and in the minds of many people. In trying to do something that is very helpful for workers, it could be very negative to workers. Financial institutions must lend money to businesses to keep businesses running. They must allow businesses to loan and borrow money to start new ventures and move forward.

If we stop and think about the methods of pension plans, if there is a shortfall in investment, for instance the stock market goes down and the pension funds were invested in the stock market, or the interest rates are not as high as required to pay the pensions, then people who lend money to small businesses might stop and think about whether they should continue to lend it or whether they should lend it at a much higher rate, which would curtail business dramatically in our country.

The Liberal government has looked at that pension plan and has said that it will ensure that any dollars collected by the employer, any inputs the employers have made, have to be paid before the settlement of bankruptcy, and they would receive a priority in that case. All funds that went to the pension plan must be brought up to date before that final settlement is made. That protects the workers in the most sincere way possible while not preventing loans to businesses and others.

We all have to be afraid. If small business does not have the money in investments, it will be unable to proceed. Everyone knows the biggest problem for small business is dollar flow or cash available for ventures moving forward.

Maybe in trying to help one way, we may hurt another way unintentionally. I would just leave that with the member to think about.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Wage Earner Protection Program Act
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October 5, 2005

Hon. Jerry Pickard (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, Lib.)

Madam Speaker, I really appreciate the presentation that I have just heard. It was dead on, in my opinion. Oftentimes both sides of the House do not agree.

The point the government has been trying to make is there needs to be balance. There needs to be balance between the workers, balance between the lenders and borrowers, balance that keeps jobs, balance that keeps our business flow in an appropriate system so that money will be lent, so that workers will be protected and so that the system works.

My colleague across the way presented his case so well. Does he see any other way to bring further balance to the system? Our goal was to bring balance, which I believe is there. There may be some added things my colleague could bring forward because he was so good on what he presented.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Wage Earner Protection Program Act
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September 30, 2005

Hon. Jerry Pickard (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the minister has acted totally responsibly. He will not start naming companies here in the House of Commons. However, he has said there will be zero tolerance in any breakage of any rules that are there. Every penny will be recouped by the government if any violations occurred.

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Technology Partnerships Canada
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