John Anderson FRASER

FRASER, John Anderson

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Cariboo (British Columbia)
Birth Date
April 4, 1866
Deceased Date
May 8, 1960
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Fraser_(British_Columbia_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=e7355539-4988-4766-a03d-159d4c385bf4&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant, teacher

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Cariboo (British Columbia)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Cariboo (British Columbia)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Cariboo (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 216)


March 28, 1935

Mr. FRASER (Cariboo):

I think we will have to take some measures to fix you.

The mineral production in British Columbia in 1934 amounted to 307,700 ounces of gold and' by the way let me remind my hon. friend from Vancouver Centre that the government did not impose a tax on placer mines, and placer gold mining is the principal industry in Cariboo. British Columbia, as I say, produced 307.700 ounces of gold in 1934, valued at $10,480,000, and prior to 1933 British Columbia had never produced over $6,000,000 in gold in any one year. In that same year, 1934, British Columbia produced

8,907,000 ounces of silver valued at $4,197,800;

340,700,000 pounds of lead valued at $8,313.080, and 49,400.000 pounds of copper valued at S3,566,630.

Let me give one other item with respect to the mining industry in Canada before I deal further with the province of British Columbia.

There are in operation in Canada at the present time seventy-three metallurgical mills reducing the ores of this country and extracting from them valuable metals. Of this number thirty-one are in Ontario, twenty-one in British Columbia, nine in Quebec, eight in Nova Scotia and four in Manitoba. Here is a remarkable thing, and I wish hon. members would take note of it and think over it for a few days and see what they feel about it. In all the seventy-three mills that are in operation in Canada at the present time the metallurgical processes in operation in each and every one of them have been passed on by the Department of Mines in the city of Ottawa. You have in the city of Ottawa to-day one of the most up to date and one of the most efficient mining departments that you can find anywhere in the world, and I think this government is to be congratulated on the efficiency of the staff which they have been able to secure to direct and experiment in connection with the mines of the Dominion of Canada. In British Columbia in January, 1933, we had eight of these mills in operation; at the end of 1934 there were seventeen, and at the present time there are twenty-one.

Just to give the house some idea of some of the mines we have out there in British Columbia let me call attention to the record of the Pioneer mine. The Pioneer mine in 1934 produced $3,045,000 in gold. It has produced altogether $7,957,800 in gold. It has paid in dividends $2,940,540. The Pioneer mine employs three hundred men and supports six hundred persons. Its milling capacity is 400 tons per day. In 1924 this property changed hands for $8,000. To-day its estimated value is $21,000,000. Listen to this, you speculators!

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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March 28, 1935

Mr. FRASER (Cariboo):

Well, we have

not heard it.

The Budget-Mr. Fraser (Cariboo)

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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March 28, 1935

Mr. FRASER (Cariboo):

In 1932 it was further reduced to $10.85; in 1933 to $7.23 and in 1934 $6.75.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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March 28, 1935

Mr. FRASER (Cariboo):

Order, Mr. Speaker, please. Listen to this. An investment of $100 in the Pioneer mine in 1925 is now worth $265,500.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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March 28, 1935

Mr. FRASER (Cariboo):

Then we have the following mines, all situated in the Cariboo district, Minto mine, Wayside, Taylor, Windpass, Grange Mine, Windfall, and Nicola, and scores of other mines which are only at the present time what you might call prospects.

A most remarkable phenomenon of the depression has been the implicit confidence that has been shown in gold all over the world. Wherever possible people converted their resources into currencies whose convertibility into gold seemed secure, and, when this convertibility was in doubt, into gold itself. Nobody has shown any reluctance to accept gold in settlement of debts. The demand for gold always seems to be greater than the supply. Governments, bankers and bullion merchants are ready to take all offerings. There seems to be no let up in the demand. Every gold mining engineer can now get employment. Prospectors range in every conceivable quarter of Canada, wherever traces of gold are indicated. Higher [DOT] prices of gold caused the producing companies to tackle low grade possibilities. The total output of gold has not risen appreciably, but the life of existing mines has been considerably extended. Let me say in that connection that the rise in the price of gold has made it possible for these low grade mines to continue and extend their operations. I do not know of any one factor in this country which could add so much to the stability of the country as the extension of that gold mining, because this is the history of gold mining in my own district:

The gold was first discovered and attracted people there. A large number of people came in to mine the gold; some of them were not successful and were attracted to the fertile areas of land in the district. They proceeded to clear those lands, and when the mines were worked out the lands were still producing. That is the history of gold in every part of the world. Wherever you find a gold mine you have a valuable asset for a little time, a wasting asset, but alongside it you will find valuable natural resources and land which will continue to produce for all time.

I have not said one-half, Mr. Speaker, of what I had intended to say; I have only got started, and I think you must have cut me off a little short.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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