Wilfrid LAURIER

LAURIER, The Right Hon. Sir Wilfrid, P.C., G.C.M.G., K.C., B.C.L., D.C.L., LL.D., Litt.D.

Personal Data

Party
Laurier Liberal
Constituency
Quebec East (Quebec)
Birth Date
November 20, 1841
Deceased Date
February 17, 1919
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilfrid_Laurier
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=e2f3ce71-bd81-4d34-8a08-56a140552231&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

January 22, 1874 - October 7, 1877
LIB
  Drummond--Arthabaska (Quebec)
October 8, 1877 - August 16, 1878
LIB
  Drummond--Arthabaska (Quebec)
  • Minister of Inland Revenue (October 8, 1877 - October 8, 1878)
November 28, 1877 - August 16, 1878
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • Minister of Inland Revenue (October 8, 1877 - October 8, 1878)
September 17, 1878 - May 18, 1882
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • Minister of Inland Revenue (October 8, 1877 - October 8, 1878)
June 20, 1882 - January 15, 1887
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
February 22, 1887 - February 3, 1891
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (June 23, 1887 - July 10, 1896)
March 5, 1891 - April 24, 1896
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (June 23, 1887 - July 10, 1896)
June 23, 1896 - July 10, 1896
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (June 23, 1887 - July 10, 1896)
July 11, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • President of the Privy Council (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Prime Minister (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
July 30, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • President of the Privy Council (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Prime Minister (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • President of the Privy Council (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Prime Minister (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Wright (Quebec)
  • President of the Privy Council (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Prime Minister (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Minister of the Interior (March 13, 1905 - April 7, 1905)
  • Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs (March 13, 1905 - April 7, 1905)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (January 6, 1906 - February 5, 1906)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • President of the Privy Council (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Prime Minister (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Soulanges (Quebec)
  • President of the Privy Council (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Prime Minister (July 11, 1896 - October 6, 1911)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (October 10, 1911 - February 17, 1919)
December 17, 1917 - February 17, 1919
L LIB
  Quebec East (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (October 10, 1911 - February 17, 1919)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 1744)


May 23, 1918

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Explain.

. Mr. DOHERTY: They consist in the elimination of what I believe to be the most important provisions of the Bill. As I have had occasion to say in regard to another similar question, I would very much prefer to word my motion in this way, that I submit for the moment to these amendments rather than that I concur in them. The provisions of the Bill dealing with the important subject of the raising of the age of consent, concerning which there was, I think, practical unanimity in this House-which, under present circumstances, I think may fairly claim to represent the public opinion of the country- have been stricken out by the Senate. I cannot truthfully say that I am prepared to concur in any action of that kind. On the other hand, there remain in the Bill provisions which have been earnestly asked for, particularly by persons interested in the guardianship and protection of the child, which I would be sorry to see fail of enactment. There are also provisions which have been urged upon me as of great importance to cure a grave evil, more particularly in British Columbia. I refer to the [DOT]clause amending the provisions with regard-to gambling. That, too, is an improvement in the law urgently needed which I would be sorry to see delayed. In order to avoid the postponement of the enactment of these provisions which are left to us-and I cannot but feel that the Bill in its main purposes fails of achieving its effect by reason of the action taken in the other House-I am prepared to accept these amendments.

I understand the reason moving the honourable gentlemen of the Senate in their action striking out these important clauses was mainly that they thought the cnange effected in the law was so serious that the Government should give it further consideration. And ! shall see to it, if I snonld be here in t'he coming session, that at the earliest possible moment these hon. gentlemen shall have an opportunity to reconsider the action which they have taken in this instance.

Amendments concurred in.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT.
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May 23, 1918

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

This Bill has only two clauses; the first clause is in these wards:

(1) Paragraph (g) of Section two of the War-time Elections Act, Chapter 39 of the Statutes of 1917, shall apply only to a General Election.

And the second clause is:

(2) This Act shall be deemed to have come into operation on the eighteenth of March in the year one thousand, nine hundred and eighteen.

This Bill is to come to the relief of my hon. friend the member for Lanark (Mr. Stewart), who was elected a few days ago. Section (g) of the War-time Elections Act, which is repealed by this Act, provides that the delay between the nomination day and the election day shall be one month, amending the general Act, which says that the-delay, or the space of time between the nomination and the election day shall be one week. The object of this amendment is to restore the former delay and to provide that the space of time between nomination day and election day -shall not bo one month, as it was during the - last election under the War-time Elections Act, but shall be one week. There was an election in the county of Lanark, owing to the death of our friend and member for this House, the late Dr. Hanna. The Order in Council ordering the issue of the writ was made on [DOT] the, 11th April, and the nomination day was fixed to toe on May 2, and the pfiling day on May 9. The election took place, the nomination being on the 2nd May and the poll on the 9th of May, and our colleague the present member was elected. But the whole election was against the law. The delay between nomination day and the polling day should have been, nor one week, but one month, and the second paragraph of this Bill is to validate the election. So far as the election of my hon. friend from Lanark (Mr. Stewart) is concerned, I have no objection that his election should be validated, but I have very strong objections to its being made valid in the way in which it is being made valid by this Bill, that is, by amending the War-time Elections Act. For my part, I would say that that Act should not be amended, it should he abolished altogether; it should

be repealed, and if the Government were ready, or saw fit, to repeal that Act I should have nothing to say about it. But unless they will do so-I will not discuss the question at length, but I wish to record my vote absolutely, at all stages, against this Act,, which I regard as an abomination, and, therefore, I move in amendment:

That all the words in the motion alter the word "that" be left out, and the following sub-situted therefor. 'ttn the opinion of this House the War-time Elections Act should be rerepealed."

Topic:   WAR-TIME ELECTIONS ACT AMENDMENT.
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May 23, 1918

Sir WILFEID LAURIER:

It would appear that most of these Orders in Council are purely technical, and so far as my information goes at the present time, they are unobjectionable. The objection of my hon. friend (Sir Sam Hughes) is well founded. We have to take these rather on trust than anything else. For my part I am satisfied, because I have looked at them, and possibly I am the only man in the House who has done so.

a.nd other soldiers and the dependents of those killed while on active service, and1 any other matters relating thereto or connected therewith, he commended to the consideration of the Government.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   PAYMENTS TO SIR CHARLES FITZPATRICK.
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May 23, 1918

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

No, not the late Government; the present Government. It may have a new complexion now but that is only a veneer; it is always the same old Government. They changed the words "travelling expenses" to "special allowance" and the right hon. the Prime Minister (Sir Robert Borden) made the statement lately that it was paid monthly. It so happened that in one or two years the Chief Justice was not called upon to attend the sitting of the Judicial Committee and on those years he had received the money. If the item had been left as it was before with the wording "travelling expenses" the money could only have been paid when there were travelling expenses, but it was changed to "special allowance" and there the matter stands to-day.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   EDITION
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May 23, 1918

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

This special

allowance to the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court to pay his travelling and other expenses while attending the sittings of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council goes back to the days when Sir Oliver Mowat was Minister of Justice. At that time the then Chief Justice, Sir Henry Strong, went to England to sit as a member of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council under an Act which had been passed by the Imperial Parliament inviting judges of colonial courts to sit with the members of the Judicial Committee. Their services were required especially fox colonial cases. The Government of that day, at the instance

of Sir Oliver Mowat, placed an. item in the Estimates of $2,500 to cover the travelling expenses of the Chief Justice.' I do not remember the exact wording of the item, but it was to pay the travelling expenses of the Chief Justice while attending the sittings of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, or some such wording as that. This item goes back to 1897. It was for travelling expenses. It appeared in the Estimates in that form until 1915 or 1916, when the item was changed from "travelling expenses" to "special allowance." Under this the Chief Justice received his travelling expenses to attend the court, when, in fact, he had not attended the court. Why this change was made from "travelling expenses" to "special .allowance" I do not know. That was not in my time. It was in the time of the present Government. What the explanation of it is I do not know.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   EDITION
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