Alfred Dryden HALES

HALES, Alfred Dryden, B.S.A.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Wellington (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 22, 1909
Deceased Date
February 22, 1998
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Hales
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=e1235191-27b8-4499-b7bd-eca2a725ad3b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
butcher and meat cutter, farmer, manufacturer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Wellington South (Ontario)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Wellington South (Ontario)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
PC
  Wellington South (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour (August 17, 1962 - February 6, 1963)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
PC
  Wellington South (Ontario)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
PC
  Wellington South (Ontario)
June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Wellington (Ontario)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Wellington (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 343 of 344)


February 12, 1959

Mr. A. D. Hales (Wellington South):

I rise at this late hour, Mr. Speaker, in these proceedings to take part in this very interesting debate. I should like to compliment the hon. member for Assiniboia (Mr. Argue) upon the very energetic and sincere manner in which he has introduced this bill. I would think that if the members of his party were in full accord with this bill they would lend more support to him than they have today.

Topic:   AMENDMENT TO PLACE CEILING ON INTEREST RATES
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February 3, 1959

Mr. Hales:

Do not misunderstand me, Mr. Speaker. The matter has importance, but having regard to the order of importance, I would think that there are others that should come first. At this particular time I think we should be thinking of the curtailment of government expenditures. Many of us were elected on the platform that we would watch government expenditures and would curtail them. By putting into force a bill such as this one and having all government negotiable documents printed bilingually, of necessity some expense will be incurred. Some may say that it is only trivial. It is only a small point but these small points add up to big totals. I still say it would be an added expense at this particular time.

I believe this bill is designed to extend the use of bilingualism and that it goes beyond the provisions of the British North America Act. If this attitude were adopted by ethnic groups, the result might well be multilingualism rather than bilingualism. What about all these other groups in our country who have their native tongues? Perhaps some of them would like to see cheques and government documents printed in their language. I think we must stop and consider this point with respect to its ultimate results. I would ask myself and hon. members of this house these questions: Is there a real need for this bill at the present time? What hardships, if any, are being created by the lack of bilingualism on any of the government money documents? What about people in the areas of Canada where French is spoken by a fairly high percentage? Is there any great suffering occurring among these people? How many folks, say in Quebec, would hand out a $10 bill for a dollar bill, or vice versa? I believe it has been stated here that the cheques of the C.B.C., and the seaway corporation and possibly the baby bonus cheques

Supply-Agriculture

are now printed bilingually. If this is the case, I cannot see the need for this bill at the present time.

As to these cheques to which reference is being made, even although they are printed in only one language, namely the English language, the figures appear as 10, 20, 30 or 40, whatever the amount may be; and those figures are the same in English or in French. I therefore do not think there is any great hardship on anybody with respect to these cheques being printed only in the English language.

I would suggest to my hon. friends and to the house that we should weigh this matter in the true light of its necessity at this particular time. I would think that the hon. member who introduced this bill would have been accomplishing something that met a greater need or would be of greater use to this country at this particular time if he had introduced a bill, as I intend to do at some later date, to provide that all cheques be of a standard size and that they will be standard in their printing. The name of the bank issuing them and the amount will appear in a certain place. The signature and everything about that cheque will be uniform. No matter where you go in Canada the size, the printing and everything about the cheque will be uniform. For those in business and those in banks who are obliged to handle thousands of cheques each day, this fact of having uniform cheques would, in my opinion, be the first step in this direction.

Topic:   FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PROVIDE FOR PRINTING OF NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS IN BOTH ENGLISH AND FRENCH
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February 3, 1959

Mr. Hales:

Let us get them uniform in size first. Then if the need arises, even more than I would humbly suggest it exists today, I will consider the bilingual aspect at a later date. I hope this matter will be given more serious consideration. I hope that time will be given us to study this matter and to look into it more thoroughly and that we shall make haste slowly.

Topic:   FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PROVIDE FOR PRINTING OF NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS IN BOTH ENGLISH AND FRENCH
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February 3, 1959

Mr. A. D. Hales (Wellington South):

Mr. Speaker, I rise at this time to take part in this debate concerning the printing of negotiable government documents in both the English and French languages. The previous occasion when this bill was brought before us was in the dying days of the 23rd session of parliament. It was brought forward for our attention on the Friday before the house prorogued, when we had very little time to discuss the issue, and the vote was sprung on us very quickly. As the hon. member for Parkdale (Mr. Maloney) said we, as politicians as he preferred to call us, have a duty to be frank in our thinking and in our discussions. I think if that were not the case, we would not be here.

This is a subject of great national importance and of national interest. It is an extremely controversial subject. At the outset, Mr. Speaker and members of the house, let me make it clear that I fully appreciate the thought that lies behind the British North America Act. I appreciate also the fact that these two races are living side by side in Canada and that they have managed to get along well. I am very proud to be a member of this party which, as was said a few minutes ago, was instrumental in having the money of our country printed in both languages. I am proud also of the fact that it was the Conservative party that installed the simultaneous translation system. Personally, I have found it to be of great help in following the debates that have taken place in this honoured house. I think, in addition, it has done much to maintain the attendance of the house and to arouse interest in all the debates that have occurred in French or English.

I appreciate also the fact that this bill refers to government documents only. The remarks I have to make, which may express a view contrary to some of the views already expressed, will certainly not be uttered in any spirit of animosity whatever. I assure my French-speaking friends in this house and outside of it that my thinking in this matter will be in no way whatsoever a reflection on their nationality. I would think that this bill is a matter that we should discuss carefully. I think we should give it a good hearing. As I have said before, and as one of the hon. members who has spoken has said, this is an extremely controversial subject. I would suggest, Mr. Speaker, that perhaps we should make haste slowly on this subject or that, as has been said, perhaps we should count to ten before we proceed. At this stage I am

wondering just how great is the importance of this bill at this present time when this country is confronted with great international problems. I refer to the race for supremacy of the air, in the days of the sputniks, and getting control of the orbits; our great problems of international trade; the economic war confronting us at this particular time; and all those matters which are of such great importance. I am wondering, Mr. Speaker, whether we should not be spending our time on such matters as these. I am wondering whether we should not be debating a subject which is perhaps more important just at the present time.

Topic:   FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PROVIDE FOR PRINTING OF NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS IN BOTH ENGLISH AND FRENCH
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January 19, 1959

Mr. A. D. Hales (Wellington South):

should like to ask the Minister of Agriculture what steps his department is taking to curtail the increasing spread of rabies disease, and if he would consider seriously paying compensation for those animals lost. In my riding this dread disease has reached alarming proportions, and the number of cases is very serious.

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO CONTROL AND COMPENSATION
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