Shirley MARTIN

MARTIN, The Hon. Shirley, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Lincoln (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 20, 1932
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Martin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=db5717d9-9a0a-4252-8107-5541dbd989e0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
business services manager, businesswoman

Parliamentary Career

September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Lincoln (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works (October 15, 1987 - September 14, 1988)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Caucus Chair (March 31, 1988 - November 29, 1988)
  • Minister of State (Transport) (September 15, 1988 - February 22, 1990)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Lincoln (Ontario)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Caucus Chair (March 31, 1988 - November 29, 1988)
  • Minister of State (Transport) (September 15, 1988 - February 22, 1990)
  • Minister of State (Indian Affairs and Northern Development) (February 23, 1990 - April 20, 1991)
  • Minister of State (Transport) (April 21, 1991 - June 24, 1993)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 49)


June 4, 1993

Mrs. Martin:

I do not need the hon. member's instruction on how I do my job or how I read my briefs. I am answering for the Department of Transport to the hon. member. I am telling him that the port of Churchill is open this year. It will stay open this year. We are working with the port, with the railways and with the members up there to ensure that whatever can be done for the port will be done.

June 4, 1993

Oral Questions EMPLOYMENT

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   PORT OF CHURCHILL
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June 4, 1993

Hon. Shirley Martin (Minister of State (Transport)):

Madam Speaker, the government is not standing in the way of any high-tech development in western Canada or any place in the country.

This consortium has not come to the Department of Transport for any financial assistance for what it is trying to do. It is a group of private citizens who have come together to make new business.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   PORT OF CHURCHILL
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June 1, 1993

Hon. Shirley Martin (Minister of State (Transport)):

Madam Speaker, I too would like to join my colleague from across the floor to pay tribute to Gordon "Chub" Barrett who was the member of Parliament for Lincoln, as was stated, from 1968 to 1972. The boundaries were slightly different at that time from what they are today, but it was still the riding of Lincoln that he served.

Mr. Barrett made a great contribution to Canadians not only in his public life where he served as reeve and warden and then came to Parliament to serve his people of Lincoln here in Ottawa, but he also served the needs of people in his private life.

When he worked at the Thorold Paper Company it was as a safety inspector looking after the safety of his employees. He looked after the safety of Canadians when he served overseas with the infantiy. When he left he still kept a very active role in safety areas within the community.

When he left this House he continued to serve his country and his area on the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority from 1973 to 1980. This was at the time of its heyday in the volume of traffic through the seaway and certainly through the Welland canal at which time the tunnel was built under a road by the canal where Mr. Barrett lived.

He represented the needs of the Welland canal and the Niagara area in the St. Lawrence seaway as a whole and continued to serve his country.

Just as an aside, he also left a mark in Ottawa when he left the seaway. In talking to his secretary, Velma

Government Orders

Durant, who served with him at the seaway, she told me he left 12 ties behind when he left his office. They are still in the seaway office in Ottawa.

Mr. Barrett will be remembered by those at the St. Lawrence Seaway Authority and those people he represented as well.

We offer our condolences to his family who I know will miss him sadly.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE LATE GORDON "CHUB" BARRETT
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May 12, 1993

Hon. Shirley Martin (for the Minister of Transport) moved

that Bill C-121, an act to amend the Canada Shipping Act and to amend another act in consequence thereof, be read the second time and referred to a legislative committee in the Economics envelope.

She said: Madam Speaker, I am pleased to be present in this House today for second reading of the government's latest initiative under the green plan, Bill C-121, an act to amend the Canada Shipping Act and to amend another act in consequence thereof.

This legislation forms a part of the marine environmental emergencies response strategy announced in June 1991 and will accomplish a number of tasks. For instance, the bill will oblige the private sector to fund further improvements to marine spills response capability, increase the maximum fine for polluters to $1 million from $250,000, and authorize the adoption by Canada of the international convention on oil pollution prepared-

May 12, 1993

ness, response and co-operation and the international convention on salvage.

As members of this House know, the public review panel on tanker safety and marine spills response capability in its November 1990 final report made 107 recommendations, some with far-reaching policy implications, concerning Canada's ability to prevent and respond to marine spills.

Not all of the panel's recommendations have required new legislation, and the government has taken action to address the majority of the panel's concerns. For example, after July of this year Canada will require that new tankers operating in Canadian waters have a double hull or equivalent design feature, and that existing tankers be either retrofitted or phased-out on an established schedule.

Among other things, the government has also increased the level of foreign vessel inspections, expanded aerial pollution surveillance of the east and west coast and improved training programs. Despite this progress, some tasks cannot be accomplished without new legislation.

For example, the panel pointed out that the greatest risk of oil pollution damage to our waters comes not from Canadian ships but from vessels of other nations. That is the reason it has stressed the need for greater international co-operation and a more effective international regime for prevention of and response to marine spills.

This legislation will permit Canada's accession to the international convention on oil pollution preparedness, response and co-operation, also known as the OPRC convention. This convention which Canada helped develop and is committed to implementing will help ensure greater international co-operation for response to major marine spills.

This legislation also addresses the need for international rules on salvage which better reflect the need for protection of the marine environment. Both international and Canadian marine law concerning vessel salvage have traditionally been based on the principle of "no cure, no pay". Under this principle, salvors are only entitled to a reward if their efforts to salvage a vessel are successful. Unsuccessful efforts, no matter how skilled

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or diligent, receive no compensation whatsoever, and no consideration is given to the protection of the environment.

This legislation will implement as Canadian law the provisions of the international convention on salvage, and will effectively change the centuries-old principle of "no cure, no pain" by providing for special compensation for salvors whose efforts succeed in preventing or minimizing pollution damage.

The salvage convention will greatly enhance marine environmental protection. I am proud to ask this House to bring into force a mechanism which will, in the words of the public review panel on tanker safety:

Encourage salvors to prevent, minimize or clean up pollution.

Neither the OPRC nor the salvage convention has yet entered into force internationally. Canada therefore has an opportunity, by being among the very first countries to ratify these conventions, to lead by example, hastening the day when they become part of international marine law.

While this legislation will indeed strengthen the international regime it is concerned primarily with the protection of the marine environment through improved domestic spills response capability.

This legislation will introduce a new regime for responding to oil and petroleum spills that places the responsibility for clean-ups where it belongs, with the polluter. Ships and designated oil handling facilities will be required to pre-plan for spill response and enter into arrangements with private sector funded response organizations to respond to any spills that occur. Plans will have to meet standards set by the government, which will closely monitor private sector response to spills.

It should be said that these new improvements are being made in a spirit of partnership with the private sector and as a result of two years of extensive consultation with the industries affected.

This partnership approach to improving spill response will result in a regional capability for response to spills of up to 10,000 tonnes, and a national capability for response to spills of up to 25,000 tonnes. Those are the very figures recommended by the public panel review.

These are not hypothetical improvements. This legislation clearly sets out government and industry's respon-

May 12, 1993

Government Orders

sibilities and provides for severe penalties for those potential polluters who do not pay and do not comply.

In addition to putting the responsibility for spill preparedness on potential polluters, this bill strengthens the government's ability to ensure swift and effective response to oil spills. If a ship, oil handling facility or response organization proves incapable of mounting a response the minister, through the coast guard, can and will assume control of the response and take any action necessary to prevent, repair, remedy or minimize oil pollution damage. We will also expand the powers of our pollution prevention officers, who form Canada's front line defence against marine pollution.

In the future, the minister's costs for directed cleanups may be recovered from the ship-source oil pollution fund, which will in turn recover costs from the polluter. This new system will ensure that the cost of clean-up does not impede the immediate and effective response.

We will also quadruple the maximum fine for pollutant discharge offences to $1 million and provide for the jailing of marine polluters. Those who would, for profit, endanger the marine environment will learn that this government means business.

We will also provide for greater flexibility in sentencing polluters, as recommended by the public panel review. This legislation introduces a set of guidelines which may be used in imposing a sentence.

The public review panel also suggested a variety of sentencing options beyond imprisonment or fines, such as requiring polluters to publish information relating to the conviction or contributing to research. This legislation will empower the courts to direct convicted polluters to take any action that the court considers likely to prevent the offender from committing the offence again.

I should add that the penalties I mentioned previously are in addition to a shipowner's civil liability under the Canada Shipping Act for costs and damages arising from a ship-source oil spill.

In closing, allow me to reiterate that Bill C-121 is an important element of the government's response to the

public review panel's report, and clearly demonstrates both the government and the private sector's commitment to a cleaner, safer marine environment as well as a sound and prosperous economy.

We must put these measures in place and continue the work described by the public review panel in the title of its final report, that is the work of Protecting Our Waters. Therefore I would call upon my hon. friends opposite to join in a constructive debate and deal as quickly as possible with this very important legislation.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA SHIPPING ACT
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April 26, 1993

Hon. Shirley Martin (Minister of State (TVansport)):

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to be able to confirm for the hon. member that I have directed officials that no aerobatic flights will be allowed in the air space over St. Andrews airport. The only exception will be one day a year for the aerobatic competition. I understand that is acceptable to both the member and his constituents. At the same time, Transport Canada officials in the region are working with the Manitoba Air Flying Club to make sure that they can find a suitable arrangement for them to do their practising in other air space in the Manitoba area.

April 26, 1993

Oral Questions

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIR SAFETY
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