Vincent DUPUIS

DUPUIS, The Hon. Vincent, Q.C., B.C.L.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Chambly--Rouville (Quebec)
Birth Date
January 22, 1889
Deceased Date
May 11, 1967
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_Dupuis
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=d61f7675-ca36-4f5a-ba94-aa6f818f3d8a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

July 22, 1929 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Laprairie--Napierville (Quebec)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Laprairie--Napierville (Quebec)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Chambly--Rouville (Quebec)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Chambly--Rouville (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 271)


August 12, 1944

Mr. DUPUIS:

Then how do you understand it?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROGRESS IN SETTLEMENT OF MONTREAL TRAMWAYS STRIKE
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August 12, 1944

Mr. DUPUIS:

Who said that?

Topic:   THE WAR
Subtopic:   TOLICY OF THE GOVERNMENT IN MAINTAINING
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August 12, 1944

Mr. DUPUIS:

Yes, if it is one of a large family, because I am basing those figures on a family of eight children. As this child gets older it receive^ a greater allowance. According to the census figures, Ontario has almost twice as many families with one, two, three and four children as there are in the province of Quebec; therefore I do not see why some hon. members should complain and say that this legislation is intended to benefit Quebec only. That is not fair.. We have heard complaints from the hon. member for Parkdale. I knew him by reputation hefore he came here and I had regard for his personality when he was representing the king as lieutenant governor of Ontario. When you meet him intimately you realize that it would be hard to find someone more refined than he. I am sure he will admit, when he considers the figures I have just given, that this law is not made for one province only, that it is for the whole country.

Let me say in all sincerity that in bringing down this legislation the Prime Minister is between two fires. There are two sets of critics. One set is illustrated by this newspaper which is distributed among the farmers. Its criticism of this legislation is that it does not go far enough. It states in particular that the legislation is intended to help the well-to-do people. That criticism is insincere, because they ought to know that when the head of a family earns more than $1,200 per year he is subject to income tax. Now he may deduct $108 a year for each child. If he receives $8 a month for a child, that totals $96 for the year and he will have to refund $96 out of the $108. That is the type of criticism the Prime

Family Allowances

Minister has to face. As a member from that province I receive letters of complaint all the time from people who are not well-informed. I consider it my duty to rectify the mistaken ideas that may exist. As the leader of the opposition has pointed out, there are a good proportion of large families in Ontario. Every one of those families will receive the family allowances.

Every hon. member of the committee knows that the purpose of this bill is not to, pay the full expenses of bringing up a child. It is to help, it is a grant to large families. A family of eight children ranging from two to fifteen years will receive $528 per year. That will be a great help to the head of the family. He can use it to build a better home, or if he intends to rent, he can obtain a home possessing more hygienic facilities. If one of his children shows special talents he will be able to keep him in school longer than he otherwise would. There are many things that the fathers of our families will be able to do with this grant.

I talk with knowledge on this matter. I know there are many heads of families in my own district who will be delighted to receive these allowances. It will be just found money: tresor trouve. Those who understand the laws of psychology and sociology will understand the benefits to be derived. These people understand the danger in the present movement against the capitalists. This dangerous underground1 movement is going on from the west to the east; it is pervading the whole world. Our legislators should try to prevent this movement from coming to the surface and getting hold of the administration of our country. We should have parties based on sound principles of government. This country should be governed , by either the Tories or the Grits. I am frank about that.

Let us be sociologists. Let us work together to try to help the larger families. Let us be willing to, take a few pennies out of our pockets to enact this social security measure. The families in Quebec did not expect to get this legislation. If we were not in the midst of such a terrible struggle I think I could say something that would open the ears of my colleagues about the patience of the people of Quebec. We are patient. We did not ask for this legislation. Our sociologists came here and suggested that this would be a good policy, but we never made any threats as to what we would do if we did not get this legislation. It comes as a gratuity and the fathers of our large families will be very much pleased.

I recall the day when I was a young fellow. I was the fourteenth boy in a family of seventeen and I am proud of it. Had my father, who was a very humble farmer, lived to this day I know he would send a letter of thanks to the Prime Minister of this country for giving him help in raising his family. What did he do? At the age of thirteen years he gave me my inheritance. Do hon. members know what it was? It was the king's highway. That farm is very narrow but it is very long and full of hardships. I am glad that I followed that road. When I was passing through those difficult times I said to myself that whatever talents Providence would give me would be used to help relieve the hardships of others. If I am to leave public life, the fact that I have contributed by my vote toward the passage of this measure to help the young children of large families make their way in life, will make me feel that my, life will not have been in vain.

Topic:   FAMILY ALLOWANCES
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR PAYMENTS IN RESPECT OF CHILDREN UNDER SIXTEEN
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August 12, 1944

Mr. DUPUIS:

If my calculation is correct, between birth and the sixteenth birthday a child will receive an average of 85.28 per month.

Topic:   FAMILY ALLOWANCES
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR PAYMENTS IN RESPECT OF CHILDREN UNDER SIXTEEN
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August 12, 1944

Mr. DUPUIS:

And reduce the old age

pension age!

Topic:   FAMILY ALLOWANCES
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR PAYMENTS IN RESPECT OF CHILDREN UNDER SIXTEEN
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