Emmanuel Berchmans DEVLIN

DEVLIN, Emmanuel Berchmans, K.C., B.A., B.C.L., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
Laurier Liberal
Constituency
Wright (Quebec)
Birth Date
December 24, 1872
Deceased Date
August 30, 1921
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmanuel_Berchmans_Devlin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=d5f57ebd-8d4c-4446-8069-990c372443b3&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

February 13, 1905 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  Wright (Quebec)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Wright (Quebec)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Wright (Quebec)
December 17, 1917 - August 30, 1921
L LIB
  Wright (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 223)


March 15, 1921

Mr. DEVLIN:

I certainly do not rise to encourage any extravagance at this time;

I know that the country cannot afford to spend too much. But I see that a great deal is being expended in agricultural salaries one way and another, and I desire again to call the attention of the Minister of Agriculture to the fact that year in and year out, on the floor of the House, I have been asking his careful attention to the study of the agricultural condition in the

northern part of the county of Wright,-

I do not mean its extreme north, because it extends almost to the North Pole. The county is very large, and it afforded me much pleasure to be present last fall at an exhibition held in Maniwaki, which is about 98 miles from Ottawa. The exhibition was a great credit to the place. It brought numerous exhibitors together and demonstrated just what could be produced in the way of agricultural products as far north as anything could grow. They have put up a building there, in the construction of which I understand the Government has aided. I marvelled at the building they were able to erect for the sum of money which it actually cost. In another portion of the county, in the town of Aylwin, there is always a splendid exhibition, but, of course, it is the most populous part of the county. At that exhibition they show stock, poultry, and field products, and it has been of immense benefit it the people living in the lower end of the county. I have found that agricultural lectures serve a great purpose, and I have particularly requested an experimental station, or rather two. There could be a station at one end of the county, and another up north. It seems a lot to ask for, but it would result in incalculable good. I do not want to increase expenditures unnecessarily, for I believe in economy; but owing to the varied conditions in that county, to its altitude in certain parts, at least two experimental stations are necessary, one in the northern, and the other in the lower part of the county. I speak now for the county of Wright; not for that part of the county which, up to 1917, was included in Wright, and which is known to-day as the county of Hull.

Topic:   AUDITOR GENERAL'S REPORT
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March 8, 1921

Mr. DEVLIN:

I do not think I am

making a wrong guess.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES-ST. LAWRENCE DEEP WATERWAY TRANSPORTATION
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March 8, 1921

Mr. DEVLIN:

Not for political reasons.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES-ST. LAWRENCE DEEP WATERWAY TRANSPORTATION
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March 8, 1921

Mr. DEVLIN:

But the county has been all divided.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES-ST. LAWRENCE DEEP WATERWAY TRANSPORTATION
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March 8, 1921

Mr. E. B. DEVLIN (Wright) :

I have listened with a great deal of interest to the speech of my hon. friend from Port Arthur (Mr. Keefer) and I find that his resolution calls for a special committee consisting of an unspecified number of members for the consideration and investigation of the benefits to be derived from a deep waterway for transportation from the Great Lakes to the sea by way of the St. Lawrence river. The House is very well aware of the fact that a similar commission was appointed some years ago to study the water-powers, the water levels, and the whole question which my hon.

friend would like to have investigated at the present time, and that that commission decided at the time, after a study of the St. Lawrence waterway, that the only possible settlement of the transportation question by way of water would be from the Great Lakes down through the Ottawa river to Montreal.

There were very many reasons adduced in favour of the project, some of which my hon. friend (Mr. Keefer) has mentioned this evening. I recall the discussion of this matter in this House upon different occasions. I remember it was pointed out that our Nova Scotia coal could not get farther west than Montreal owing to the expense of its carriage by rail; but that by the construction of the Georgian Bay Canal, Nova Scotia, coal could be transported up the Ottawa river. The great advantage of the Ottawa River route over the St. Lawrence route, which my hon. friend endorses to-night, is that it would give the whole of the upper Ottawa country, and all the lands within reach of the Ottawa river, a chance of being developed. There are untold natural resources in that country, but they cannot be developed and the products carried out at present because of the expensive rail rates. This is a story that many members of the House are familiar with. Still there are a considerable number who were not in Parliament when the discussion of the Georgian Bay Canal project invariably formed part' of the proceedings of the House on one, if not two days of each session. My hon. friend surely would not like to see set aside the recommendation of the commission which the Government appointed to inquire into this project, and whose report is a wonderful work which must be in the Library of Parliament; I know I would not be without a copy of it in my own home. Surely he would not ignore the surveys which were then made of the whole of the waterway system from the Great Lakes down, and in which due account was taken of the possible electrical development. The power development possible on the St. Lawrence system does not begin to compare with that capable of being developed through the medium of the water powers along the Ottawa river., Many people have mistaken the idea of the Georgian Bay canal by imagining that it is proposed to con-truct a canal from one end of the system to the other. The canal system is a very small part of the project. There are a

great many natural water courses along the route and out of approximately four hundred miles, if I remember correctly, there would be but very few miles of canal system to be constructed. My hon. friend from Port Arthur would ^njoy, through the Georgian Bay system, all the facilities that he would have if the system which he has so eloquently advocated tonight were built. I really would not like to embarrass the Government hut I am sure that the hon. Minister of Public Works (Mr. McCurdy) is now telling the Prime Minister that his department is already in possession of the reports, plans and surveys made in the past of the water ways along the proposed Georgian Bay Canal route; and that department is perfectly familiar with the matter.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES-ST. LAWRENCE DEEP WATERWAY TRANSPORTATION
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