James SINCLAIR

SINCLAIR, The Hon. James, P.C., B.Sc., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Coast-Capilano (British Columbia)
Birth Date
May 26, 1908
Deceased Date
February 7, 1984
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Sinclair_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=d59901cd-17d4-4346-9114-11a9957eaea7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
civil engineer

Parliamentary Career

March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Vancouver North (British Columbia)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Vancouver North (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance (January 19, 1949 - April 30, 1949)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Coast-Capilano (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance (July 11, 1949 - October 14, 1952)
  • Minister of Fisheries (October 15, 1952 - June 20, 1957)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Coast-Capilano (British Columbia)
  • Minister of Fisheries (October 15, 1952 - June 20, 1957)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
LIB
  Coast-Capilano (British Columbia)
  • Minister of Fisheries (October 15, 1952 - June 20, 1957)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 790 of 793)


March 16, 1944

Mr. SINCLAIR:

I think the war in the Pacific will involve more than a few sheds and a government pier. I suggested the other evening that the great harbour space in North

Vancouver could be used. It is not a matter of building docks when the war actually develops out there.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE (NAVAL SERVICE)
Full View Permalink

February 28, 1944

Mr. SINCLAIR:

I should like to say a few words on the subject of airmail service to the forces. Not only have I sent mail to the forces, but, like the hon. and gallant member for Nanaimo (Mr. Chambers), I have received a fair amount overseas. I compliment the minister upon the steady improvement in the postal service to the army, the air force and the navy overseas in the last two years. Actually, the provision of a quick mail service to the men in combatant zones is not quite so easy as some armchair critics in Canada think it is.

I have one or two little suggestions to offer the minister, first of all, about airmail letter cards, which are the most effective way of getting mail to the troops. My first objection to the Canadian form is the awkward way in which it is prepared as far as writing is concerned, because of the manner in which it is folded. One writes a little bit here, a little bit somewhere else and a little bit over on the back. The British, who started the system, have an easier way. They make one fold in the paper; it is the same sized paper, and one writes as one would an ordinary letter. The second suggestion is that the minister should revise the rates for sending these things. The leader of the opposition has suggested that perhaps all soldiers' mail should go free airmail. That is an admirable suggestion, but

I do not think it is a practical one. If you saw the amount of mail coming back you would realize that we would have to divert half the bomber group overseas to carry mail back. I think, however, that all Canadian service men overseas should have an opportunity of sending at the British overseas rate. The British man outside the country can send one of these things to Britain for threepence and the civilian in Britain sends one back for sixpence, just as we pay ten cents. A great number of Canadian soldiers in Britain must pay the sixpenny rate. In the far east and middle east we pay threepence to send one of these to Canada and from Great Britain sixpence. I suggest to the minister that he make an investigation to see whether the Canadian troops overseas could not send these airmail letter cards to Canada for threepence.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Full View Permalink

February 28, 1944

Mr. JAMES SINCLAIR (Vancouver North):

Mr. Speaker, I had not the privilege of being in the house on Friday evening, but I should like to associate myself with every word uttered by the minister as reported on page 901 of Hansard with respect to this matter.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. COLDWELL REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24
Full View Permalink

February 28, 1944

Mr. SINCLAIR:

There is no rationing of these cards to civilians either in Canada or in Great Britain, but our Canadians in the middle east and the far east get a ration of only one a week. I suggest that there should be no ration. As hon. members know, the mothers and sweethearts in this country are sending bundles to Canadians to supplement the ration. I urge that there should be no ration to the men in the middle east and the far east.

May I refer to the cigarette situation. When I was first overseas there were many complaints about cigarettes, and there was undoubtedly a considerable loss both on convoy and by pilfering not only in the regular but in the army post office. I commend the minister for the way in which he cleared up that situation. Every cigarette package now coming is registered, and when it is opened by the orderly in the unit a check-up is made. Recently there

Sup-ply-Post Office

has been little loss in cigarettes delivered overseas. There is considerable delay, but, after all, parcel post going forward is not nearly as important as the letters themselves. I was interested in what the leader of the opposition said regarding the scarcity of cigarettes. It is true that some men are more fortunate than others in having more friends to send cigarettes to them, but I wish to pay a tribute to the service clubs, labour unions and various other organizations throughout the country who have contributed so heavily to provide cigarettes free for almost every Canadian overseas. If I may refer to my own experience with the Windsor City squadron, the city took such good care of us that I suggest to the minister that one of the problems which will have to be faced in connection with rehabilitation w'hen the war is over is that of teaching our chaps to buy their own cigarettes again after getting cigarettes free for so long.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Full View Permalink

February 11, 1944

Mr. JAMES SINCLAIR (Vancouver North):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of National Defence for Air or his parliamentary assistant. Yesterday the minister inferme'd the house that he is now holding discussions with representatives of the British air ministry on matters affecting the R.A.F. and the R.C.A.F. There is one matter which is of great interest to all Canadian airmen serving overseas, that is, the transfer to the R.C.A.F. of Canadian airmen who enlisted in the R.A.F. either prior to or subsequent to the declaration of war. These men have given heroic service and have added great lustre to Canada's name. I ask the minister or his parliamentary assistant if consideration is being given in these discussions to the transfer of Canadians in the R.A.F. to the R.C.A.F.

Topic:   ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Subtopic:   TRANSFER OF CANADIAN PERSONNEL FROM ROYAL AIR FORCE TO R.C.A.F.
Full View Permalink