Charles Edward REA

REA, Charles Edward

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Spadina (Ontario)
Birth Date
October 29, 1902
Deceased Date
August 31, 1965
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Edward_Rea
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=d28e8d96-b4ee-4dde-a595-3aba8119c222&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
insurance agent

Parliamentary Career

October 24, 1955 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Spadina (Ontario)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Spadina (Ontario)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Spadina (Ontario)
  • Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole (May 12, 1958 - June 7, 1961)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 408)


October 31, 1978

Mr. Ren6 Matte (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Standing Order 43, I ask for the unanimous consent of the House to present a motion on an important and urgent matter.

Considering the necessity of showing all the required objectivity in the discussions on the position of Quebec in the present Canadian federalism; considering that as full Canadian citizens Quebeckers pay federal taxes and that they are not unanimously prepared to see their money spent for political purposes, possibly against their constitutional option; considering that it would be to the benefit of all Canadians to know and study all the realities of the country without any passion, prejudice or electoralism to inquire on the best constitutional formula which could satisfy both major nations which make up this country, and because this option could be the establishment of a new Canada which would be in line with the diversity itself; and considering that the special committee co-ordinated by Mr. Tellier, from the federal-provincial relations branch seems to be used first of all for the political polemic against a government which was elected democratically, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Temiscamingue (Mr. Caouette):

That the federal-provincial relations branch be transformed into an advisory office for objective consultation without any partisanship, to which supporters of the main constitutional formulas presently put forward could refer in all objectivity.

Topic:   FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS PROPOSAL THAT FEDERAL-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS BRANCH BE TRANSFORMED INTO ADVISORY OFFICE-MOTION UNDER S O. 43
Full View Permalink

October 17, 1978

Mr. Ren6 Matte (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, I will say just a few words during the presentation of this legislation. I just want to remind hon. members that when we are considering such a proposal, we should stop and think and ask why, for instance, in 1978, in a civilized country as advanced as ours, in a civilization which has some claims to progress and to development in every respect, how it happens that we have again to resolve through coercion such a simple problem as the services to be provided to a population. We should wonder why we have not yet found a means to prevent so many workers from relying on blackmail, which is what all those strikes are, as well as to prevent the government from resorting to more or less honest procedures which are very often childish, to say the least.

Mr. Speaker, we should certainly have found by now the means to prevent this situation from occurring. We should not try to find someone to blame. We should not try to find out precisely who is responsible for the situation, but rather, Mr. Speaker, we should find the means to settle this once and for all. This kind of blackmail should not exist in 1978. Such childishness should not occur in negotiations in 1978. Both parties should understand that there are strict rules that must be obeyed concerning ethics, respect and basic good manners. It is possible to assert your rights and even request certain privileges without annoying millions of people who need their mail. It is very well to request all that you desire, whether it be salary increases or better working conditions, but there is no need to do so by causing all sorts of disastrous problems for your neighbours.

Mr. Speaker, we must be sufficiently civilized to discover finally a basic formula which can eliminate all strikes in this country, to develop formulas, laws and regulations which can command respect. We now have a problem because our legislation and the principles behind it are inadequate and because no one wants to respect them. If only we really wanted to solve not only this problem and the present postal conflict, but all other similar problems because of which our population could not care less about problems! It is terrible, but this is what we have come to. How many times in the past have we seen people prepare themselves in anticipation of a future strike? For instance, the present strike does not bother at all those who have enough money to use special paid messenger services. Yes, we are so used to this situation that we have finally provided all sorts of alternatives in our own system. And while this goes on, we, the legislators duly mandated by the people, discuss another band-aid solution. Once again we discuss the means to solve a problem in the short term without thinking about the need to find a permanent solution.

198

October 17, 1978

Postal Services

Mr. Speaker, I believe that all this had to be said in this House during the debate on this bill. Of course, I agree that this problem must be solved. I agree completely as to the need to do so. However, what I want most is for us to insist from now on on finding the means to eliminate this situation so that we shall have fulfilled in this House our true responsibility towards the people we represent.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   POSTAL SERVICES CONTINUATION ACT
Full View Permalink

May 4, 1978

Mr. Ren6 Matte (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, under the provisions of Standing Order 43, I ask for the unanimous consent of the House to move a motion dealing with an important matter of pressing necessity.

Considering the concern which the government should show in promoting industrial and economic development in all Canadian regions; considering that it costs between $5 and $16 more per ton to import copper concentrate from British Columbia to Noranda than it costs to export that same concentrate from British Columbia to Japan; considering that the company in Noranda would need 100,000 additional tons of concentrate in 1978 and that stock is available in British Columbia, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Rimouski (Mr. Allard):

That, given the present circumstances, the federal government negotiate a reduction of $10 per ton for the importation of up to 100,000 tons per year of copper concentrate from British Columbia to Quebec and that the federal government set a two-year freeze on cost increases to ship iron ore on the St. Lawrence Seaway to assess the economic impact of such decision.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED REDUCTION IN COST OF COPPER CONCENTRATE SHIPPED FROM B.C. TO QUEBEC-MOTION UNDER S.O. 43
Full View Permalink

April 5, 1978

Mr. Ren6 Matte (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Prime Minister. Further to the revelations made by the Cossette-Trudel couple last night on the CBC program Telemag, can the Prime Minister tell the Elouse whether he intends to change his position with regard to the necessity of throwing light on all the details of the gloomy business of the October 1970 crisis? Mr. Speaker, I wonder whether the Prime Minister is turning a deaf ear or whether he wants me to put my question again?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
Full View Permalink

March 14, 1978

Mr. Ren6 Matte (Champlain):

Mr. Speaker, I have a question for the Secretary of State.

Since hockey is considered as our national sport by both Anglophones and Francophones and since all Canadians have the right to be served in their own language by the French and English CBC networks, could the minister tell the House why hockey games are not broadcast in French by the CBC in the Toronto and Vancouver areas?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   OFFICIAL LANGUAGES
Full View Permalink