Donald W. MUNRO

MUNRO, Donald W., B.A., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
Birth Date
April 8, 1916
Deceased Date
July 28, 1998
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_W._Munro
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=d1c4aaea-4f83-4d4a-b04f-0ba13e6c4bc9&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
diplomat

Parliamentary Career

October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Esquimalt--Saanich (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 528)


June 29, 1984

Mr. Donald W. Munro (Esquimalt-Saanich):

Mr. Speaker, earlier this month the 27th Annual Croatian Day celebrations took place in Vancouver. These celebrations mark the long and honourable history of Canadians of Croatian heritage, who number in the tens of thousands. Many Croatians settled on the West Coast more than a century ago and played an important part in the building of British Columbia. Canada owes much to these people, yet the federal Government continues to ignore its obligations to an issue of concern to 80 per cent of the Yugoslavs in Canada who are of Croatian origin.

One major problem results from the lack of adequate Canadian consular services in Yugoslavia. Members of the Canadian Croatian community have long requested that a Canadian Government consular office be established at Zagreb in Croatia, Yugoslavia. This seems only fair, given that the Yugoslav Government maintains three consular offices in Canada, one in Montreal, one in Toronto, and one in Vancouver, as well as an embassy in Ottawa.

Additionally, a Canadian Consulate in Zagreb is a reasonable request when one considers that the only office of our Government in Yugoslavia is in Belgrade, several hundred miles from where Croatians live. Many Croatians must therefore travel a great distance to the Serbian capital of Yugoslavia in order to process passports, visas, and immigration documents, or to consult with the Canadian Government on business matters. Surely if the Yugoslav Government deems it important to operate-

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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June 27, 1984

Mr. Donald W. Munro (Esquimalt-Saanich):

The Minister must know and, if he does not, his colleague will tell him, that the Mobile Arctic Island Drilling Platform is available. It is a Canadian product and a Canadian innovation which employs Canadians.

Oral Questions

We have been urged to buy Canadian. Why is the Minister awarding PIP grants to companies that do not buy Canadian? Why does he not put it into law?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AVAILABILITY OF MOBILE ARCTIC DRILLING PLATFORM
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June 27, 1984

Mr. Donald W. Munro (Esquimalt-Saanich):

Mr. Speaker, my question is directed to the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources. I am sure that he is aware that the funds for PIP grants for exploration in the Arctic are mainly derived from Canadian consumers of petroleum products through the PGRT paid at the gas pumps. He must also be aware that much of the equipment being used in that exploration activity is bought, hired or contracted offshore, as his brochure shows very clearly.

Would the Minister tell us why Canadian generated funds should be used to subsidize offshore drilling equipment and offshore shipbuilding, when there is a Canadian product and Canadian shipbuilding on shore which those Canadian funds could be used to help?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   PETROLEUM INCENTIVES PROGRAM GRANTS FOR EXPLORATION IN ARCTIC
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June 21, 1984

Mr. Donald W. Munro (Esquimalt-Saanich):

Mr. Speaker, the Royal Society of Canada announced not long ago that it wanted to establish a National House of Academics in the vacant building formerly occupied by the Teacher's College, on the corner of Elgin and Lisgar, in Ottawa.

The Royal Society, which was founded by the Government of Canada in 1882, would like to bring under the same roof all our national scientific and cultural institutions and associations, to facilitate the sharing and exchange of ideas and resources. There is no centre of this kind in Canada, unlike other developed countries. The Royal Society feels it is time that Canada, like most of the world's civilized countries, had its own National House of Academics.

Teacher's College, now the property of Public Works Canada, has been empty since 1978. Now that the July 15 deadline for termination of negotiations between Public Works Canada and the City of Ottawa for renting the property is drawing near, I would like to suggest that this House support Dr. Alexander Mackay, President of the Royal Society, in urging the federal Government to assign Teacher's College to the Royal Society, on a rental basis, so that it may become Canada's "National House of Academies".

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CULTURE
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June 21, 1984

Mr. Munro (Esquimalt-Saanich):

Mr. Speaker, I too have a question for the Hon. Member for Bow River (Mr. Taylor). It relates to comments he made about the new Leader of the Liberal Party who is either unaware of what is before us or is condoning what is before us. Could he explain exactly where he believes Mr. Turner stands with respect to this legislation as far as closure is concerned and with respect to the principles involved as well. Is it the Member's belief that Mr. Turner is adhering to these principles and actually condones them?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ACT
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