George Carlyle MARLER

MARLER, The Hon. George Carlyle, P.C., B.C.L.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Saint-Antoine--Westmount (Quebec)
Birth Date
September 14, 1901
Deceased Date
April 10, 1981
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Carlyle_Marler
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=d02f5106-f712-49ea-b952-2006effd9db7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
notary

Parliamentary Career

November 8, 1954 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Saint-Antoine--Westmount (Quebec)
  • Minister of Transport (July 1, 1954 - June 20, 1957)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
LIB
  Saint-Antoine--Westmount (Quebec)
  • Minister of Transport (July 1, 1954 - June 20, 1957)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 433)


January 28, 1958

Mr. Marler:

The minister will have plenty of opportunity to do so when the clock is not moving against him as it is now. I think the house is entitled to something much

Industrial Relations

clearer than the rather inadequate explanations the minister has put on the record already, which are not in conformity with the principles that are involved and certainly do not explain the differences between Ontario, let us say, on Saturday and Ontario on Monday.

In fact, Mr. Chairman, the resolution itself tells us that this could not possibly be the explanation of these differences because we see, coming to the part having to do with the provinces as a whole, that the proposed change is to alter the definition of standard individual income tax so that in any agreement these words shall be construed as if the words "10 per cent" were replaced by the words "13 per cent". That makes it perfectly clear, Mr. Chairman.

Topic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS MEASURE TO PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO ATLANTIC PROVINCES, ETC.
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January 27, 1958

Mr. Marler:

I hope we do not allow any more weekends to go by because they make it quite expensive for these other provinces. Frankly, I think the minister ought to realize, and this is my last word on the subject of the figures, that the figures that were given on Saturday were regarded as being authentic and accurate. I am sure they have gone all across the country, unless I am very much mistaken as to the interest in them on the part of members of the press gallery. I am sure it must be very disappointing for

those who are getting less to find, unfortunately, that reality is not quite as good as Saturday's promise.

Topic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS MEASURE TO PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO ATLANTIC PROVINCES, ETC.
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January 27, 1958

Mr. Marler:

The explanation which the

Minister of Finance has just given may be quite apt for the two provinces of Prince Edward Island and British Columbia but unfortunately it does not change the hard, cold reality of the figures which he gave on Saturday. I do not want to waste too much time on this point, but he did say on Saturday that the additional payment which British Columbia would receive would be $5,563,000, whereas according to the table put on the record this afternoon the increase for British Columbia will be $2,842,000.

However, leaving aside the provinces of Prince Edward Island and British Columbia, as to which the stabilization factor may explain the mistake in the minister's figures, the fact does remain that all the other figures are out, too. There is no question of stabilization there. In other words, Mr. Chairman, I do not know whether this is homemade arithmetic on the part of the Minister of Finance, but perhaps it is like some of my own figures; they do not always work out when I put them under professional scrutiny. There is a difference of a million more for Quebec and approximately a million more for Ontario.

Topic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS MEASURE TO PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO ATLANTIC PROVINCES, ETC.
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January 27, 1958

Mr. Marler:

Mr. Chairman, the first point with which I should like to deal tonight is the question of the figures showing the increases which will be payable to the provinces under the arrangement which is contemplated by this resolution. Since the minister tabled the statement showing the amount to be received by the provinces under the new arrangement I have had an opportunity of comparing those figures with the figures which he gave to the house on Saturday. I am quite surprised to find that in no case do the figures agree. Not only is there a substantial difference in nearly every case, but there are two notable exceptions in the case of Prince Edward Island which according to the table is to receive some $370,000 less-

Topic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS MEASURE TO PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO ATLANTIC PROVINCES, ETC.
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January 27, 1958

Mr. Marler:

This is the Prime Minister speaking, who complained of the shortness of duration of those conferences in past times. He said:

Why these gatherings of a day or two? Why do we not have a meeting of the federal authorities, the provincial authorities and the municipalities?

Yes, Mr. Chairman, the Prime Minister had in mind that the municipalities should be present but now, unfortunately, he has found that there were constitutional difficulties in the way in the year 1957 that did not seem to be present at all in 1956. I continue:

Call it a constitutional convention, if you like, without the power of amendment of the constitution in respect of those fundamental rights which are inherent in the constitution, but why not have a gathering designed to bring about the reconsideration of a problem which for the last 13 years or so has become increasingly complex?

I quote these words, Mr. Chairman, and everybody will realize how apt they are and the extent to which they apply to the conference which was held in November, and the action which the Prime Minister took last

Dominion-Provincial Relations Friday night in informing the provincial governments of the decision taken by the present government. Listen to what the Solicitor General had to say, as reported at page 6028 of Hansard, and this is a translation, Mr. Chairman:

In fact, the resolution moved by the Honourable Minister of Finance (Mr. Harris) and upon which we are called upon to pass judgment, is not the result of a conference between the federal government and the provinces; not at all.

And yet this very resolution, Mr. Chairman, which we are being asked to pass is not the result of a conference between the federal government and the provinces. Let us make no mistake about that. This is a purely unilateral action on the part of gentlemen on the treasury benches. I continue with the quotation from the Solicitor General:

We are not being asked to ratify an agreement between the dominion government and the provinces, an agreement reached following long negotiations where every party concerned had previously examined the proposals made. On the contrary, once again the federal government acted in a centralizing and unilateral way.

How aptly these words of the Solicitor General apply to the actions of the government of which he is one of the members. He continued:

It called the provinces together, read its proposal and asked them what they thought about it, made a few minor changes here and there and said: "Do as you wish; this is as far as we can go," knowing full well that the provinces are not in a position to do without them, even though they found the amounts altogether inadequate.

In this particular case the government did not even call the provinces together to acquaint them of this decision with regard to these additional payments; they advised them merely by telephone. Mr. Chairman, I hope the Solicitor General will reread the words which he used when he was sitting on this side of the house. But one cannot avoid the reflection that there are merely 20 feet of green carpet which seems to separate those benches from which I speak and the treasury benches. By merely crossing that carpet the hon. gentlemen who are Minister of National Revenue, Minister of Trade and Commerce and the Solicitor General have all undergone extraordinary transformations in their thinking. They no longer think the way they did when they were on this side of the house. They have a new formula which is different from what they had in 1956. By merely crossing this 20 feet of green carpet they have suddenly attained a virtue that they did not have in 1956. The Minister of National Revenue laughs. He occasionally used to do that when he was on this side of the house, therefore in that respect he has not changed by moving across these 20 feet of green carpet.

I see it is six o'clock, Mr. Chairman.

At six o'clock the committee took recess.

Topic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS MEASURE TO PROVIDE FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO ATLANTIC PROVINCES, ETC.
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