Arza Clair CASSELMAN

CASSELMAN, Arza Clair, Q.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
Birth Date
January 19, 1891
Deceased Date
May 11, 1958
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arza_Clair_Casselman
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=cdd10c21-6c0d-459f-a8a0-99d3c72da7b1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - December 27, 1921
CON
  Grenville (Ontario)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
  • Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942) (January 1, 1935 - January 1, 1942)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CON
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
  • Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942) (January 1, 1935 - January 1, 1942)
  • Chief Opposition Whip (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
  • Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
  • Whip of the Conservative Party (1867-1942) (January 1, 1935 - January 1, 1942)
  • Chief Opposition Whip (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
  • Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
  • Chief Opposition Whip (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
  • Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
  • Chief Opposition Whip (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
  • Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
  • Chief Opposition Whip (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
  • Whip of the Progressive Conservative Party (January 1, 1936 - January 1, 1955)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)
  • Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole (October 15, 1957 - February 1, 1958)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
PC
  Grenville--Dundas (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 107)


July 28, 1964

Mrs. Casselman:

Mr. Chairman-

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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July 28, 1964

Mrs. Casselman:

Mr. Chairman, I thank the house for that warmth.

I do not wish to take up too much time, in case there are others-and I know there are-who would like to speak. I think it is only fair at the beginning of my remarks to state that I feel the minister and her department deserve more in the way of commendation than criticism for their efforts in one of the most difficult departments of our whole government area. Everyone should be, purely as a matter of common sense, vitally interested in everything to do with health. Health and welfare are almost inextricably inter-related with the well-being of all our citizens and also with the many economic implications of welfare. This department is so large and each branch is so important that we could make good arguments and pleas for improved facili-

ties and increased expenditures tor every single branch. There are also the many additional pressures, such as the emotional pleas for and sympathies aroused by the disabled, pension problems, cancer, research needs and the miseries, tangible and intangible, of mental health problems. The difficulty would seem to be to find an efficient principle by which to tackle these inter-related problems.

It is natural that the picture should be rapidly changing because new discoveries in diagnosis, cures and preventions have been made. The size of the subject, the constant changes, the emotionalism involved and our limited budget combine to make health and welfare an area demanding the most sane, sympathetic and businesslike thinking. It is an area particularly open to the "plug the dike" technique which is unavoidable, due to the emergency quality of many of the needs. It is also open to inequalities due to very easily aroused sympathies. I think particularly of problems like thalidomide and the tragedies involved therein. However there is no way of evaluating human tragedy and it could well be argued by many suffering from other incapacities that their needs for help were just as great.

In order that the cost of solving problems does not continue to increase and increase into infinity, and lie as a heavy burden upon our society, I personally should like to see a stronger and more concerted effort made from every possible preventive angle. I remember seven or eight years ago I had occasion to thank one of the greatest surgeons in Canada, indeed probably one of the greatest in the world, for what seemed to me to be a miracle of surgery. He mentioned that this was a mechanical process which could be learned, and to him his greatest interest in medicine was in the improvement of prevention. He felt the need for a very great increase in research in all directions. These research improvements would, he felt, automatically improve the problems of hospitalization, surgery, and all the other facilities which have grown so rapidly with such great credit to our medical society.

Those who have to do with animals, either in agriculture or as pets, spend a great deal of time studying dietary problems, how to improve their pets' good looks or high spirits, their stamina, speed, weight, etc. Therefore it seems slightly ridiculous that these people spend very little effort, sometimes none at all, on their own eating habits and those of their families. They are also concerned for the exercise of their pets and livestock. By the

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same token a very small percentage of our population gives any thought to its own personal exercise and that of their families, with resultant good health.

I have been greatly interested right from the beginning in the fitness and sports program, and I hope that the government will continue to give increased leadership in this direction. I have urged this before and I will continue to do so. It seems to me to be an endlessly hopeful avenue along which we can travel toward better physical health, which will also improve automatically our mental health and the proper use of increasing leisure time which has been derived from automation.

We heard today from the hon. member for Saskatoon one of the best maiden speeches ever made in this house. It was knowledgeable and helpful, and as the hon. member for Northwest Territories said in following, it could well be used as a good example for all members of parliament. It occurred to me as I listened to the facts of and the need for mental health that a heavy responsibility of leadership lies on all of us who are in a position to see the weaknesses in our society. The hon. member for Saskatoon mentioned that for years the tragedy of this particular kind of illness was hidden and neglected. She quite aptly mentioned segregation, which we all have sad reason to recognize as a negative approach to the solution of any problem.

Although we have made great strides in recognizing new techniques, the usefulness of treatment and the extent of mental illness, there is still a long way to go. We must come to grips with the facts, disturbing and frightening as they are, of the numbers of people suffering from this type of illness. I agree with this and heartily urge that the recommendations of the hon. member for Saskatoon be given sympathetic consideration. It seems to me that the area of preventive approaches is preperly recognized in her suggestion of increasing the number of public health and social workers to help people at a time when they need help. We all see cases where people could be helped in the beginning stages of physical or mental illness and so very often the disease goes on to the fatal stage. We have become educated to check-ups for tuberculosis, cancer, blood, etc., and we can and should become educated to positive, complete good health and the routine needed to maintain this throughout a lifetime.

It seems a great pity if only young people are carefully nurtured. Now there is general, careful feeding of infants, extra vitamins and proper fresh air. Attention to

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health continues in many families through the teens. However there is a gradual falling off of health care when people assume the responsibilities of a home and a job, just at the very time when positive good health is so seriously needed.

Before tragedy cut short the so productive life of the late President Kennedy, we had one of the greatest examples of leadership, of someone showing how to learn to live with a physical problem. At long last we saw the leaders of a democratic nation making glowing good health fashionable.

It seems to me we are not quite clear in our definition of a standard of living. It may be a high standard of accumulation to have a large bank account, a lot of property and a lot of gadgets, but surely a high standard of living actually means to live in a healthy, vibrant participating way. Much time and energy has gone into the study of the health of Canadians. The Hall commission among other preventive recommendations places a carefully planned dental program for children high on the list of priorities. The shortage of dental personnel is pointed out and how all possible means must be followed to overcome this weakness in our general health facilities. It is well known how general health deteriorates from lack of proper dental care.

The royal commission on health services specifically recommends that the solution is fluoridation, a recognized preventive of tooth decay. This technique has now been studied for over 30 years and from the best of scientific observation it must be recognized that savings in health and the cost of tooth care can be made by this means. Surely it is not sensible to ignore a scientific discovery so heavily recommended for the good of our society. I urge the government to give the needed leadership.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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November 14, 1963

Mrs. Casselman:

Mr. Chairman, may I begin by mentioning that the former minister of health and welfare, the hon. member for Perth, is unavoidably absent at this moment owing to a previous commitment; hence my beginning the debate on behalf of our party. However, he will be here within the hour.

May I at the outset express my personal good wishes on the floor of this house, although I have expressed them privately to the minister, for her very good health during her tenure of office. I will not elaborate on that, but I do wish her well and hope she has much personal satisfaction and a sense of achievement from her very heavy schedule. There is a general desire among the members of our party to facilitate the passing of estimates generally, particularly these estimates tonight. Therefore, I will endeavour to express only a broad interest in all aspects of the department's efforts, and also to avoid the very obvious controversial aspects of some of the problems facing us in the future. I will endeavour to keep my comments on the estimates for the year 1963-64 to a minimum and as concise as possible.

We in this country happily enjoy the second highest standard of living in the world, which brings with it peculiar and particular

Supply-Health and Welfare problems, problems peculiar to a country adjoining another country with ten times the population. The question is asked on all sides how our services are paid for. This places a very heavy responsibility of leadership upon any government, a very heavy responsibility on Canadian citizens in their requests and desire for services. The Minister of Finance has warned us that unless the national budget is moved toward balance Canada will find itself on the rocks. This is a comment which is well made, but it is easier made in opposition than in government. I wish to express my great sympathy for the Minister of Finance, considering the staggering job he has to do. Businessmen are constantly criticizing government, and I presume they will continue to do so for incurring expenditure which, they fear, will cripple the economy. We must pay regard to such criticism, if we are to maintain the respect of businessmen, who, after all, must face the problems of heavy world competition, and if we are to maintain the respect of the Canadian citizens whose money we are spending.

We must keep uppermost in our minds means by which measures necessary for our national health and welfare can be taken simply and economically. Such an approach has been adopted by many people over the years, particularly by the able staff of the department of health and welfare. When I was connected with the department I noticed how generously and unselfishly the staff worked to meet sudden and unexpected demands on their time and energies. I think it is up to members of this house to meet the social problems which confront us in the same spirit, when it comes to the working out of social policies. We know that the attention we give to health and welfare problems affects our daily lives and personal happiness to a large extent, since it is closely connected with social order and social harmony in our country. I am sure that no one inside or outside this house has any quarrel with the theory of hospital insurance. It is needed, useful and right. But the justice of its administration is something which must be watched carefully and constantly. According to the estimates of 1959-60 the cost of hospital insurance was about $150 million. This year's estimates show the cost to be $285 million, an increase over last year as the hon. lady has stated, of more than $60 million. We realize that to some extent the increase was inevitable due to an increase in the number of hospitals and in the number of people using and staffing the hospitals. In 1958 we almost doubled the amount of federal assistance given to hospital building, alterations and renovations. No one could quarrel with this step, having regard to the improvement in the health of Canadians

and in our society generally which has resulted; but from my own observations and from comments made by doctors it seems to me there is an area of outpatient assistance where the service might have been strengthened. One hears of many cases where patients, particularly chronic and elderly patients, go to hospital because their families for one reason or another cannot afford to keep them at home, though they would wish to do so if it were possible. It may be that a relatively slight increase in expenditure on public health nurses who could visit such cases would be helpful in meeting the needs of patients of this kind.

Undoubtedly, many ideas could be obtained as a result of concentrated efforts, working in co-operation with hospital boards, doctors and all groups interested in the care of the sick. I urge the minister to encourage a continuance of grants by which assistance is given to research into social problems, and to the training of essential workers in this field. It seems to me it would be penny wise and pound foolish to go on indefinitely increasing the already high cost of the care of the sick if we did not pay equal attention to research into cure of disease. Not only should we pay the closest attention to research in our own country but we should improve our communications with other countries and with organizations such as the World Health Organization, so as to be able to take the best advantage of all the work which is being done outside Canada in this field. I feel that in an age of greatly increased research this is one way in which we may be able to reap benefits and eventually avoid the skyrocketing costs of illnesses which we do not yet know how to cure. Along the same lines, I would urge the minister to continue to pay attention to the fitness and amateur sports program, in which I am personally much interested and which, I believe, has a direct relationship with what I have just said about the necessity of research into illnesses and diseases. Both lead towards the goal we should all like to see attained. Both constitute a definite and positive approach to health problems in Canada.

In an effort to avoid repetition I have tried not to deal with particular aspects of the work of the department which will be considered intelligently and constructively by other members of this party.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE
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December 19, 1962

Mrs. Casselman:

1. No. The British Columbia government has at no time sought to take greater advantage of the federal act so as to provide insurance benefits to residents temporarily absent from the province for a period in excess of three months. The hardships imposed on residents of British Columbia through this restriction have been brought to the attention of the British Columbia authorities on a number of occasions.

2. Yes. Unless the British Columbia resident enters the hospital during the first three months of temporary absence, he loses his entitlement and is himself responsible for the payment of hospital services.

3. Although there is a varied pattern of out of province benefits from province to province, all provinces with the exception of British Columbia provide insured services for

Orders jor Returns

residents temporarily absent from the province during a period of one year, subject to the payment of the premium or tax in premium provinces.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS INFORMATION CENTRE IN CANADA
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December 19, 1962

Mrs. Casselman:

1. (a) $397,435 has been spent on the recommendation of the national advisory council on fitness and amateur sport. In addition, grants totalling $214,785 have been made to the provinces, (b) No.

2. The provinces are not represented as such on the national advisory council on

fitness and amateur sport. Members serve as private individuals, though residents of each province are included on the council.

All provinces except Quebec have now signed a federal-provincial agreement under the Fitness and Amateur Sport Act.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COUNCIL ON FITNESS AND AMATEUR SPORT
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