Henry Joseph MURPHY

MURPHY, Henry Joseph, B.C.L.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Westmorland (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
February 9, 1921
Deceased Date
November 26, 2006
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Murphy_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=cc21455f-f721-48f4-a34f-550dd9ef3822&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Westmorland (New Brunswick)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
LIB
  Westmorland (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 6 of 39)


December 4, 1957

Mr. H. J. Murphy (Westmorland):

I should like to direct a question to the Prime Minister. Will the Prime Minister reconsider the business of the house to allow for legislation to increase the pensions of former government railway employees, which he himself has termed totally inadequate?

Topic:   PENSIONS
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR INCREASES FOR FORMER GOVERNMENT RAILWAY EMPLOYEES
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December 4, 1957

Mr. Murphy (Westmorland):

No, but if you

wish to check the accuracy of that statement I suggest that you get in touch with the hon. member for Oxford, who was on the stage at that time.

There is another project that would assist in relieving the unemployment situation in our district. I refer to the elimination of grade crossings in the city of Moncton. I will not say it is the fault of the railway that the rails go through the centre of town. The rails were put there some time ago when Moncton was a very small place called The Bend, and the town has grown around the railway line. I understand there are plans now for the lowering of the railway tracks so that overhead passage for other vehicles can be built with greater ease. If this were done the trade and commerce section of Moncton would not be cut in two by the railway line, and the crossings would no longer be a menace to the lives of the people in the area.

Another suggestion has been made that the tracks be diverted, and that rather than go through the city they should pass through the west end so there would be no interference with the main streets of the city of Moncton.

I think either of these programs would be acceptable to the people of that area. I know a great amount of work would be created for the unemployed. This is the type of work that has a high labour content and requires a lot of men. I believe such a project would be of great assistance now.

Early this morning we received in our mail a newspaper supplement from Saint John,

Interim Supply

New Brunswick, about the Chignecto canal. It hon. members read it they will find what the Chignecto canal is. Briefly, it is a canal to be built on the border between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia to allow vessels to pass from Northumberland strait to the bay ot Fundy. A ship going from Montreal to Boston would save approximately 400 miles. The canal would also be a water lane from Prince Edward Island and the north shore of Nova Scotia to the industrial cities of New England.

The Prime Minister has said, and I agree with him, that this is part and parcel of the St. Lawrence seaway. I would ask hon. members to look at the newspaper supplement on the Chignecto canal. I do not wish to be inaccurate in what I say about it. In that paper hon. members will find a statement by the hon. member for Saint John-Albert. They can read exactly what he has to say, and they will see from what he says how strongly he is behind the project.

This project is one that was held out as an inducement to the maritime provinces to enter confederation. Hon. members will find that after confederation, when the parliament of Canada met, members and senators from the maritime provinces brought up the matter. One senator, Amos E. Botsford of New Brunswick, said the Chignecto canal had been held out by the conference at Quebec as an inducement to New Brunswick to enter confederation. Senator Dickey declared that at the conference it was distinctly understood that the canal should be constructed. John Burpee, then member of parliament for Sun-bury, now York-Sunbury, declared that if the people of New Brunswick had not been satisfied that the canal would be built they never would have consented to the union.

In the newspaper supplement it will be found that many others who were at the conference brought the matter to the attention of the house. The 100th anniversay of confederation will be about 10 years from now, and even if the promise is 100 years old it would be nice to see it fulfilled by that time. This project has twice been in the estimates of the House of Commons.

Having dealt with capital projects, I turn again to the question of the pensioners of the government railway who live in Moncton. I wish to say that I disagree thoroughly with the Prime Minister when he says that this is not an important matter.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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December 4, 1957

Mr. Murphy (Westmorland):

I asked him a question concerning legislation to assist these people, and he said this matter was of little or no importance.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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December 4, 1957

Mr. Murphy (Westmorland):

Mr. Chairman, I was shocked this morning at the reference the Prime Minister made to the pensioned employees of the government railways in this country. This problem is one which I have brought to the attention of the house on other occasions. In Westmorland county there are thousands of pensioned employees of the Intercolonial Railway. Of course this railway has been out of existence for some time, since it was taken over by the Canadian National. This group is small, and in a few years the problem will solve itself because there will be no pensioners living.

When I was on the other side of the house I brought this matter to the attention of the government, as a reference to Hansard will indicate. Of course the Prime Minister may not have had time to read the speeches I made when I was on the government side of the house.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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December 4, 1957

Mr. Murphy (Westmorland):

The hon.

member has said that I have taken them up piecemeal. I have brought them to the attention of the house whenever it was possible, and I would remind him that the Atlantic resolutions were not signed by me. They were signed by the 33 Conservative candidates in the Atlantic provinces. It is the duty of those members to bring these resolutions to the attention of this house. As I stated on another occasion, there is one Conservative member in this house who has had the courage to put some of them on the order paper by way of resolution. I believe there are three contained in a resolution standing in the name of the hon. member for Pictou.

Referring once again to the Prince Edward Island causeway, I may say that Prince Edward Island is one of the beauty spots of Canada. It is also one of the finest farming sections of the country. This causeway would be of great benefit to the people of Prince Edward Island in the movement of their products to the mainland. It would assist also in the development of industries on Prince Edward Island, because much of the transportation is done by truck.

We have within Westmorland county many stone quarries. In fact quite a number of the public buildings in Boston were built from stone quarried in Westmorland county.

I feel that these quarries could be reactivated and the stone used for the construction of an island causeway. I am not an engineer, but I have talked to some who are familiar with the shore line of Westmorland county and Prince Edward Island. They tell me that if this causeway were built it would soon be protected by sand dunes. We know this to be true, because one of the problems connected with wharves and breakwaters in the Northumberland strait area is that the drifting sands of Northumberland strait soon tend to gather around the breakwaters and the first thing we know we have a breakwater that appears to be on dry land. A great amount of dredging is necessary. I think this same condition would prevail if the island causeway were built.

We know the Prime Minister has taken a great interest in Prince Edward Island. In Charlottetown on April 29, as reported in the Ottawa Journal, the Prime Minister said when speaking of the money owed the federal government by Prince Edward Island:

Prince Edward Island will realize what $1,400,000 is. That amount will imprison this province. It will intensify financial difficulties. It will render a mockery of the concept of united Canada.

Farther on he said:

Prince Edward Island will become the poorest of the poor relations in Canada, unless you take action now.

The people of Prince Edward Island believed in the sincerity of the Prime Minister and sent four Conservative members, the entire number of members allotted to Prince Edward Island, to this parliament.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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