Maurice BRASSET

BRASSET, Maurice, Q.C., B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Gaspé (Quebec)
Birth Date
April 12, 1884
Deceased Date
April 5, 1971
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Brasset
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ca0503f8-6363-41e2-9b5b-12c115d3c8c8&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Gaspé (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 36 of 37)


April 21, 1931

Mr. BRASSET:

I was paired with the hon. member for St. Ann (Mr. Sullivan). Had I voted I would have voted against the motion.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 19, 1931

Mr. BRASSET (Translation):

Yes, unfortunately they are climbing and rapidly.

Under the Conservatives, expenditures exceed the revenues; under the Liberals we had surpluses.

Under the Conservatives, the national debt is increasing; under the Liberals, it was decreasing.

Under the Conservatives, the revenues of the country are decreasing; under the Liberals, they were on the increase.

These are the Conservative balance-sheets and the balance-sheets of the Liberal administration. The Conservatives proclaim everywhere that the Prime Minister has redeemed his pledges. The people of Canada

would be easily pleased if they were satisfied with the deeds of this government.

Mr. Speaker, the unemployment question has been broached, it is very much in evidence, and what I would have to say -would not alter the situation. However, in listening to the speakers who preceded me these last days, I thought that the government's endeavours to relieve unemployment did not produce the result which the Conservative themselves expected. The then leader of the opposition, the Prime Minister of to-day, had solemnly pledged his word-that everybody heard, members on the right as well as those on the left-not to try to merely relieve unemployment, but to completely eradicate it. What result has the Prime Minister had since his advent to power. Is there less unemployment? Has unemployment ceased? I shall state that not only it has not ceased, but that it has spread more than ever. The calls for help which reach members from all parts of Canada are a sufficient answer.

It is often queried, sir, how the government would fare should elections take place now. We wonder what would be the verdict of the people if after eight months in power our friends on your right, sir, were to face another general election. The almost unanimous views expressed by the people of Canada, is that were we to have elections today the Conservative party would be swept from power. What the Canadian people expected, so as to relieve unemployment, is not a few million dollars given out as charity. The Canadian people have more pride than that. It is not charity we expected, we had hoped, on the present Prime Minister assuming power, that a constructive policy would give works to the people; and not doles. And this charity of $20,000,000 how was it given? It was given with the disdainful gesture of the wealthy man who drops a few cents to the beggar on the street in order to get rid of him. Poor municipalities were forced to bleed themselves white in order to contribute their share and thus assure a few days of work to the unemployed. What happened in my own riding? The unemployed worked eight, ten, fifteen days, and now they are poorer than ever.

It unfortunately happened, in my county, that many poor parishes and municipalities were forced to borrow in order to meet the requirements of the government and thereby help the latter to relieve the distress existing. These municipalities were already relieving much distress and in no way did they need to be forced by the government to help their poor, which they had begun to do long before the government had their measure of $20,000,000 voted.

The Address-Mr. Brasset

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 19, 1931

Mr. MAURICE BRASSET (Gaspe):

My first words will be to extend my regards to the Speaker of this house. At the special session in September last as well as, so far, during this session, it has been my impression that the Speaker has given a fair deal to both sides of the house. So far as I am concerned, and I think I can speak for most of my colleagues on this side, I can say that you, Mr. Speaker, may expect from us the most cordial cooperation. And now, sir, my constituency being composed, in large majority, of French-speaking people, and even though a great proportion of the members of this house are not familiar with the French language, I shall continue my remarks in my mother tongue. -

(Translation): Mr. Speaker, my first wish is

to congratulate the mover and seconder of the address. They delivered their speeches with much zest, and it is all to their credit. I state that it was all to their credit because it was a difficult task to vindicate the acts of the present government. I could add, sir, that this government, although it has been in power for eight months only, has to its record the harnessing of the country with one of the most unpopular administrations in existence since confederation. In the course of the last election, through public addresses, the radio and every possible Conservative medium of propaganda, we heard sung the praises and exploits of the then leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett).

The Address-Mr. Brasset

From one end of the country to the other pledges abound: the ceasing of unemployment, the lowering of the cost of living, work for everybody, high wages, etc., etc. Briefly, it was the golden age returning to earth, and we were told: Elect Mr. Bennett; elect the leader of the Conservative opposition and you will have in this country all that you desire. Everybody will have work, and factories will open their doors again. Well, for eight months the Canadian people have been waiting and what is the result? The people have been waiting eight months without hearing the roar of the guns, without any blasting of foreign markets. The people have waited eight months without seeing the promised millennium; instead what is happening? Let us examinu the balance sheet of the Conservative party since they are in power and compare it with that of the Liberal regime. I quote from an extract of L'Avenir du Nord:

Under the Conseratives, the unemployment crisis which they were to relieve immediately on assuming power, is more acute than under the Liberal regime.

Under the Conservative rule that national unity, that harmony between all the provinces brought about by the Liberals, threaten to he inevitably torn asunder.

And if we had many speeches like the one delivered yesterday, in the house, by the member for Regina, I would have to unfortunately admit that the harmony between the various provinces would not last long.

Under the Conservatives, Canada's trade is collapsing, under the Liberals it had reached the highest summit of our history.

Canada lost the fifth rank among the exporting countries, to make way for India. Dominion Bureau of Sstatistics.

Under the Conservatives, the cost of living increases, under the Liberals, it was decreasing.

Under the Conservatives, the taxes increase; under the Liberals they were decreasing.

An hon. MEMBER (Translation): They are rapidly climbing.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 19, 1931

Mr. BRASSET (Translation):

It is a newspaper that tells the truth.

-they will ask why our export trade shows a deficit on all British markets where, previous to July 28 last, we regularly had a favourable

balance.

They will ask why, after having gained rural ridings by promising to increase the price of butter by cutting out the New Zealand imports, they only succeeded in lowering these prices by 2 cents below the prices of 1929;

They will ask why, in the midst of the crisis, while thousands of Canadians are unemployed, they disorganized the import trade of automobiles and threw on the street about 10,000 workers.

They will be made to answer for all their pledges and all their blunders. The people abide their hour and that hour will come.

Mr. H. A. MULLINS (Marquette); Mr. Speaker, before I take up the subjects I intend to discuss to-night, allow me to extend to you my congratulations upon your appointment. I wish also to extend my congratulations to the mover (Mr. Cormier) and the seconder (Mr. Porteous) of the address in reply to the speech from the throne.

It is some years since I was last in this chamber and there have been many changes in the personnel, but I see a few of the old faces here and that gives me delight and encouragement.

I have listened to the attacks by hon. gentlemen opposite upon my hon. leader, and f confess that while they were being made I found it very hard to keep my seat. I would not be speaking this evening if it were not for the statements made from the other side of the house that this is a onenman government.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 19, 1931

Mr. BRASSET (Translation):

You will have your turn later.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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