James MOORE

MOORE, The Hon. James, P.C., B.A., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
Birth Date
June 10, 1976
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Moore_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c7660459-7e05-4540-b825-ce3958285806&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
broadcaster

Parliamentary Career

November 27, 2000 - December 22, 2003
CA
  Port Moody--Coquitlam--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
December 23, 2003 - May 23, 2004
CPC
  Port Moody--Coquitlam--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services (February 7, 2006 - April 9, 2006)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics (April 10, 2006 - June 24, 2008)
  • Secretary of State (Asia-Pacific Gateway) (2010 Olympics) (Official Languages) (June 25, 2008 - October 29, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Secretary of State (Asia-Pacific Gateway) (2010 Olympics) (Official Languages) (June 25, 2008 - October 29, 2008)
  • Minister of Canadian Heritage (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister for Official Languages (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Minister of Canadian Heritage (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister for Official Languages (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development (February 15, 2013 - February 21, 2013)
  • Minister of Industry (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
May 2, 2011 -
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Minister of Canadian Heritage (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister for Official Languages (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development (February 15, 2013 - February 21, 2013)
  • Minister of Industry (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 451 of 452)


February 16, 2001

Mr. James Moore (Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, economics is one thing and human rights is another.

Mr. Lee is the leader of the democratic party, one of the most important in Hong Kong. He is internationally known as a staunch defender and advocate of democratic rights and is a past winner of the democracy award of the U.S. national endowment for democracy.

How could the Prime Minister overlook such an important democratic ally? What message does this snub send to friends of democracy and human rights in China?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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February 16, 2001

Mr. James Moore (Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, the foreign affairs minister said that human rights is intrinsically linked with trade. While that is true, since 1994 and the first team Canada trade mission to China, our trade deficit with China has increased over 300% and human rights abuses in China have become worse, with persecution against the Falun Gong.

He is bragging about this team Canada trade mission to China, but what he is failing to tell the House is that corporate welfare agreements to build the Three Gorges dam is not an avenue to better human rights treatment of the people of China.

Could the foreign affairs minister explain how he will improve human rights abuses in China and ensure that the people there have a better future?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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February 12, 2001

Mr. James Moore (Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has dropped his commitment to justice.

Prior to the team Canada trip news stories were filled with reports of his commitment to human rights in China. Now that he is on the ground there he seems to have changed his tune by saying that Canada is too small of a fry to stand up for what is right.

Canada has endangered species legislation that mandates fines of up to $25,000 or six months in jail for people who knowingly import products from endangered species, so we ban the importation of ivory to protect endangered African elephants. Why is the government prepared to give more protection to African elephants than to Chinese prisoners of conscience?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Human Rights
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February 12, 2001

Mr. James Moore (Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, I guess the answer is hurry up and wait. In 1999 Canada imported a staggering $8.9 billion worth of products from China. There are reports everywhere from groups such as Amnesty International that some of those products are made by prisoners of conscience in labour camps.

Since 1930 the United States has had a law specifically prohibiting the importation of goods made by prisoners or forced labour. In the mid-1990s the American state department began working aggressively to ensure that goods made by Chinese prison labour were not imported into the United States.

When could Canadians expect a similarly tough attitude in defence of human rights in China?

Topic:   Oral Question Period
Subtopic:   Human Rights
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February 9, 2001

Mr. James Moore (Port Moody—Coquitlam—Port Coquitlam, Canadian Alliance)

Mr. Speaker, today the Prime Minister visits China, in part to promote democracy in that country. On Tuesday, B.C. Senator Ray Perrault retired, giving the Prime Minister a golden opportunity to practise democracy at home.

A replacement senator could easily be elected through B.C.'s senatorial selection act, which encourages the election of senators. This senate vote could be held in conjunction with B.C.'s upcoming provincial election, which must be held by the end of May.

To prove his commitment to democracy, the Prime Minister needs only to tell British Columbians that he will appoint the senator they elect. Respecting democracy at home will clearly make him more worthy to talk about democracy abroad.

With the mechanism in place and an electoral window on the horizon, there seems to be no reason why B.C.'s next senator cannot be elected.

Surely democracy in Canada should come before democracy in China. I hope the Prime Minister takes this chance to show that he agrees.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   The Senate
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