James MOORE

MOORE, The Hon. James, P.C., B.A., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative
Constituency
Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
Birth Date
June 10, 1976
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Moore_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c7660459-7e05-4540-b825-ce3958285806&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
broadcaster

Parliamentary Career

November 27, 2000 - December 22, 2003
CA
  Port Moody--Coquitlam--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
December 23, 2003 - May 23, 2004
CPC
  Port Moody--Coquitlam--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services (February 7, 2006 - April 9, 2006)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Works and Government Services and for the Pacific Gateway and the Vancouver-Whistler Olympics (April 10, 2006 - June 24, 2008)
  • Secretary of State (Asia-Pacific Gateway) (2010 Olympics) (Official Languages) (June 25, 2008 - October 29, 2008)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Secretary of State (Asia-Pacific Gateway) (2010 Olympics) (Official Languages) (June 25, 2008 - October 29, 2008)
  • Minister of Canadian Heritage (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister for Official Languages (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Minister of Canadian Heritage (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister for Official Languages (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development (February 15, 2013 - February 21, 2013)
  • Minister of Industry (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)
May 2, 2011 -
CPC
  Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam (British Columbia)
  • Minister of Canadian Heritage (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister for Official Languages (October 30, 2008 - July 14, 2013)
  • Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development (February 15, 2013 - February 21, 2013)
  • Minister of Industry (July 15, 2013 - November 3, 2015)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 452)


May 28, 2015

Hon. James Moore (Minister of Industry, CPC)

Mr. Speaker, this is not the urgent matter that my colleague is making it out to be. We think it is very important to pass this bill, and as my colleague knows, the House will stop sitting in about three weeks.

We have already had a debate on this very complex bill. In my opinion, we have been very respectful of the members of the House of Commons and the opposition parties. We involved stakeholders from outside the House of Commons.

The Privacy Commissioner is on board with this. Mr. Therrien supports this bill and commends the government's approach in this bill.

It is truly essential that we move forward with this commitment and this approach for the sake of Canadians' privacy, in a world that is more digital than ever. We want this bill to become a reality for the sake of Canadians.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Digital Privacy Act
Full View Permalink

May 28, 2015

Hon. James Moore

Mr. Speaker, I completely disagree. That is what we did with Bill S-4. We had a very respectful and serious debate. We spoke about this bill in depth and talked about the implications of a bill as complex as this one.

In the debate in the House and in committee, and outside the House of Commons, we have had respectful exchanges with the government's partners that are affected by this bill, such as lawyers, representatives of the private sector and the Privacy Commissioner. We carried out analyses, we took part in debate, and presentations were made to the government. We made decisions after truly listening to the people who had concerns about the status quo.

We listened to them and that is why the chamber of commerce, former privacy commissioner Chantal Bernier and Daniel Therrien support this bill. I have a long list of people who support the bill. A large group of Canadians pointed out that our government listened. We did our analyses, we did our homework and we came up with a balanced bill that not only meets the interests of our commercial and electronic future and Canadians' needs, but also meets the government's need to have a really effective bill on Canadians' privacy.

That is what we did. There was debate here, in the House, at committees and outside the House of Commons, before we introduced the bill and while it was before the House. We continue to follow an approach that is democratic and effective, as part of a process that truly achieves results.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Digital Privacy Act
Full View Permalink

May 28, 2015

Hon. James Moore

Mr. Speaker, from 2006, when we first formed government with our first piece of legislation, Bill C-2, and a number of measures since then, we have provided more tools, larger budgets and more responsibilities to independent officers of Parliament in order to hold not only Parliament but also agencies and firms beyond government accountable for their responsibilities and duties to protect Canadians.

This legislation would give the Privacy Commissioner and individual Canadians increased time of up to one year to take an organization to court if it broke the law, instead of the current 45 days. Very often data breaches happen and people may not be informed or may not be fully aware of the consequences that have happened with respect to data breaches and violations of their privacy online.

Currently, there is only a 45-day window when an individual Canadian can take an institution or a firm to court in order to get remedy with respect to the data breach that has taken place. We opened that from 45 days to one year, including empowering the Privacy Commissioner to take action on behalf of Canadians on an individual case or on a broader, more complex file. This is very important.

We want to ensure that the Privacy Commissioner has this kind of power and kind of latitude to take action because 45 days is far too narrow a window. These are the kinds of powers that the Privacy Commissioner asked for, we listened and we have included them in this legislation. This would go a very long way to providing Canadians with greater certainty in a digital world.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Digital Privacy Act
Full View Permalink

May 28, 2015

Hon. James Moore

Mr. Speaker, as the Speaker and a member of the House of Commons, you are well aware that this is always a very important discussion to have at the beginning of each Parliament.

In the future, it will be very important for every one of us to discuss the serious nature of our work in the House of Commons and the way that we are all going to participate in debate that is respectful to our constituents. We need to have that conversation not just here in the House, as an institution, but also within our political parties.

That discussion will be even more important when the number of seats in the House of Commons goes from 308 to 338 this fall. This is always a topic of discussion within the parties, particularly with regard to the House of Commons.

In my opinion, our government is very serious about meeting the needs of Canadian taxpayers and having effective and respectful debates about the content of our bills. That is what we have done with Bill S-4.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Digital Privacy Act
Full View Permalink

May 28, 2015

Hon. James Moore

Mr. Speaker, with respect to my colleague, quite frankly, I do not agree.

With respect to the Privacy Commissioner, I consulted with the interim privacy commissioner at the time, Chantal Bernier, before we tabled the legislation and I also had time to speak with Daniel Therrien. I had a good, long substantive meeting, one on one, with both of these commissioners, as did my officials and my staff, before we tabled the legislation. We did listen, and we did consult prior to tabling the legislation.

With a piece of legislation such as this, as complicated and far reaching as this, we do not arrive at the legislation on our own, sitting in the dark, working away, and trying to guess at what the best balance would be. We consult broadly. We consulted with the Privacy Commissioner before we tabled this legislation, and we have arrived at what is an appropriate balance, in my view, which is why the Privacy Commissioner said about the legislation:

...I am greatly encouraged by the government’s show of commitment to updating...[this legislation] and I welcome many of the amendments proposed in this Bill. Proposals such as breach notification, voluntary compliance agreements and enhanced consent would go a long way to strengthening the framework that protects the privacy of Canadians...

This legislation is supported by the Privacy Commissioner because we were respectful of the process, because we consulted before we tabled the legislation, and we were able to go forward. Equally, I know that the NDP critic on this matter, the member for Terrebonne—Blainville, when we tabled this legislation, said, “We have been pushing for these measures and I'm happy to see them introduced”.

We were very pleased to see the NDP support this bill when we first tabled it, and I hope that the NDP will vote in favour of its sentiment when we began this process over a year ago.

Topic:   Government Orders
Subtopic:   Digital Privacy Act
Full View Permalink