Raymonde FOLCO

FOLCO, Raymonde, B.A., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Laval--Les Îles (Quebec)
Birth Date
March 16, 1940
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymonde_Folco
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c74a4ed9-24d5-4e19-b654-4d20b89be2f6&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
administrator, businesswoman, educational development advisor, manager, senior public servant, teacher

Parliamentary Career

June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Laval West (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources Development (September 1, 2000 - January 12, 2003)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Laval West (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Human Resources Development (September 1, 2000 - January 12, 2003)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Laval--Les Îles (Quebec)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  Laval--Les Îles (Quebec)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
LIB
  Laval--Les Îles (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 156)


February 9, 2011

Ms. Raymonde Folco (Laval—Les Îles, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, during question period, when I asked the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development my second question, a number of my colleagues on this side heard the following:

“Does that member have an earpiece that actually works?”

I find sarcasm to be extremely inappropriate, and it pains me greatly to see a female colleague in the House make this type of comment to another woman, especially when the issue of social housing is so very important. I am asking the minister for an apology.

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   POINTS OF ORDER
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February 4, 2011

Ms. Raymonde Folco (Laval—Les Îles, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development made an unsavoury remark in the House. She said, “It is the Liberals who wanted to ensure that parents were forced to have other people raise their children”.

Her disdainful remark implies that the 70% of women who send their children to day care are unfit mothers. Do the Conservatives have the nerve to repeat that insult to Canadian families?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Child Care
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February 4, 2011

Ms. Raymonde Folco (Laval—Les Îles, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, she may believe that, but Canadians do not follow that logic. The cat is out of the bag. The minister has confirmed what we have always known. She said:

[I]t is the Liberals who wanted to ensure that parents were forced to have other people raise their children. We do not believe in that.

Is that what the Conservatives are telling the millions of Canadian mothers who are relying on child care outside the home, that they are bad mothers?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Child Care
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January 31, 2011

Ms. Raymonde Folco

Mr. Speaker, as I listened to the response by the parliamentary secretary, I can understand why Canadians are very reluctant to give the Conservative government a majority.

Dissent is definitely not something the government tolerates. The government is prepared to risk the accurate collection of data for ideology.

What will the government lose? It will lose the accurate collection of data on our country's health, housing needs, educational needs, seniors' needs, the workforce, new arrivals and, overall, the need for federal programs. I see that the hon. member has not responded to any of those arguments.

On behalf of the people of Canada, researchers, community organizations and aboriginal peoples, we ask the government to stop this haphazard approach to policy development and reinstate the long form census.

Let us explore ways to meet the concerns of the reluctant few.

For every one million Canadians, one complaint was received by the government. How statistically significant is that number?

Topic:   Adjournment Proceedings
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January 31, 2011

Ms. Raymonde Folco

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

With no consultation, the [Conservative] government has undermined evidence-based decision-making in Canada. For a government that made accountability a key priority, this policy choice is perplexing.

In 2006, this country had more than 32 million inhabitants, but it took just one complaint from Richmond Hill and an additional 25 or 30 complaints from elsewhere in Canada for this government to destroy a crucial element of public policy development in Canada. As a result, a radical policy change was made.

What is not clear is, other than Richmond Hill, did all the other complaints come from one town, one province or across the country? Were they all from Conservative-held ridings in Ontario? I am not aware of any person in my riding of Laval—Les Îles complaining and yet the government took such a drastic decision.

The Conservative government has now said that it will spend some $30 million more than what is now being spent for a lower quality, voluntary national household survey. The data will be based on a response rate of a bout 50%. This is a far cry from the previous rate of 94% on the long form.

Witnesses who have appeared before the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities have all sent the same message. I am talking about academics, community based researchers, social policy agencies and private companies. Their message was to leave the long form census alone and that abolishing it would hinder the accurate collection of demographic data on which Canada's public policy is based.

How does the government intend to set departmental plans and priorities with data from a voluntary household survey that will be sent to only 30% of households? Response rates could be 1%, 2% or even less since replies would be voluntary. Will this be sufficient information on which to base future policy?

The Minister of Industry must explain to Canadians how his government intends to evaluate such data over time. People who work in this field have indicated that this new method will not be an acceptable research tool.

A motion passed unanimously by the Northwest Territories Legislative Assembly October 29, 2010 also called for the long form's reinstatement. Aboriginal groups and people on fixed incomes have told us that without the mandatory aspect of this process, the form will rarely be filled out.

Surely in a pluralistic and democratic society it is important to listen to the voice of those who have spoken out against the government's decision to scrap the long form.

Will the government now do the right thing and scrap the voluntary household survey and reinstate the long form census?

Topic:   Adjournment Proceedings
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