Henry Elvins SPENCER

SPENCER, Henry Elvins

Personal Data

Party
United Farmers of Alberta
Constituency
Battle River (Alberta)
Birth Date
March 7, 1882
Deceased Date
October 1, 1972
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Elvins_Spencer
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c59fd096-6883-4701-81c3-6f45cd624771&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, printer, publisher

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Battle River (Alberta)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
PRO
  Battle River (Alberta)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
UFA
  Battle River (Alberta)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
UFA
  Battle River (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 420 of 421)


April 7, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

A statement made by the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Motherwell) a few minutes ago brought to my mind a subject to which I have given a great deal of thought. He said that in order to make farming pay it was necessary to have a peasant proprietorship. Too many people have been thinking along these lines and making statements of this kind. At present, high as wages are, those paid on the farm do not equal those paid in other industries. That is one of the reasons why it is difficult to get the very best class of labour on the farm-and it is only the very best class of labour that you want on the farm. Just as much skill is required on the farm as is necessary in any other industry; in many respects a great deal more skill is required. This matter of a man working a farm on a family basis, that is, using his family to work that farm without wages, does not tend to the ultimate good of the country. When the people are ignorant you can do that sort of thing and keep the boys at home. But when they begin to know anything at all; when the boys and the girls go to school, they soon learn where the highest wages are paid. Just as soon as they are old enough to

810 COMMONS

Supply-Experimental Farms

work they will leave the farm for higher wages. You will never have a successful immigration until you put the farming industry on a business footing where it can be made to pay. I saw in the paper the other day that the farmer and labour elements would never agree, because while labour wanted an eight-hour day, the farmer wanted a fifteen-hour day. I want to assure the hon. members of this House that the farmers do not want a fifteen-hour day, and the sooner they get down to an eight or a ten-hour day the better they will be pleased, and the better it will be for the country. You can never build up a country by asking a certain part of it to work for fourteen or sixteen hours a day, while the rest of the country is working a much shorter day. We hear a great deal nowadays of the baek-to-the-land movement, but the people who are advocating that are the ones who do not intend to go back to the land themselves. Just as soon as the Government can demonstrate that farming conducted on rational lines can be made to pay like any other business, even if a few extra hours have to be put in, then you will have immigrants coming to this country and they will stay here. But as long as you are content with saying that farming can only pay when it is conducted on the family basis, where the family work themselves without wages, you will never populate the country.

Topic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS
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April 6, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

I am going to give the House the type of advertising that was circulated in the States some years ago to attract immigrants to this country, because I hope that future advertising will not be along the same lines. Referring to the western provinces, where settlers were invited to take up land, the advertisement ran something like this:

It was a common thing up there for the farmers to grow from forty to fifty bushels of Number One wheat to the acre. What one man can do, another can do. Those farmers up there have more real money to spend than any other people on the American continent.

We have been wondering why people attracted to this country by such immigration pamphlets do not remain here. Is it surprising that immigrants become disgusted, and leave when this sort of pamphlet entices them to pick up gold bricks, and instead they find a lot of hard work. I hope that this is not the sort of advertisement that is going to be circulated in future, unless we want to lose most of the immigrants who are attracted to this country by such misrepresentation.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ACKNOWLEDGEMENT BY THE GOVERNOR GENERAL OF THE ADDRESS
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April 3, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

On page 87 there is an item, "Chief, sheep and goat division, $3,210." Will the minister tell me what the duties of this gentleman are?

Topic:   SUPPLY-AGRICULTURE
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March 31, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

I understand that Mr. Duncan Marshall is in the employ of the Department of Agriculture. Which of these positions does this official fill?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE BILL
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May 10, 1904

Mr. SPEAICER.

Will the hon. member allow me to state what I understand the rule to be, and then, if it is the desire of the House that he shall speak on the subject, I

28G6-

shall say no more ? The rule, as laid down in Peel, is.

The discussion on a matter of personal explanation strictly limited to the members directly concerned. It is not in order for other hon. members to intervene.

Topic:   PERSONAE EXPLANATION-MR. E. B.
Subtopic:   OSLER, M.P.
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