Henry Elvins SPENCER

SPENCER, Henry Elvins

Personal Data

Party
United Farmers of Alberta
Constituency
Battle River (Alberta)
Birth Date
March 7, 1882
Deceased Date
October 1, 1972
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Elvins_Spencer
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c59fd096-6883-4701-81c3-6f45cd624771&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, printer, publisher

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Battle River (Alberta)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
PRO
  Battle River (Alberta)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
UFA
  Battle River (Alberta)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
UFA
  Battle River (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 419 of 421)


May 2, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

What are the salaries of the Pension Commissioners?

Topic:   MONTREAL HARBOUR COMMISSION
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April 20, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

Mr. Chairman, we have heard a great deal about the need of getting farmers to engage in mixed farming. I come from a district where we have been engaged in mixed farming ever since that country was settled, and I do not see any difference between the financial status of

Supply-Live Stock

our farmers and those of any other district. They are all pretty well on rock bottom financially at the present time. We have heard a great deal, especially from the hon. member for Victoria (Mr. Tolmie), about shipping our unfinished stock out of the country instead of finishing them at home as we ought to do. The main reason in my opinion why stock is sent out of the country unfinished is not because the farmers want to sell them, but because they have to. Most of the unfinished stock is sent out simply for the reason that farmers are forced to raise money to meet their bills at a time when stock is at a very low figure. Furthermore, the farmer has to spend a certain amount in preparation for feeding stock in a proper way. In my district, where the farmers mostly go in for mixed farming, they have not had the means whereby to fit themselves to feed their stock, and the chief reason why they have not finished their cattle up to the point they should is that they have been forced to meet their bills in the fall.

The hon member for Victoria also said something about sheep, and that lambs were fetching a good price. I want to point out to him that lambs of the very best quality were sold from my district last fall at $6 per head. If he thinks that is a good price, those who are engaged in raising lambs will differ from him. A good deal has been said in regard to the raising of sheep, and that we do not raise a sufficient number in this country. With that statement I absolutely agree. I do not know of a country in the world where sheep can be raised with such success as in Canada, but at the same time when you are in the position that the farmers in my district are in,-and I take it that that district is like many others in Canada- where your returns from your wool are only sufficient to pay for the shearing of the sheep, there is no encouragement to go into that class of farming.

As far as the hog industry is concerned I am absolutely in sympathy with the hon. member for Saltcoats (Mr. Sales). The only reason the farmers went out of the raising of hogs was because they were starved out of it. Just as soon as the farmers are guaranteed a reasonable profit, not a big one, but a reasonable profit in proportion to the price of the grain they grow, they will go in for raising hogs. But just as long as the packers who control prices can force them to a starvation price

when they wish, they are not going into hog raising.

We have also heard a great deal about the cattle embargo. It is something we would all very much like to see removed, and I think if we, as Canadians, were a little more willing to remove the embargo on British goods we might get a little sympathy from the other side.

The Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Motherwell) has mentioned chores, and I was reminded of the fact that the chores in the country are done when those people who favour daylight saving so strongly, are either in bed or at their club. The chores are done before the daylight saver has thought of going to business, and during the greater part of the year by lamp light. Some of the farmers in my district ship cream, and others are milking only enough for their own needs, and the reason is because they have the greatest difficulty in getting labour to milk. They cannot get men who will put in the long hours necessary on the dairy farm when they can get better wages in the cities.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARY ACT AMENDMENT
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April 19, 1922

1. How many dollars in Dominion notes were passed over by the hon. Finance Minister White to Mackenzie and Mann on the guaranteed bonds of the Canadian Northern Railway?

2. How many dollars in Dominion notes did Mr. White, as Minister of Finance, pay to the Grand Trunk Railway on bonded security?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DOMINION NOTES
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April 10, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

What was the amount of Excise Duties collected by the Dominion Government on imported liquors, by provinces, during the years 1919, 1920 and 1921?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPORTED LIQUORS
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April 10, 1922

Mr. SPENCER:

1, What was the total cost of the Milk inquiry held by Major Duncan Stewart in Calgary, Alherta, from January 23, 1920 to June 17, 1921?

2. What amount did Major Duncan Stewart receive per day for his services, and what was the total amount received by him?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CALGARY MILK INQUIRY
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