Thomas Hubert STINSON

STINSON, Thomas Hubert, K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Victoria (Ontario)
Birth Date
February 26, 1883
Deceased Date
January 29, 1965
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Hubert_Stinson
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c4a99832-e80f-4388-8e64-c14b25943a41&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Victoria (Ontario)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Victoria (Ontario)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Victoria (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 13)


June 6, 1935

Mr. T. H. STINSON (Victoria, Ontario) moved:

That for the remainder of the session all private bills when presented be read a first and second time and referred forthwith, and that standing order 105 respecting the posting of private bills be suspended.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
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May 22, 1935

Mr. STINSON:

I was paired with the

hon. member for South Bruce (Mr. Hail). Had I voted, I would have voted to sustain the Speaker's ruling.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF CAMPS
Subtopic:   MOTION TO ADJOURN THE HOUSE TO DISCUSS THE SITUATION IN VANCOUVER
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March 11, 1935

1. In what year was the initial grant made to the Trent Valley canal extension, better known as the Newmarket canal?

2. Who w-as the sitting member of the riding of North York at the time the initial grant was made?

3. In what year was the work commenced and how much money was spent in that year?

4. Has there been any return from the said expenditure for power, rentals, or otherwise?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NEWMARKET CANAL-INITIAL GRANT
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March 6, 1935

Mr. STINSON:

I am very much interested in this vote, as there is in my riding one of the finest tourist districts in the dominion, namely, the Kawartha lakes and the highlands of Haliburton. That whole section is dotted with lakes and rivers and has all the natural beauties which appeal to the tourist. The county of Haliburton has 550 named lakes and just as many unnamed, waiting for the tourist to christen them. This is a vote that should commend itself to all members of this house by reason of the annual crop to be harvested from it and its possibilities for increase. The Dominion Bureau of Statistics shows that in the peak year 1929 Canada's tourist trade had a value of $309,379,000. By 1933 this had shrunk to $117,124,000. The evidence before the Senate committee last year set $500,000,000 as the objective of a progressive, permanent program of Canadian tourist trade promotion. We should set up a tourist bureau to "sell Canada" to the world, as no other country has more to sell by way of scenery or a greater variety than we have. Ontario has been getting between seventy and seventy-five per cent of the tourist trade coming into Canada. In 1929 we had in Ontario 11,685,000 persons, which figure in 1933 dropped to

7,796,000. Now therefore is the time to make a strong effort for this trade. In 1929 the American tourists spent outside their own country $869,000,000. Ontario has many ports of entry easy of access. Within twelve hours we have 20,000,000 persons adjacent to the province of Ontario-tourists who may come from the states of Michigan, Illinois, Ohio New York and Pennsylvania. These states all have paved roads right through to Ontario. Ontario has 6,000 miles of paved roads to take care of them when they arrive. The tourist crop is an annual crop which does not impoverish the land. It is not a wasting asset like a gold mine or an oil well. You can sell the scenery year after year and your only expense is advertising and developing ways and means of attracting the tourists. The road wear and tear they pay for in the gasoline tax. Everybody benefits from the tourist traffic-the transportation companies, hotels, oil and gasoline refineries, bus lines, department stores-and it is said by some

Supply-Railways-Tourists

that the tourist trade helps every man, woman and child in Canada, whether they make sewer pipes or grow onions. When you consider the possibilities of increasing that trade up to $500,000,000, it is something worth going after in a big way, as it represents the sale of 700,000,000 bushels of wheat at 70 cents a bushel, which is a two year wheat crop for Canada. We have the lakes and rivers and the fish, which delight the American tourist. Let us build a national business out of it. At Bobcaygeon, which is a very progressive village on Sturgeon and Pigeon lakes, where the fishing is good, a wonderful tourist business has been built up over a number of years. An American from southern Pennsylvania, who has been going there for years to fish, got into an argument with an American from New York city as to the merits of the latter city. The man from Pennsylvania, who cares more for good fishing than for anything else in the world, said that New York could never be an important place to him because it was too far away from Bobcaj'geon. Any hon. members who doubt the beauty of the Kawartha lakes and the highlands of Haliburton I invite to spend their next vacation there. I am sure they would say with the Pennsylvanian that New York can never be great in the summer time when it is so far away from Bobcaygeon Let me say once more that this item should commend itself to every member of the house by reason of the return it will give in dividends to the citizens of Canada. I think we should all support it and endeavour to increase our tourist trade to at least $500,000,00C per annum, which would bring a dividend in some form to every citizen of the dominion.

Topic:   RAILWAYS AND CANALS
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June 30, 1934

Mr. STINSON:

I was paired with the hon. member for South Bruce (Mr. Hall). Had I voted, I would have voted against the amendment.

Topic:   DOMINION FRANCHISE ACT
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