Lincoln MacCauley ALEXANDER

ALEXANDER, The Hon. Lincoln MacCauley, P.C., C.C., K.St.J., O.Ont., C.D., Q.C., LL.B., LL.D

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Hamilton West (Ontario)
Birth Date
January 21, 1922
Deceased Date
October 19, 2012
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Alexander
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c1f28411-ee02-4c23-9765-00b8c66fa99b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister and solicitor, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Hamilton West (Ontario)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Hamilton West (Ontario)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Hamilton West (Ontario)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Hamilton West (Ontario)
  • Minister of Labour (June 4, 1979 - March 2, 1980)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Hamilton West (Ontario)
  • Minister of Labour (June 4, 1979 - March 2, 1980)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 880 of 880)


September 20, 1968

Mr. Lincoln M. Alexander (Hamilton West):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to thank you for giving me this opportunity of speaking to this first session of the twenty eighth parliament as the representative for Hamilton West. To me this is a privilege and an honour which I shall long remember because it is at this time that I feel a sense of involvement and belonging.

I begin by congratulating you, sir, on your election as Speaker and informing you that there can be no doubt in my mind, after listening to the many plaudits extended to you, that we shall continue to be directed by

TMr. Lambert (Bellechasse) .1

your excellent guidance and leadership. My congratulations are also extended to the Deputy Speaker, whose ability has been recognized. I, as well as many others, particularly those sitting in this house for the first time, have been very impressed with the way you have been discharging your responsibilities, being knowledgeable, impartial and giving evidence of your wit.

My sincerest congratulations are extended to the hon. member for Madawaska-Victoria (Mr. Corbin) and the hon. member for Kam-loops-Cariboo (Mr. Marchand), both of whom, because of their seriousness of thought and ability to communicate, have gained the respect and admiration of this entire house.

I would also like to bring to your attention, sir, that at this moment I am very conscious of a meeting that I had in Toronto some time in 1964 with the right hon. member for Prince Albert (Mr. Diefenbaker). It was there and then that he, in his wisdom and experience, believed that I should be engaged in politics as a candidate because, as he stated, he had faith and confidence in my ability and believed that I could and would make a contribution toward the ultimate destiny of Canada. For this I am extremely grateful.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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September 20, 1968

Mr. Alexander:

Mr. Speaker, there are no words that can adequately express my thanks and those of my family for this great honour. Therefore I can only say with deep sincerity and conviction that I am profoundly grateful for this unprecedented honour and I shall do my utmost to become a worthy member of parliament under the leadership of the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Stanfield), who has continually encouraged and counselled me, and the guidance of many hon. members on both sides of this house who have expressed an interest in my political career, sanctioned, I fervently pray, by Him without whom all goals are unattainable.

September 20, 1968

I am privileged to say that I was born in Ontario, the province of opportunity, the province to which many people in Canada look for leadership because it has progressed so dynamically, welcoming all peoples, regardless of race, creed or colour, desirous of contributing to its phenomenal growth and sharing its wealth and the good life. Within that province is the city in which I live, the city that has adopted me and propelled me with jet-like propulsion to the House of Commons.

In view of the time allotted to me, and because I would like to make some observations on other matters, I cannot recite a complete and adequate picture of the city of Hamilton, or in fact my riding of Hamilton West, one of four in the city that escaped Trudeaumania, much to the disbelief and bewilderment of the Grits. In any event, I find it necessary to speak about some of the important points of Hamilton because, as I understand it, a member is likely not to have another opportunity.

I would like to commence by pointing out to you, Mr. Speaker, and hon. members that Hamilton had another first in the person of Hon. Ellen Fairclough, Canada's first woman cabinet member, who no doubt is warmly remembered by many hon. members because of her outstanding contribution to this house.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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September 18, 1968

Mr. Lincoln Alexander (Hamilton West):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to direct my question to the Secretary of State. In view of the backlog of citizenship applications in centres because of citizenship court judge vacancies, could the minister advise whether all appointments of citizenship court judges have been made, thereby filling the vacancies?

Topic:   CANADA COUNCIL
Subtopic:   PAYMENT OF EXPENSES OF ARTIST FROM NEW YORK
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