Douglas FEE

FEE, Douglas, B.Ed.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Red Deer (Alberta)
Birth Date
July 21, 1944
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Fee
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c14a576f-4677-40aa-9055-2e18a6132949&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
personnel manager, teacher, vice-principal

Parliamentary Career

November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Red Deer (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 37 of 39)


April 13, 1989

Mr. Fee:

Mr. Speaker, I do not mind answering those questions at all. I am proud of what has happened with the Government. I am not necessarily proud nor pleased with the state of the agricultural economy in this country.

If the Hon. Member listened to my comments, he would have heard me say that farmers in this country have been devastated for the last few years. If it had not been for the subsidy programs put in place by our Government, I do not think we would have a viable agricultural sector in Canada now.

Those of us who are new to the House have a lot to learn. People must realize that when we discuss free trade there is a difference between what is affected by the GATT and what is affected by the Free Trade Agreement. When we discuss grapes, we are talking about something put in place by the GATT Agreement, not necessarily the Free Trade Agreement.

April 13, 1989

The Address-Mr. Caccia

The Hon. Member asks what I would do to encourage our Minister and the Government in regard to subsidies for farmers. I would encourage the Minister to carry on as he has. He has been holding meetings with farm groups and farmers from coast to coast in Canada. He is soliciting input from the people who are working there. He is getting their ideas and will formulate his policy based on the recommendations he gets from the people who are most effective. I think that will be the basis for good Government and positive programs in the months and years ahead.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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April 13, 1989

Mr. Fee:

We are very anxious for economic development, Mr. Speaker, but not at any cost. We see more and more every day how important the environment is to our health and well-being. The emergency debate last week discussed the devastating effects of the Valdez oil spill. We have all heard scientific reports about the greenhouse effect, the ozone layer and acid rain.

The people of Red Deer value the richness and the beauty of the land. This riding is a showcase for the very best that Alberta has to offer. We have the Rocky Mountains and a portion of Banff National Park in the West. We go from there to the ranch lands and the foothills which give way to the lush farmlands in scenic Red Deer River Valley in the east. The people of Red Deer exemplify what the Governor General was referring to when she said in the Throne Speech:

The Address-Mr. Fee

Canadians possess a unique sense of their relationship to the land, a

land whose vast, rich diversity has shaped their values and

experiences.

It is because people of Red Deer value and respect our natural resources, Mr. Speaker, that they applaud the Government's commitment to the environment. The Throne Speech makes it abundantly clear that this Government is fully committed to the principle of sustainable development as articulated in the Brund-tland Commission. We can have economic growth, and we can protect our environment.

This is a concern that we are facing right now in my riding. I mentioned the Caroline area gas development group. This project has raised some serious questions about the effect of the industry on the environment and on our life-style. A very good dialogue has been established between the developers and the residents in the Caroline-Rocky Mountain House corridor. The developers have met with local land owners and concerned groups. They have established a local advisory council. I am confident that this consultative process will continue.

Having been the mayor of a small town for the last 11 years, I know first-hand the difficulties that municipalities have faced with regard to waste management. There is an accepted need for better handling of all our wastes.

I want to salute the initiative taken by the Government of Alberta with respect to hazardous materials. It has established, developed and is operating a special waste management facility at Swan Hills, where hazardous wastes can be safely disposed of in an environmentally conscious manner.

We realize the world is facing an environmental challenge. It is a challenge that goes beyond municipal, provincial and federal levels. It is international. Pollution obeys no borders. All of us must be concerned. Everyone must be involved.

There are many challenges ahead of us. Like the people of my constituency, I am not afraid of challenges, I like them. Our challenge is to make this remarkable country an even better place to leave to our children. I look forward to working with my colleagues on both sides of the House in contributing toward that goal.

April 13, 1989

The Address-Mr. Fee

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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April 13, 1989

Mr. Doug Fee (Red Deer):

Mr. Speaker, like my hon. colleague, I too welcome the opportunity to participate in the Throne Speech debate. Every time I enter this Chamber I do so with a profound sense of gratitude to the electorate of Red Deer who entrusted me with the privilege and responsibility of representing and speaking for them. On their behalf, it is my intention to work as diligently as possible to make certain that their views are heard by this Government.

We in Alberta were very pleased that the honour of moving the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne was given to an Albertan. I would like to congratulate the Hon. Member for Calgary Southeast (Mr. Richardson) and the Hon. Member for Bourassa (Mrs. Gibeau) on the excellent speeches they gave to introduce this debate.

Although the two Hon. Members represent ridings that are very distant from each other, and they each spoke in one of the official languages of Canada, they articulated a common vision for Canada. In the Throne Speech Her Excellency the Governor General outlined the Government's vision for the country. She laid out the goals and priorities for this mandate. I want to take this opportunity to reflect and discuss how these issues will affect my riding.

The Address-Mr. Fee

On November 21 of last year the voters of Red Deer returned a Member to the Progressive Conservative Government. They voted for the Canadian-American Free Trade Agreement. They voted for fiscal responsibility. They voted for the Party best able to govern. In Red Deer they voted for the Government, the first Government in many years, that paid attention to the issues and concerns of westerners.

In 1984, the Government that took office recognized the needs and aspirations of the regions of the country and set about to rectify some longstanding ill feelings. The Prime Minister (Mr. Mulroney) showed real leadership in bringing together the First Ministers to discuss constitutional change. Through co-operation and effort he reached a milestone in constitutional history, the Meech Lake Accord, an Accord supported by all 10 Premiers and all three federal Parties. This spirit of conciliation and harmony laid the groundwork for a more unified, dynamic and competitive country. Prior to 1984, Mr. Speaker, Red Deer, like the rest of Alberta, was deep in the throes of a recession that had been fueled in part by the disastrous national energy policy, a policy which devastated the small Canadian-owned service companies. The Government dismantled this program. We also got rid of the petroleum gas revenue tax. As a first step in the mandate of the first session of this Parliament we achieved secure access to the huge U.S. market by means of the Free Trade Agreement.

To quote the well known Alberta journalist who has not always been in support of this Party, "If Brian Mulroney can achieve the free trade with the United States, he will have done more for western Canada than any other Prime Minister in Canadian history".

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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April 13, 1989

Mr. Fee:

This Government was there when farmers needed it, whether because of low prices or drought. If not for the billions of dollars paid in support during the last four years, there would have been many more farms lost. The problems that are facing agriculture are complex. They are not going to be solved overnight, but this Government, through its Ministers, is working with farm groups and actively pursuing reform of the crop insurance system and a stabilization program in order to provide farmers with a more secure market-oriented environment.

The fundamental problem facing farmers across the country is one of uncertainty. We cannot go on responding to emergencies on an ad hoc basis. We need to have a system in place that will allow farmers to plan for the long term.

Agricultural reform is also needed at the international level. International trade subsidy wars are devastating our farming economy. Rural subsidies now cost approximately $200 billion a year. I believe that our farmers are the very best in the world. Our products are quality products. We can compete against anybody, but it is difficult to compete against the world treasuries of other Governments. Canada and this Government have taken a leadership role in negotiations to eliminate unfair agricultural subsidies. I congratulate the Minister of State for Grains and Oilseeds (Mr. Mayer) and his officials for their part in the recent GATT negotiations at Geneva that achieved some significant agreement in this area.

There are those who say the West has been ignored. They have not been paying attention. This Government has been listening and acting, and will continue to listen and act for the West and for all of Canada.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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April 13, 1989

Mr. Fee:

The positive impact of the Free Trade Agreement has already been felt. We have seen increased investment in Alberta. In my riding a consortium headed by Shell Canada is planning to invest some $700 million to build a state-of-the-art natural gas and sulphur recovery plant near Caroline, Alberta. The plant is going to create some 1,200 construction jobs and over 150 permanent jobs. Over $17 million a year will be pumped into our local economy.

April 13, 1989

The Address-Mr. Fee

Another positive example: Just north of my riding, Novacor Chemicals is investing some $600 million to expand its petro-chemical plant in Joffre. According to the president of Novacor himself, "This investment would not have happened without the Free Trade Agreement". Access to the U.S. market and lower tariffs will create 200 new permanent jobs in Joffre.

Agriculture is still critical to the economy of my constituency, Mr. Speaker. For a variety of reasons known to most of the Members of this House farmers are hurting. Some have lost their farms, but when you talk to the farmers, they acknowledge that never has a government done so much for agriculture as has the Conservative Government in the last four years.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Full View Permalink