Jean-Guy DUBOIS

DUBOIS, Jean-Guy, LL.L.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Lotbinière (Quebec)
Birth Date
April 2, 1948
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Guy_Dubois
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=c0bce55a-06b7-4830-80d5-827eefd96696&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer, professor

Parliamentary Career

February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Lotbinière (Quebec)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment and Immigration (October 1, 1983 - June 29, 1984)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment and Immigration (June 30, 1984 - July 9, 1984)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 42)


June 28, 1984

Mr. Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Employment and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to add a few words to what was said by the Hon. Member for Verdun-Saint Paul. With all my constituents in the riding of Lotbiniere, I wish to join the Hon. Member in congratulating the Prime Minister on receiving the Albert Einstein Foundation's international peace prize. The prize is a tribute to the Prime Minister, in recognition of his exceptional qualities and his efforts for peace in this world.

Mr. Speaker, I have only one wish for the Prime Minister: That he wins the Nobel Peace Prize. I think that throughout the world, the Prime Minister is widely known and recognized as a great statesman and great leader. I believe that with the prize bestowed on him yesterday, the Nobel Peace Prize would be the crowning of a very brilliant career. I think he deserves to win this prize and that Canadians would be delighted if he did. That is what I wish him, now that he is about to retire as Prime Minister. I am sure all Canadians would see this nomination as something to be proud of, both for the Prime Minister and for the entire country.

Topic:   TRIBUTE TO PRIME MINISTER
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June 27, 1984

Mr. Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Employment and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to speak very briefly to the amendment to Clause 6, where it refers to Section 59.2 of the Canada Labour Code, proposed by the New Democratic Party. Originally, the Canada Labour Code, as the previous speaker just said, prescribed a period of twelve months, and when Bill C-34 was introduced, this was reduced to three months, more or less as proposed in the amendment by the New Democratic Party.

Very briefly, Mr. Speaker, the groups that testified before the Committee of Labour, Manpower and Immigration, especially those representing management and obviously those representing workers who are all very much in favour of the Bill. In all fairness to the employers, we cannot really say that they are against the Bill but they did use a term, and this term was used by Mr. Masters who is President of or represents a group called Fetco . . . employees who fall under federal jurisdiction and work for a Crown Corporation. He said quite simply to bring in a balanced bill. So, regarding the existing period of twelve months and the three-month period proposed in the Bill, we felt in Committee and also in the Government that to balance the situation and strike a bargain that would be fair to both workers and employers, a period of six months would be entirely reasonable.

June 27, 1984

I was very pleased to hear my hon. friend from the Progressive Conservative Party say that he wanted the period to be set at six months. I know that on their side, they supported the amendment I proposed on behalf of the Government, which meant that all employees with six months' continuous service shall be entitled to what we provide under Clause 59.2.

Since we were talking about more balanced legislation, in Committee all three Parties tried to deal equitably and fairly with the groups appearing before us. I know that the Progressive Conservative Party was very much in favour of the six-month amendment, and that the Government proposed the six-month amendment since it wanted to expedite this Bill.

As for the three-month proposal, I myself and other Government members believed that going from twelve months to three months was too great a step and that some kind of compromise was preferable. Of course such compromises are necessary whenever a Bill is considered in Committee by the various parties, and I believe that this time we were very successfull, considering both the time element and the number of witnesses that were heard. We were able to reach an agreement among the Parties so that the Bill could be reported back to the House without delay. Mr. Speaker, that is why, if we are talking about balanced legislation, I feel that we should vote against the amendment proposed by the New Democratic Party and that we should proceed with the Bill as amended. I think we should put the question on this Bill unless some of my hon. friends have further comments to make.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA LABOUR CODE
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June 27, 1984

Mr. Dubois:

Mr. Speaker, concerning what my colleague opposite just said, I was in the House when the Member for Willowdale (Mr. Peterson) rose on a point of order. He did not mention consultation. He asked for unanimous consent, and I want to set the record straight. He only asked for unanimous consent to table the report of the Standing Committee on Finance, Trade and Economic Affairs, in connection with Bill C-36. That is what he said in the House. In any case, my hon. friend will be able to check the record in Hansard tomorrow. He never mentioned consultation, he just asked for unanimous consent and that is when the Hon. Member's colleague behind him, the Hon. Member for Dartmouth-Halifax East (Mr. Forrestall), rose and asked to see what it was. As far as I know, there never was any consultation. He just asked for, and obtained, the unanimous consent of the House to table this report.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   WESTERN GRAIN STABILIZATION ACT
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June 27, 1984

Mr. Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Employment and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker-

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADA LABOUR CODE
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June 27, 1984

Mr. Jean-Guy Dubois (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister of Employment and Immigration):

Mr. Speaker, regarding the comments we are hearing from the opposite side of the House, I appreciate the remarks about the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (Mr. Chretien). However, when they start talking about loyalty, I would like to talk about their Leader, who, if we consider his loyalty to Mr. Claude Wagner and to the Right Hon. Member for Yellowhead (Mr. Clark), was the first one to start back-stabbing! I suggest Progressive Conservative Members think about that for a minute.

However, Mr. Speaker, my comments today were to be about the campaign launched at noon by the Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion (Mr. Lumley), the Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs (Mrs. Erola) and the Minister of Labour (Mr. Ouellet) under the slogan: Think about it, think Canadian. The purpose of the campaign is to promote Canadian products and urge Canadians to buy products manufactured here in Canada at competitive prices. The launching was attended by the Canadian Manufacturers Association, the Retailers Association, many businessmen and people from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, who said they were very pleased to be taking part in this campaign to promote Canadian products. This initiative by the Government of Canada is certainly something to be pleased about, and Canadians should be urged to think Canadian whenever purchasing products for their own use. The slogan "Think about it, think Canadian" is well suited, Mr. Speaker, to the present Government of Canada, and I am sure that Canadians will also think about it at the next election . .. and think about the Liberal Party of Canada.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE
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