Gerald Augustine REGAN

REGAN, The Hon. Gerald Augustine, P.C., Q.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Halifax (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
February 13, 1929
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Regan
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=bdbc0007-d008-479f-bbd4-613f7730360d&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister and solicitor, commercial lawyer, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Labour (March 3, 1980 - September 21, 1981)
  • Minister of State (Sports) (March 3, 1980 - March 5, 1980)
  • Minister of Amateur Sport (March 6, 1980 - September 29, 1982)
  • Secretary of State of Canada (September 22, 1981 - September 29, 1982)
  • Minister of State (International Trade) (September 30, 1982 - December 6, 1983)
  • Minister for International Trade (December 7, 1983 - June 29, 1984)
  • Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (June 30, 1984 - September 16, 1984)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 269)


April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

Is there an echo in here?

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

We must remember that the Soviet Union has spent 15 times as much on strategic defences as we have over the last 10 years, while their record of compliance with existing arms treaties continues to be a cause for concern. Most people do not understand that Mutual Assured Destruction has left our populations absolutely defenceless. This is an intolerable situation; the truly moral course is to move forward quickly with a new strategy of peace-based not on the ability to threaten lives, but on our confidence that we can save them. Let us choose a defence that truly defends.

As we have pursued better relations with the Soviet Union, we have laboured to deal realistically with the basic issues that divide that nation from the free world. Our insistence that the Soviet Union adhere to its Helsinki human rights agreement is not just a moral imperative; we know that no nation can truly be at peace with its neighbours if it is not at peace with its own people.

In recent months, we have heard hopeful talk of change in Moscow, of a new openness. Some political prisoners have been released; the BBC is no longer jammed-we welcome these positive signs and hope that they are only the first steps toward a true liberalization of Soviet society.

To the extent the Soviet Union truly opens its society-to that extent its economy and the life of its people will improve; to that extent we may hope its aggression will diminish.

Disappointingly, however, there so far has been little movement on the Soviet side toward the peaceful settlement of regional conflicts that today are flaring across the globe.

Despite announcements of ceasefires and talk of national reconciliation, the Soviet's terrible war against Afghanistan remains unabated-and Soviet attacks on neighbouring Pakistan have escalated dangerously. In Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Angola, the Soviet Union continues to support brutal wars of Communist Governments against their own people. In Nicaragua, we see such a campaign on our own shores-

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

Yes, we have differences, disputes, as any two sovereign nations will. But we are always able to work them out, entre amis.

April 7, 1987

One area of particular concern to all Canadians, I know, is the problem of acid rain. When the Prime Minister and I met in Quebec two years ago, we appointed two distinguished Envoys, Bill Davis and Drew Lewis, to examine the problem. They issued a joint report, which we have endorsed, and we are actively implementing many of their recommendations.

The first phase of our clean coal technology program is under way. It is the beginning of a $6 billion commitment through 1992, and I have asked Congress for the full share of government spending recommended by the Envoys-$2.5 billion-for the demonstration of innovative pollution control technologies over the next five years.

Literally thousands of firms and millions of jobs will be affected by whatever steps we take on this problem, so there are no quick and easy answers. However, working together, we have made an important start. I am convinced that, as in the past, our disputes will bring us closer as we find a mutual accord, and our differences will become only another occasion for co-operation. Let me assure you that your concerns are my concerns.

I was struck recently by the words of a Canadian-a Hungarian Canadian you might call him-who came to this country, as so many before him, to escape oppression. He said: "I wanted to stretch. I needed a place where I could move mountains or carry larger stones than Sisyphus, and here was the place for it-nobody telling me what I'm supposed to believe as a Canadian-gave me a kind of freedom for my mind and my spirit and my creative energies that I had never experienced before in life. (And) I found that, for me, anyhow, anything could be possible here".

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June 21, 1984

Hon. Gerald Regan (Minister for International Trade):

Mr. Speaker, first I would like to say that the jobs of workers in this area are very important to the Government. In the case mentioned by the Hon. Member, it is very important-

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   TEXTILE AND CLOTHING IMPORTS-GOVERNMENT ACTION TO PROTECT JOBS
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June 21, 1984

Mr. Regan:

Mr. Speaker, we must not forget that the Coaticook plant is not a modern one. Furthermore, we must bear in mind that our polyester imports do not come from countries where prices are lower than they are in Canada. Many of our imports are from the United States and Japan, which means we must develop modern and competitive plants in our own country.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   TEXTILE AND CLOTHING IMPORTS-GOVERNMENT ACTION TO PROTECT JOBS
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