Gerald Augustine REGAN

REGAN, The Hon. Gerald Augustine, P.C., Q.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Halifax (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
February 13, 1929
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Regan
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=bdbc0007-d008-479f-bbd4-613f7730360d&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister and solicitor, commercial lawyer, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Labour (March 3, 1980 - September 21, 1981)
  • Minister of State (Sports) (March 3, 1980 - March 5, 1980)
  • Minister of Amateur Sport (March 6, 1980 - September 29, 1982)
  • Secretary of State of Canada (September 22, 1981 - September 29, 1982)
  • Minister of State (International Trade) (September 30, 1982 - December 6, 1983)
  • Minister for International Trade (December 7, 1983 - June 29, 1984)
  • Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (June 30, 1984 - September 16, 1984)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 269)


April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

After the Allied victory over the Axis powers, America and Canada combined their efforts to help restore Europe to economic health. Those were golden years of international economic co-operation that saw the creation of GATT which knocked down the tariff barriers that had so damaged the world economy; the International Monetary Fund; and 30 years ago last month, the creation of the Common Market. The theme that ran through it all was free and fair trade. Free and fair trade was the lifeblood of a reinvigorated Europe, a revitalized free world that saw a generation of growth unparalleled in history.

We must keep these principles fixed in our minds as we move forward on Prime Minister Mulroney's free trade proposal, a proposal that, I am convinced, will prove no less historic. Already our two nations generate the world's largest volume of trade. The United States trades more with the Province of Ontario alone than with Japan. United States citizens are by far the principal foreign investors in Canada, and Canadians, on a per capita basis, are even greater investors in our country. This two-way traffic in trade and investment has helped to create new jobs by the millions, expand opportunity for both our peoples, and augment the prosperity of both our nations.

Prime Minister Mulroney's proposal would establish the largest free trade area in the world, benefiting not only our two countries but setting an example of co-operation to all nations that now wrestle against the siren temptation of protectionism. To those who would hunker down behind barriers to fight a destructive and self-defeating round of trade battles, Canada and the United States will show the positive way.

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

-offering a more stable and secure environment as we pursue our goal of deep reductions in nuclear weapons. We must move away from a situation of Mutual Assured Destruction-so aptly called MAD, the MAD policy.-We need defensive systems that threaten no one, that would save human lives instead of targeting them.

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

The surest sign that the Soviet Union truly wants better relations, that it truly wants peace, would be to end its global strategy to impose one-party dictatorships- allow the people of this world to determine their own futures, in liberty and peace. We know that when people are given the opportunity to choose, they choose freedom.

Truly, the future belongs to the free. In our own hemisphere, we have seen a freedom tide sweep over South and Central America: Six years ago, only 30 per cent of the people of Latin America lived in democracies-today, over 90 per cent do. Around the world, resistance movements are rising up to throw off the totalitarian yoke. Even in China, they debate the pace of reform but acknowledge its necessity.

On the border between Canada and the United States stands a plaque commemorating over a century and a half of friendship. It calls the border: "a lesson of peace to all nations", and that is what it is: a concrete, living lesson that the path to peace is freedom, that the relations of free peoples, no matter how different, no matter how distinct their national characters, will be marked by admiration, not hostility.

Go stand along the border at the beginning of July. You will see the Maple Leaf and the Stars and Stripes mixed in a swirling cloud of visitors and celebrants. As a Canadian writer once put it: "What's the difference between Dominion Day and July 4? About 48 hours".

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

We must remember that the Soviet Union has spent 15 times as much on strategic defences as we have over the last 10 years, while their record of compliance with existing arms treaties continues to be a cause for concern. Most people do not understand that Mutual Assured Destruction has left our populations absolutely defenceless. This is an intolerable situation; the truly moral course is to move forward quickly with a new strategy of peace-based not on the ability to threaten lives, but on our confidence that we can save them. Let us choose a defence that truly defends.

As we have pursued better relations with the Soviet Union, we have laboured to deal realistically with the basic issues that divide that nation from the free world. Our insistence that the Soviet Union adhere to its Helsinki human rights agreement is not just a moral imperative; we know that no nation can truly be at peace with its neighbours if it is not at peace with its own people.

In recent months, we have heard hopeful talk of change in Moscow, of a new openness. Some political prisoners have been released; the BBC is no longer jammed-we welcome these positive signs and hope that they are only the first steps toward a true liberalization of Soviet society.

To the extent the Soviet Union truly opens its society-to that extent its economy and the life of its people will improve; to that extent we may hope its aggression will diminish.

Disappointingly, however, there so far has been little movement on the Soviet side toward the peaceful settlement of regional conflicts that today are flaring across the globe.

Despite announcements of ceasefires and talk of national reconciliation, the Soviet's terrible war against Afghanistan remains unabated-and Soviet attacks on neighbouring Pakistan have escalated dangerously. In Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Angola, the Soviet Union continues to support brutal wars of Communist Governments against their own people. In Nicaragua, we see such a campaign on our own shores-

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

And on this, the Canadian people and the Members of Parliament have my word.

Freedom works. The democratic freedoms that secure the God-given rights of man, and the economic freedoms that open the door to prosperity-they are the hope and, we trust, the destiny of mankind.

If free trade is the lifeblood, free enterprise is the heart of prosperity.

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