Gerald Augustine REGAN

REGAN, The Hon. Gerald Augustine, P.C., Q.C., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Halifax (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
February 13, 1929
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerald_Regan
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=bdbc0007-d008-479f-bbd4-613f7730360d&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister and solicitor, commercial lawyer, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Halifax (Nova Scotia)
  • Minister of Labour (March 3, 1980 - September 21, 1981)
  • Minister of State (Sports) (March 3, 1980 - March 5, 1980)
  • Minister of Amateur Sport (March 6, 1980 - September 29, 1982)
  • Secretary of State of Canada (September 22, 1981 - September 29, 1982)
  • Minister of State (International Trade) (September 30, 1982 - December 6, 1983)
  • Minister for International Trade (December 7, 1983 - June 29, 1984)
  • Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (June 30, 1984 - September 16, 1984)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 269)


April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

Jobs, rising incomes, opportunity-they must be created, day to day, through the enterprise of free men and women. We have had to learn and re-learn this lesson in this century. In my own country, we have witnessed an expansion and strengthening of many of our civil liberties, but too often we have seen our economic liberties neglected, even abused. We have protected the freedom of expression of the author, as we should-but what of the freedom of expression of the entrepreneur, whose pen and paper are capital and whose profits and literature are the heroic epic of free enterprise, a tale of creativity and invention that not only delights the mind, but has improved the condition of man, feeding the poor with new grains, bringing hope to the ailing with new cures, vanquishing ignorance with wondrous new information technologies.

In the United States we have found a new consensus, among members of both Parties, in a reformed tax structure that lowers tax rates and frees the spirit of enterprise of our people. Today, that consensus is broadening as your great free market nation seeks the same path back to the first principles of economic growth through rate-reducing tax reform. We see movements in Germany and Japan, as well, to cut tax rates. But this must be only the beginning; for what is simply

beneficial to us is a matter of the most dire necessity to the nations and peoples of the developing world. And this is the second great example that, together, we offer to the nations of the world in desperate economic need. For the poorer, the more desperate their condition, the more urgently they need the growth that only economic freedom can bring.

We have seen time and again the healing, invigorating effects of economic freedom: tax rate cuts lifted both Germany and Japan out of post-war stagnation and into the forefront of the world economy; low tax rates catapulted the nations of the Pacific Basin out of the Third World, making them major economic partners today.

A recent study prepared for our Government found a direct relationship between the high tax rates and other statist policies of many underdeveloped countries and a cycle of deepening poverty and despair. On the other hand, the study found that countries with low tax rates and free market policies are among the fastest growing in the world, providing improved living standards and increased opportunity for all their people.

We apply the principles of economic freedom at home; we should not export central planning and statist economics abroad. When the Holy Father came to this country, he spoke of the moral obligation of the wealthier nations to share with those less fortunate-it is time to take up that challenge. Both our countries have been generous donors of foreign aid, and that is important.

But our own experience, the experience of this century, has shown that the only effective way to share prosperity is to share the conditions that generate prosperity. History has proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that statism spreads poverty; it is only freedom that begets wealth. Free markets, low tax rates, free trade-this is the most valuable foreign aid we can give to the developing nations of the Third World.

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

And on this, the Canadian people and the Members of Parliament have my word.

Freedom works. The democratic freedoms that secure the God-given rights of man, and the economic freedoms that open the door to prosperity-they are the hope and, we trust, the destiny of mankind.

If free trade is the lifeblood, free enterprise is the heart of prosperity.

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

We will overcome the impulse of economic isolationism with a brotherly embrace, an embrace, it is not too much to hope, that may some day extend throughout the Americas and ultimately encompass all free nations.

We can look forward to the day when the free flow of trade from the southern reaches of Tierra del Fuego to the northern outposts of the Arctic Circle, unites the people of the western hemisphere in a bond of mutually beneficial exchange, when all borders become what the U.S.-Canadian border so long has been-a meeting place rather than a dividing line.

April 7, 1987

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

Thank you all very much, and God bless you.

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April 7, 1987

Mr. Reagan:

This is your Canada, and our continent. This is the chosen place in history our two nations occupy: a land where the mind and heart of man are free; a land of peace; a land where, indeed, anything is possible.

May I add a word about our discussions today on two issues of critical interest to our two countries. The Prime Minister and I agreed to consider the Prime Minister's proposal for a bilateral accord on acid rain, building on the tradition of agreements to control pollution of our shared international waters.

The Prime Minister and I also had a full discussion of the Arctic waters issue, and he and I agreed to inject new impetus to the discussions already under way. We are determined to find a solution based on mutual respect for sovereignty and our common security and other interests.

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