Maurice Adrian DIONNE

DIONNE, Maurice Adrian, B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Miramichi (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
August 26, 1936
Deceased Date
November 17, 2003
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_A._Dionne
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ba852ff7-6032-40eb-a0ab-40ad79bdac9a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
school principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Northumberland--Miramichi (New Brunswick)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence (October 10, 1975 - September 30, 1977)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
LIB
  Northumberland--Miramichi (New Brunswick)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
LIB
  Northumberland--Miramichi (New Brunswick)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
LIB
  Miramichi (New Brunswick)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 213 of 214)


February 28, 1975

Mr. Dionne (Northumberland-Miramichi):

No trouble at all-can you? Much is said about freedom, and I subscribe to the view that we live in the most free society on this earth. I submit to you and to this honourable House, however, that as long as there are festering sores of economic disparity on the body politic, the national spirit cannot be truly free. While any person is enslaved to a life of drudgery to earn his daily bread, his spirit enjoys no freedom.

Atlantic Canada is the oldest and, in many senses, the richest part of this great nation. We have given much to the building of this new nation in social, cultural, spiritual, political and economic terms. We appreciate the efforts of recent federal governments to close the economic gap, and the present government has done more than any other. We also need the equalization grants and the efforts of DREE, but we must continue our efforts-indeed we must re-dedicate ourselves to the eradication of the disparities of which I have spoken. To do that we must keep our priorities in proper perspective. We cannot afford at this time to dilute our efforts toward the development of a

February 28, 1975

Cultural Centre

sound, diversified and stable economy. If we do, we shall soon find ourselves wallowing in a sea of confusion surrounded by lost opportunities and broken hope.

If we lose our perspective, if we fail to order our priorities, if we spend our federal grants on social and cultural frills, we shall have betrayed our trust and subjected future generations to the same economic hardships through which the present and many generations of our Atlantic fellows have so steadfastly laboured.

I hope the hon. gentleman gets his cultural centre at some future time, Madam Speaker, but in my opinion it is the wrong project at the wrong time. As Marie Antoinette learned to her sorrow, you must not feed the people cake when they have no bread.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS
Subtopic:   CAPE BRETON DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
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February 28, 1975

Mr. Dionne (Northumberland-Miramichi):

Madam Speaker, I have been trying to outline why I oppose this particular motion, and if hon. members would just take your advice we could get on with it. I will not be very much longer-

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS
Subtopic:   CAPE BRETON DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
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February 28, 1975

Mr. Dionne (Northumberland-Miramichi):

Yes,

Madam Speaker. If I want to attack the government- which I have not done-

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS
Subtopic:   CAPE BRETON DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
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February 13, 1975

Mr. Maurice A. Dionne (Northumberland-Miramichi):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the President of the Treasury Board if it is the policy of his department to attempt to decrease the wage disparity between public service employees in Atlantic Canada and public service employees in other areas of the country?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   PUBLIC SERVICE
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November 8, 1974

Mr. Maurice A. Dionne (Northumberland-Miramichi):

Madam Speaker, I agree with the sentiments expressed in this motion and I realize the inadequacy of the kind of transportation to which the hon. member refers. It surely must be recognized by all members of parliament that transportation has always been, and still is, a major concern of all the Atlantic provinces. We lag far behind the rest of the country, the far north excepted, in all forms of transportation-that is, air, highway, rail and water.

Thanks to the recognition of this problem by the federal government, the Atlantic provinces now have their sections of the trans-Canada highway. But this is only one route and it is obvious that these small provinces with small populations, and an even smaller industrial base, cannot build and maintain the kind of arterial highways which modern transportation systems require.

Hence the federal government will have to continue to assist, through such financial arrangements, the continued development of a modern system of highways in Atlantic Canada. The national railway, the CNR, seems to be and has been for years on a deliberate course of making rail transport as expensive and as difficult as possible. Nowadays it may cost more to send a single package by CN than the contents thereof are worth. And unless the article has a very long life span it will be obsolete, rotten, or dead, before it reaches its destination. If indeed it escapes all the aforementioned fates, it is liable to be bent, spindled or mutilated beyond recognition.

I might point out that very often by CN rail it takes freight at least two weeks to travel from Montreal to northeastern New Brunswick. A good deal of this delay is due to inefficiency and over-haul, whereby cargo is hauled beyond its destination, stored in a warehouse, and then hauled back again.

In the field of passenger service the railways have had even greater success in their aims and objectives than in freight and express. The trains normally run late; they are uncomfortable and slow. The officials are often indifferent or even discourteous, and unless one is a millionaire it is necessary to carry one's lunch along. Maintenance is inadequate, both on the roadbed and the rails, judging from the frequent derailments experienced in Atlantic Canada.

Air service as well leaves a great deal to be desired. The national carrier obviously gives thought to Atlantic Canada only as an afterthought. The service of the regional carrier, Eastern Provincial Airways, is much, much more personalized service than the national carrier, but its scheduling requires a great deal more thought and imagination. It does little good to substitute a slow daily plane for an occasional fast one that comes in only occasionally.

You, may well ask Madam Speaker, what all this has to do with the motion we are now discussing. The answer, of course, is that I am trying to put this problem in context vis-a-vis the entire problem of transportation in Atlantic Canada.

Obviously the most unsatisfactory form of transportation by its very nature is ferry service. But the government of Canada has invested a great deal in providing better ferry service between Newfoundland and the mainland, and between Prince Edward Island and the mainland. Having said that, I sympathize with the sentiments behind this motion. I must ask, however, whether its implementation would not have the effect of cutting off one's nose to spite one's face.

Can one logically expect, in view of the present high subsidies, to lower fares substantially and at the same time increase service? I would suggest, however, that a look should be taken at the rate structure. It might be well to base the charge on a flat rate for a car and all of its occupants, so that families will not be penalized unduly. Does it cost more to transport a family of six than a family of four? In conclusion, Madam Speaker, I cannot support this motion because its net effect would be to create yet another disparity in Atlantic Canada.

Topic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' MOTIONS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORT
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