George SPOTTON

SPOTTON, George

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Huron North (Ontario)
Birth Date
March 23, 1877
Deceased Date
April 20, 1936
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Spotton
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=ba3650e7-a4d8-4fb8-8d43-805b396ec85a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman

Parliamentary Career

September 12, 1927 - May 30, 1930
CON
  Huron North (Ontario)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Huron North (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 55)


April 2, 1935

Mr. SPOTTON:

At school I always noticed that the fellow who walked around with a chip on his shoulder wouldn't fight. I never saw the fellow around the barroom who took off his coat and rolled up his sleeves, fighting. I never boasted that I would be back; I do not know whether I will or not. That rests with my people, but I do know this, that from headquarters here they have sent up their chief-well one of the fellows in my riding calls him the chief statis-ishun; he got the word "statistician" mixed up-in the last ten days saying that Barkis was willing if they would give him the nomination. But I have nothing to say as to who will have it; that is not my job.

In 1911 twenty four years ago the present Prime Minister said in this house:

Too often it has been found that child labour and the work which has been undertaken, especially by married women, in the older countries has involved a loss of vital force in the succeeding generation, and' we Canadians- we in this young country-must, it seems to me, if we are true to our best traditions, realize that at best we hold this great land with its brilliant opportunities and its splendid resources as trustees for that posterity which will one day weigh us up in judgment 'for the manner in which we have discharged the trust reposed in us.

I do not think there has been a time in the history of the Canadian people when it was more apparent that we should have a band of trained experts capable of gathering at first hand full and accurate information for the benefit of the Canadian farmer, manufacturer and' workman than in the election that has just passed.

In my judgment, in this complex civilization of ours, the great struggle of the future will be between human rights and the property interests; and it is the duty and the function ot government to provide that there shall be no undue regard for the latter that limits or lessens the other.

It is of transcendent importance that this house and this parliament should be seized of the fact that the people demand that some tribunal shall be created that will have control over the extent of the issue of securities by public utility companies, and that the capitalization of industrial concerns should bear some just proportion to the outlay, and to the physical value of the enterprise which it represents.

It is essential that we in Canada, as the greatest partner, should extend our trade so far as possible among the British dominions and with the motherland.

The Budget-Mr. Spotton

If any hon. member has any doubt, I will give him a report of that speech. I would also refer him to a speech for which I thank the hon. member for Labelle (Mr. Bourassa). We in Ontario thought him a very fiery politician in days of old, but I am glad to know he was fair enough from his place in the house to pay a tribute to the sincerity of o'ur leader, the Prime Minister of Canada.

I would like to have said a word or two about the Farmers' Creditors Arrangement Act, but I will give just one incident that happened in a neighbouring county the other day. A young farmer was bowed down with a first mortgage of 85,000 with 8800 accumulated interest, and was paying six and a half per cent to some money Shylock. He had a second mortgage of $1,000 with $400 accumulated interest and was paying six per cent on it. Each year his back was bowed down by a burden of $461 of interest. The $5,800 mortgage was reduced to S5,000 and he gets that for five years at three per cent. The $1,400 mortgage was reduced to $1,200 and he gets that for ten years at two per cent, so that instead of having an interest burden of $461, which no farmer could bear, he went home happy making a new start in life with an interest charge of $174. I wish to thank the Minister of Finance on behalf of the farmers of Ontario, who have been turned down coldly on the word of the deputy minister of agriculture for Ontario, for increasing the amount to $90,000,000.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

March 21, 1935

Mr. SPOTTON:

Perhaps the hon. member for Vancouver South (Mr. Maclnnis) is not cheerful because he may lose his job.

Mr. MaeINNIS: I am not the only one

who is likely to lose his job, and I am afraid my hon. friend would find it more difficult to do hard work than I would. I have done it before and am quite willing to do it again, and that is more than can be said of some others. I say it is quite easy for the minister to be cheerful in the matter, but the record is not a cheerful one, and until we have a much more cheerful record and a much greater improvement I do not think there need be much crowing from the other side of the house. But even if conditions are improving, and let us say they are, the condition of the provinces and the municipalities is daily getting worse. Anyone who has been reading the papers from western Canada, from British Columbia, for instance, during the last few months, must realize the situation there. The city of Vancouver is practically bankrupt, and if it defaults I do not think there is any possibility of the province of British Columbia saving itself. It will be involved in the default of the city of Vancouver, and the same is true of the other western provinces as well.

I think it was the hon. member for Souris (Mr. Willis) who said this afternoon that some people think that governments are a

[Mr. Maclnnis.1

kind of Santa Claus, who should provide for everybody. As a matter of fact, if the people of Canada have the idea that the government is a sort of Santa Claus, it is the political parties of this country who have given them the idea, 'because in every election they come before the people and tell them, "Elect us and everything will be fine; we will see that you will have work and wages; unemployment will be ended; business will improve," and, all that sort of thing, without any help from the people themselves;, it is all going to be done by Santa Claus-the government. I have never led the people to believe that the government should be a Santa Claus. As a matter of fact, governments have nothing to give unless they first take it away from the people. Whatever they have they must first get in taxes, and taxes come out of produced wealth. Let us follow this a bit further.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT AND FARM RELIEF
Subtopic:   FURTHER PROVISION FOR CARRYING OUT RELIEF
Full View Permalink

February 28, 1935

Mr. SPOTTON:

But hard on the people.

Now this is a fact. I went to the agricultural development board, after they had dismissed Mr. Roadhouse, and I was in communication with Mr. Fairbairn and Mr. Page, and they informed me that there were no new loans. The president of the United Farmers' organization in Ontario, Mr. Robert J. Scott, together with the hon. member for Dufferin-iSimcoe and myself, lamented the fact that since last June the Hepburn administration has been very cruel to the farmers of Ontario. In our opinion they were striving to make it so severe that the farmers should lose the old homestead-they would make it hard for the farmers of Ontario so that it would have its effect on the next dominion election, because it can be nothing else than that. We have positive proof. Mr. Nixon, replying to Mr. Scott, is reported to have said that he was not listening much to Mr. Scott, the president of the United Farmers of Ontario organization, because he voted for George Spotton at the last election, and Mr. Scott replied that he had not voted for me. Sometimes I get discontented with my own party; but when I think

Farm Loan Act

of the puerile, the infantile and the senile remarks of the opposition, I think I am better off staying where I am. When Mr. Nixon said that the president of the United Farmers' organization of Ontario had voted for me, that gentleman, as I say, replied that he had not. But I care not whether he did vote for me or not; if he did not many others did. The fact of the matter is however that Mr. Nixon said that scores of new loans were being granted daily in Ontario, whereas I make bold to say that this was not the case; and that will be laid upon the records in Queens park in the very near future. Some members of this house get up and tell how many loans there were. Well, if there were any, they were granted, believe me, in their constituencies during a byelection.

Many Liberal farmers have come to me and told me their farms had not been inspected. They were kidded along until the snow was on the ground. My hon. friend from West Middlesex knows this; he is fair and he will agree with me when I say that they kidded the farmers along while that beautiful white blanket covered the farms, telling them that they could not inspect the farms until the spring, and then they hoped to pass the buck to the federal parliament. But these little wise-cracking, peanut, potato politicians in Queens park, Toronto, will not, so long as I am in the flesh, kid or fool the farmers of Ontario. We have just recently seen Mr. Marshall come out with a change of heart.

Topic:   CANADIAN FARM LOAN ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO FACILITATE AND INCREASE THE EXTENSION OF CREDIT TO FARMERS
Full View Permalink

February 28, 1935

Mr. SPOTTON:

If you think I made such a statement, Mr. Chairman, I shall withdraw it, but I made no such accusation against the clergy. .

I wish to say, Mr. Chairman, that m the province of Ontario we are not egotistical, but we have listened for a long time to members from the western provinces getting up and I think slandering and libelling their own provinces when they say that their municipalities are broke, and their provinces are broke, and everything is in dire straits, and that they cannot secure loans in the money markets of the world but have to come down to get this government's O.K. I say that there are only four or five old provinces-[DOT] Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island-that must therefore have that financial status which can help them out; and I do say that these western provinces do not show much gratitude. To these western members let me say that we have long remained silent in Ontario; but I appeal to them now-I am not trying to stir up anything of a sectional spirit- that the time has almost come when we shall have to have an Ontario consciousness. I appeal to the hon. member for West Middlesex, who I know is interested in agriculture; he represents an agricultural constituency, and I know from experience that he is sincerely interested in agriculture and in the advancement of that industry in his county. But I tell him that if he has not been sleeping with the Premier and Minister of Agriculture of Ontario he has been sleeping in an adjacent room. I am speaking figuratively, not literally.

Topic:   CANADIAN FARM LOAN ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO FACILITATE AND INCREASE THE EXTENSION OF CREDIT TO FARMERS
Full View Permalink

February 28, 1935

Mr. SPOTTON:

My farmers in the county of Huron who could not secure money elsewhere, from life insurance companies-

Topic:   CANADIAN FARM LOAN ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO FACILITATE AND INCREASE THE EXTENSION OF CREDIT TO FARMERS
Full View Permalink