Richard Burpee HANSON

HANSON, The Hon. Richard Burpee, P.C., K.C., B.A., LL.B., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
National Government
Constituency
York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
Birth Date
March 20, 1879
Deceased Date
July 14, 1948
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Hanson
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b9befc64-819d-4523-8a07-915e74257442&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

May 28, 1921 - October 4, 1921
CON
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
CON
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
CON
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
  • Minister of Trade and Commerce (November 17, 1934 - October 22, 1935)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  York--Sunbury (New Brunswick)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (May 14, 1940 - January 1, 1943)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 3461)


November 22, 1962

Mr. Hanson (York-Sunbury):

The question is largely academic now.

Correspondence on Surcharges

Topic:   FINANCE
Subtopic:   CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING SURCHARGE ORDER IN COUNCIL
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May 12, 1959

Hon. R. B. Hanson (Leader of the Opposition):

That is correct. I have striven vainly to understand the principles and details of this bill. Under ordinary circumstances counsel would take at least three days to brief this bill: I have had about four hours. I protest against any attempt to rush this bill through the house without adequate time for study, even before it comes to second reading. The bill, apart from any war measures that we have put through parliament, is the most important measure that I can recall for years, since the act of 1930 at any rate. It involves the annual expenditure of millions upon millions of dollars. There should be no rush to push it through the House of Commons, even if it is to be sent to a special committee.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS TO INCREASE RATES OF REMUNERATION AND CONTRIBUTIONS, ETC.
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May 12, 1959

Mr. Hanson:

I am prepared to stay.

So are we prepared to stay until we see this legislation put through in a proper manner. The prime minister of that time, Mr. Mackenzie King, went on to say:

In agreeing to have the bill sent to a special committee after the second reading I was seeking to oblige the Leader of the Opposition, who made the suggestion, and I propose to hold to the arrangement made. I have sought to expedite the step, since it has already been made abundantly clear that all parties in the house are agreed upon the principle of the bill. If my hon. friend feels that to take second reading tomorrow would not give him sufficient time to examine the bill, I am prepared to hold it until Monday. But I very much hope he may be ready tomorrow.

Prime Minister Mackenzie King appreciated the difficulties under which the opposition was labouring at the time, and did not hesitate to give the opposition the consideration asked for. Would it be too much to ask the present government to give the opposition the same consideration?

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS TO INCREASE RATES OF REMUNERATION AND CONTRIBUTIONS, ETC.
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April 1, 1955

Mr. Hanson (York-Sunbury):

That was only a chart.

Mr. Mackenzie King picked up that retort and then finally got down to the point where he said:

The resolution passed in 1919 was expressed in the following words:

"In so far as it may be practicable, having regard to Canada's financial position, an adequate system of insurance against unemployment, sickness,-

Unemployment Insurance Act

I am glad to see the Minister of National Health and Welfare nodding his head. I continue:

-dependence, old age, and other disability should be instituted by the federal government in conjunction with the governments of the several provinces."

Mr. King went on to say:

When the Liberal administration came into office in 1921 we indicated our hope that while we were in office we might soon be in a position to enact some measure of social insurance.

Topic:   COMPARATIVE TABLES
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June 11, 1951

Mr. Hanson (York-Sunbury):

This means that

the extra cent -

That is, the increase from one cent of tax to two cents of tax, making a total of four cents per letter.

-is an excise tax, not postage?

Topic:   II, 1951
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