Alfred Pullen GLEAVE

GLEAVE, Alfred Pullen

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Saskatoon--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
June 6, 1911
Deceased Date
August 19, 1999
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Gleave
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b93145cd-34e5-47e0-a52d-d85c71e31e53&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, grain grower, seed grower

Parliamentary Career

June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
NDP
  Saskatoon--Biggar (Saskatchewan)
  • N.D.P. Caucus Chair (January 1, 1968 - January 1, 1972)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
NDP
  Saskatoon--Biggar (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 312)


May 8, 1974

1* Bas the Minister of Agriculture received representations from the Creditors Committee of Creditors of Diversified Crops Limited, Rycroft, Alberta?

2. Has the government given a guarantee to these farmers that they will receive payments in full for the grain they delivered to Diversified Crops Limited?

3. What responsibilities, in respect of assuming liability, do (a) the Canadian Grain Commission (b) the Bonding Company assume?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Full View Permalink

May 6, 1974

Mr. Gleave:

Yes. The other day we heard demands in respect of the Unemployment Insurance Commission that the board of referees be bilingual. I told them that the language ought to be Russian or some other ethnic language because that would be a lot better in Saskatchewan. However, these are some of the policies the minister trots out. The Livestock Feed Board may even ask the Wheat Board to sell feed grains in the domestic market and cut off their export sales which have already been made. One reason we have this very poor export performance is this type of approach. Then the experts go on to say that in the next crop year if the Canadian Wheat Board does sell grain in the domestic market the only way they can establish a price is through the Winnipeg commodity exchange. This is the story that is told by newsmen on the CBC. This is the type of policy that is being worked out. Western feed grain will be bought and sold freely and not restricted to any quantity.

I got a kick out of hearing the minister say that they will be selling it to their neighbours but that their neighbours may be a fair piece away. I thought that was pretty good. This is the sort of program that is being proposed. It is the type of program we must consider in respect of this legislation. I think there are two responsibilities here with regard to this legislation. One is to see that it will operate in such a way that if the producer borrows the money he will have full expectation of being able to repay it by the only method he has, which is the delivery of grain. I think the other responsibility we have is to the taxpayer of Canada who is making the money available on an interest-free basis. These are the two responsibilities members of this House have. Perhaps a third responsibility is to see that the farmer can function in good times and in bad times without too much duress.

The point I should like to make is that if the minister intends to change the operations of the Canadian Wheat Board to the extent they have already been changed and to the extent they are apparently to be changed, then the farmer will not be in a position in which he can be sure he will be able to repay the money and the Canadian Wheat

Prairie Grain Payments Act

Board will not be in a position in which it can be sure that it can recover these payments due. My real fear is that this program which has been excellent, and which has served the people of Canada and the farmers very well, will come into disrepute. That is the real danger. When the minister stood up he made no attempt to tell the House how this legislation could work well under the new pricing and selling methods which will be used in respect of feed grain sales. We must not forget that feed wheat is an integral part of the industry.

This is not only a concern of mine. Other people share this concern, including the government of Manitoba. The minister of agriculture of that province even went to the extent of polling the farmers of Manitoba in order to find out their attitude concerning feed grain marketing. The federal Minister of Agriculture undoubtedly has received opinions from such organizations as the Federation of Agriculture, the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool and the National Farmer's Union. I am sure they told him the same things they told me. They are very concerned about the path he is taking particularly with regard to domestic grain. I am sure they expressed that concern to him as it has been expressed in this House. The minister has chosen to ignore entirely these expressions of concern.

The minister goes on his merry way and winds up making a peroration about what a nice thing it will be when all Canadians lives together in a happy community where momma loves poppa, poppa loves momma and the kids love everybody. That is the sort of dreamland in which the minister is living, but the ordinary producer and farmer must live in the real world where he has not only to borrow money but to repay it. We have not had the answers this afternoon, so I suppose we will not get them. I hope the minister will tell the railroads that branch lines will be in operation soon. It is our hope that he will get them going by June 1.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PRAIRIE GRAIN ADVANCE PAYMENTS ACT
Full View Permalink

May 6, 1974

Mr. Gleave:

The Agricultural Stabilization Act lays on the government and the Minister of Agriculture certain responsibilities in respect of supporting agricultural prices in Canada. What I want to know is when the minister is going to discharge the government's responsibility in this regard?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURE
Full View Permalink

May 6, 1974

Mr. A. P. Gleave (Saskatoon-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, the minister gave us some advance warning that finally he was going to bring some legislation into this House, for on Friday last he issued a whole clutch of news releases. I did not know which was going to come first in his plans, an election or some legislation. This House has been in session during this 29th parliament for close to two years, during which time the minister has changed the direction of the marketing practices of the Canadian Wheat Board for domestic grain, practically without the benefit of legislation. Now that the government stands on the edge of defeat because of its mismanagement of Canadian affairs, its unwillingness to meet the problems of Canadians resulting from the cost of living, and its high-handed action in regard to grain marketing, the government finally brings in some legislation to double the amount of cash advance to farmers in the event that they cannot sell their grain.

Are we being given a preview of the minister's thinking? Is the minister concerned for our future grain sales to the extent that at this point in time he doubles cash advances? Let us remember that this was a measure introduced by a Conservative government, as the minister himself has mentioned, and introduced at a time when grain sales were at a very low ebb. The measure was designed to give some cash flow relief to farmers who at that time were unable to sell enough grain to keep themselves in business.

I wondered why the minister put emphasis on this measure at this time, so I looked at the report in the "Grain Statistics Weekly" put out by the Canadian Grain Commission. In terms of commercial disappearance of domestic and export grain at this point in time, our wheat sales are something over 117 million bushels less than the same time last year. And this, Mr. Speaker, in a crop year that has seen one of the highest world demands and market opportunities for wheat for many a year. The least the minister could have done when he introduced this bill was to explain why, with market conditions as they are at this point in time and with less than three months to the end of the crop year, we are over 117 million bushels short of the sales performance of the Canadian Wheat Board one year ago. That is the result of the minister monkeying around with what was a perfectly good marketing system. He armed himself with a monkey-wrench, a pair of plyers and a bale of haywire and started to work on the marketing machinery. That is the situation we are dealing with now, and primary marketings from farmers are almost in tune with the drop in export sales.

It was in these circumstances that the minister put out a bunch of press releases on Friday in respect of grain stabilization, a farm income package, cash advances, two-price wheat legislation and methods to bring certainty into the timing of final payments and so on. If he gets that all before the House at least maybe there will be some legislative base to work on.

In dealing with this bill I should like to point out one or two things to the House and perhaps to the minister. The

27451-67!

May 6, 1974

Prairie Grain Payments Act

original bill was put in at a time when there was some difficulty with marketing. This kind of legislation depends on two or three basic assumptions, or two or three basic things being in place in the grain marketing industry, without which it will not work. It depends on a quota system that works, and this is pretty important because it is on the basis of a working quota system that a farmer is able to deliver his grain in an orderly fashion, and that the Canadian Wheat Board is sure that repayments can be made. This depends on a price system that works and one that is predictable so the farmer and the Canadian Wheat Board can have confidence in it.

What is the quota system to be in the coming crop year? We just do not know what it is to be. The other day I asked Mr. Jarvis, a witness who appeared before the committee, this question about pricing and the quota system, and he said we would have to wait for another month or two. He is one of the members of the minister's grains group, and that was his answer. How does the minister expect us to be happy with what he is proposing in terms of cash advances when he does not tell us what other packages of goodies he has in his pockets? We do not know what the pricing system is to be. I think the minister has in reality said that the system of pricing on August 1 is to be the Winnipeg commodity exchange. That is what he has been saying to this House, but he has not been able to come out and tell the farmers exactly what he intends to do. Can he not bear to contemplate the results of his handiwork? Are the results going to be so horrible that he will no t be able to contemplate them? Why does he not say what he is going to do? Does he not have the nerve to do so?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PRAIRIE GRAIN ADVANCE PAYMENTS ACT
Full View Permalink

May 6, 1974

Mr. A. P. Gleave (Saskatoon-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, may I put a question to the Minister of Agriculture in respect of hog support prices. In view of the fact the four western provinces and the province of Quebec have found it necessary to support or subsidize hog prices, Saskatchewan to

the extent of almost $23 per hog, what is the policy of the federal government? Is it going to leave the provinces to carry this load or has the minister any policy on this matter?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURE
Full View Permalink