James Garfield GARDINER

GARDINER, The Right Hon. James Garfield, P.C., B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Melville (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
November 30, 1883
Deceased Date
January 12, 1962
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Garfield_Gardiner
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b88f8c1a-3837-4be1-8acb-61fedd1a9cc1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, principal

Parliamentary Career

January 6, 1936 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 4, 1935 - November 14, 1948)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Melville (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 4, 1935 - November 14, 1948)
  • Minister of National War Services (July 12, 1940 - June 10, 1941)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Melville (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 4, 1935 - November 14, 1948)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 15, 1948 - June 20, 1957)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Melville (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 15, 1948 - June 20, 1957)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Melville (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 15, 1948 - June 20, 1957)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
LIB
  Melville (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 15, 1948 - June 20, 1957)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 4153)


February 1, 1958

Mr. Gardiner:

The question under discussion this afternoon has brought up matters which are of great importance not only to the estimates that are being considered at the moment but to the position which an institution of this kind holds among the democratic countries of the world. It is rather important that the occasion is brought about by the fact that it was necessary to find additional money in order to bring people to this country from a country which has suffered from the fact that its people did not have the benefits of democratic government. The money about which we are talking is money which the incoming government thought it would be necessary to vote for the purpose of taking care of additional numbers of Hungarian people who thought this was a good country to which to come because of the experiences we have had in the type of government which has been ours.

I should like to say at the beginning that the basis of all the freedom which we have in this country and which the people in Britain had before us is resting squarely upon the issue which we have been discussing this afternoon, as well as an additional one. The two principles which the common people of Great Britain in the earlier years fought to obtain were first, the right to pass legislation, and second, the right to vote money; that is the right to tax people and the right to vote money as a result of the fact that people had been taxed. That fight takes us back through the whole history with which every school boy and school girl in this country are familiar. That history brings up the most important charters and pieces of legislation that were ever placed upon the statute books. It begins with Magna Carta and it comes through the Declaration of Rights in the day of the struggles that took place during the Stuart period in British history. Then it is associated until the Bill of Rights which was the final act in order to prove

once and for all that the beheading of a king settled something, a matter which was referred to a few moments ago by the Leader of the Opposition. All of these documents which are a part of our history are back of the discussions which we have been having today and the real reason for having certain precedents followed when providing the executive with the people's money.

I want to say to members of this house, some of whom perhaps do not know it, that my experience was similar to that of the hon. member for Peace River. On two different occasions in my political life I have been the treasurer of a province. I have therefore had something to do with votes of this kind and know what is required in connection with them. For that reason I should like to say that the very nature of the house that we have at this time is such that it does not make it easy to carry on the constitution as we have it. Certain things happened early in this session which are of importance in relation to our constitution, but have not been referred to except incidentally in connection with this discussion. It was said by an hon. member a few moments ago that very early in this session,-as a matter of fact in the debate on the address in reply to the speech from the throne-I had occasion to address ideas to this house. They were based upon the very matter that we are now discussing. I have been surprised, as a matter of fact, at the length of time that we have been here- something over three months-before we get right down to discussing the important matters relating to the method under which the government came into being. It brings us back to the fact that at the time we had our election on June 10, which has been referred to over and over again, the people of this country did not make a decision in favour of the government that is sitting on the government benches today. The people of this country gave a majority, in so far as votes were concerned, very much in favour of the party that is sitting as the official opposition as against the Conservative party.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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February 1, 1958

Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner (Melville):

May

I be permitted to say to the minister that the farmers of western Canada, more particularly those in Saskatchewan, who produced considerably more than half of this wheat, will be very much helped by the payment by the wheat board at this time, which I am sure they will greatly appreciate.

Topic:   WHEAT-ANNOUNCEMENT OF INTERIM PAYMENT
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February 1, 1958

Mr. Gardiner:

This is a sample of what is going to have to be said to the people during the next two or three months. Now that a document of this kind has been produced and put on the table of the house, every hon. member who sits on this side of the house from this time on will be able to call on ministers to produce any documents which officials of their departments may have given to them, and put. it on the table, with the result that ministers will get a different kind of advice, or very little advice, from men who are in a position to give good advice. They trusted the ministers to whom they gave that advice would read both sides of the question and reach their own conclusions.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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February 1, 1958

Mr. Gardiner:

If we had joined together, as has been suggested we should have done, and voted them out of office, I do not think the people of this country would have thought that we in the three groups had carried out an undertaking which had been given under the unusual circumstances which existed following that election.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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February 1, 1958

Mr. Gardiner:

I would remind him that they were kept in power and they have not done them.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION
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