George Matheson MURRAY

MURRAY, George Matheson

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Cariboo (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 90 of 91)


October 21, 1949

Mr. G. M. Murray (Cariboo):

Mr. Speaker, I hesitate to say anything at this time as lawyers in the house have had their full say on this matter, but as a humble publisher I thought probably I should interject a word or two. This country is deluged with filth from the publishers of the United States and no effort is made to stop this material coming past the border. We have the right to impose a tariff upon the plates and illustrations and literature generally imported into this country. Unless we do that I think we can expect to continue to pay great profits to the publishers in New York, Chicago and elsewhere.

If one looks at a Canadian paper one will see that at least half of the news content is made up by material from news services originating in New York, Chicago or elsewhere. We have capable journalists in Canada who would be only too glad to write those articles, but apparently it is more desirable to import this material and along with it the so-called pornographic material which has been discussed here tonight.

As a publisher may I say that I do not think we alone are competent to judge what is good or what is bad. That is something for public opinion. We get just what we ask for. You can take the Bible and hold it up as an example of a publication which contains

within it articles and items which might be mentioned here tonight. I think we should encourage our Canadian press, our Canadian writers and our Canadian artists to build a healthy Canadianism. We are cutting ourselves off from the privy council by passing the Supreme Court Act. We could do much more for Canada by establishing a Canadian literature. We must encourage Canadian talent to take such a part in the publication of our papers that it will not be necessary to depend upon writers and artists and syndicates from other lands.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   PORTRAYAL OF CRIMES BY PICTURES IN MAGAZINES, ETC., TENDING TO INDUCE VIOLENCE
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October 21, 1949

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

That is the Montney reserve near the Alaska highway in the neighbourhood of Fort St. John.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   PORTRAYAL OF CRIMES BY PICTURES IN MAGAZINES, ETC., TENDING TO INDUCE VIOLENCE
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October 21, 1949

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

I should like to say a word at this time-

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   PORTRAYAL OF CRIMES BY PICTURES IN MAGAZINES, ETC., TENDING TO INDUCE VIOLENCE
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October 21, 1949

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

I should like to ask the minister if the rights of the soldier settlers at Montney in the Peace river country in British Columbia are being protected with respect to the oil rights on the land which has been taken over from the Indian reserve? There are 38 settlers in the neighbourhood of Fort St. John who have been very profitably settled on the land. The land having been

Supply-Veterans Affairs taken over from an Indian reserve, it carried, of course, the oil and mineral rights. It would only be proper that those rights should go to the returned veterans who have now taken up land and have cultivated it. I understand the department made a deal with the Indians whereby the Indians were given other land back in the mountains suitable for trapping and so forth, in return for this fine agricultural area for soldier settlement which is now being so successfully operated. I may say that oil is being found in that vicinity and it might very well be that these soldiers are in the centre of a great oil basin.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE
Subtopic:   PORTRAYAL OF CRIMES BY PICTURES IN MAGAZINES, ETC., TENDING TO INDUCE VIOLENCE
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October 13, 1949

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

The Fraser river valley, of course. There has been a continuous change in the value of the forest products of this country. Only a few years ago the timber in northern Ontario was regarded as having no commercial value. I can remember when the timber along the Canadian National Railways was not regarded as having any commercial value. Yet within one's lifetime there has been developed one of the greatest pulpwood mills in the world, and it is utilizing timber products which at one time were considered to have no value. This goes on all over the country.

Up in the Peace river country, some of which is in the constituency which I represent, there are stands of trees suitable for saw mill manufacture and possibly the greatest reserves of pulpwood available in this country are to be found along the Peace, Finlay and Mackenzie rivers. There is no doubt that this measure is of the utmost importance to the Dominion of Canada.

Topic:   FOREST PROTECTION AND EXPERIMENT, CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT
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