George Matheson MURRAY

MURRAY, George Matheson

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Cariboo (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 91)


May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

Many a man has been disappointed.

Topic:   CIVIL AVIATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO NEW COMMERCIAL ROUTES IN UNITED STATES
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

I must say that from coast to coast the air facilities are inadequate, and this would apply to every airport from Vancouver right through, Calgary, Malton, Winnipeg and all these various places. There are not sufficient facilities to handle the people who travel by air. We

Supply-Transport

might as well realize that we are in an air age and more room is required. Even at Dorval you find conditions very crowded, with inadequate facilities to handle the great number of people who are constantly passing through.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT OF THE CHIEF JUSTICE OF CANADA, THE SPEAKER OF THE SENATE, THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS AND THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

I think that is a "Socred" smear. No one has travelled more across this country from north to south and east to west than I, and I have never met a waitress or a person serving in our airports who was not courteous, kindly and immaculate in her starched garments.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT OF THE CHIEF JUSTICE OF CANADA, THE SPEAKER OF THE SENATE, THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS AND THE LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

I know that this is the end of this parliament, that shortly the curtain will come down upon this parliament, and a great many splendid things have been done. But how much more happy I would have been if I could have returned to the Peace river country and said that the government of Canada had decided to fling a railroad in there so that those people would have an outlet to their natural markets on the Pacific coast.

I realize that under the chaotic political conditions now existing in British Columbia

we cannot expect the initiative for the construction of this Pacific coast outlet to come from there. 1 know that the minister could easily say that this is primarily a provincial obligation. Northern Alberta and British Columbia are entitled to a Pacific rail outlet. Theoretically at any rate those two provinces are in a position to join forces for the building of that outlet without any assistance from the government of Canada, since there are Social Credit premiers at Victoria and Edmonton. Together they could initiate and carry out the program they have repeatedly promised but which has not been undertaken.

We did get an extension north from Prince George to the Peace river country for which I commend and thank the minister who was associated with the construction of that 80-mile road which was part of the policy of the premier of British Columbia under a Liberal administration. They had promised to construct an outlet into the Peace river country. When they went ahead with that 80-mile road a subsidy was paid by this government with the kind approval and support of the Minister of Transport. I hope that the day will come again in British Columbia when a Liberal government will sit at Victoria and we will be able to continue where we left off in the construction of a rail line into the Peace river valley serving, as I have said, a country larger than western Ontario, a great agricultural country, a country rich in timber resources, coal and other minerals and which has now come into the picture as a great producer of oil and natural gas.

If I am permitted to return to this scene following the next election I hope to come with new vigour and to make a further argument to the minister and those who are associated with him in an effort to convince them that the primary job of the 22nd parliament of Canada should be the development of the Peace river country and the providing of transportation facilities equal to those in Ontario, Manitoba or elsewhere.

Topic:   CIVIL AVIATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO NEW COMMERCIAL ROUTES IN UNITED STATES
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May 12, 1953

Mr. Murray (Cariboo):

It is part of the burden placed upon the people of Canada and I think it should be closely examined. In my own riding we have a real problem in regard to transportation from the Peace river country and northern British Columbia. I know of one farmer who has ten thousand bushels of grain in his granary while farmers right around him secure feed grain from the prairies under this free freight policy. It is just a circle which indicates that this man at McBride, British Columbia, is under a handicap when his neighbours are allowed the benefit of this free freight policy. All of which puts a great burden on the railroads.

Then with regard to the increase in the freight rates, so long as wages continue to go up it is only natural that there will be higher freight rates. But if they go up much higher they will reach a point where the railroads will really begin to suffer. For example, in British Columbia the freight rates have created a sort of tariff, if I may use that word, for the protection of manufacturers on the British Columbia coast. Industry is increasing quite rapidly, as it has around Los Angeles and Seattle. The higher the freight rates the more prosperous will these manufacturers in British Columbia be who are manufacturing the raw materials in order to supply the local market.

I submit that we are handicapped there because of the cost of transportation. I am sure that the minister would be bored if I went over the story of the neglect of the great, wide Peace river country.

Topic:   CIVIL AVIATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO NEW COMMERCIAL ROUTES IN UNITED STATES
Full View Permalink