William Henry (Bill) DOMM

DOMM, William Henry (Bill)

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Peterborough (Ontario)
Birth Date
July 24, 1930
Deceased Date
January 8, 2000
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Domm
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b8477412-c099-4b2b-89a8-94155dd3d914&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
broadcaster, businessman, salesman

Parliamentary Career

May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Peterborough (Ontario)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Peterborough (Ontario)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Peterborough (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs (November 1, 1984 - October 14, 1986)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Peterborough (Ontario)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Science (May 8, 1991 - June 24, 1993)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Science (September 1, 1993 - October 26, 1993)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 180)


June 16, 1993

Mr. Bill Domm (Peterborough):

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present four petitions to the House.

The petitioners humbly pray and call upon Parliament to enact legislation providing for a referendum of the people, binding upon Parliament, to accept or reject two official languages, English and French, for the government and the people of Canada.

The acceptance or rejection of the proposed amendments should be determined by a majority vote of the total votes cast in the whole of Canada, together with a majority vote in a majority of provinces with the territories being given the status of one province.

As in duty bound, your petitioners will ever pray.

Topic:   NATIONAL NEIGHBOURHOOD ACT
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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June 10, 1993

Mr. Bill Domm (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for Science and Minister of State (Small Businesses and Tourism)):

Mr. Speaker, it gives me a great deal of pleasure to answer a question from the Official Opposition when it wants specifics. I wonder how specific it will be in its commitments in the upcoming election.

The government has always made training one of its highest priorities and is committed to helping every Canadian participate in and meet the skill requirements of the labour market both now and in the future.

I know that the Official Opposition does not like statistics but I think if we are going to answer for what we are doing, we need to give specifics.

June 10, 1993

In support of the government I am proud to say that in 1993 for the province of Manitoba alone, almost $130 million has been made available through EIC's programs and services. This will help to ensure that Manitobans can and will gain the training and work experience they need to find lasting and rewarding employment.

In Manitoba, as part of our ongoing priorities for 1993-94, EIC will continue to help laid-off workers through significant labour adjustment measures. We will look to improving access to our funding for aboriginal peoples, through Pathways. We will continue on with the reselection of Community Futures communities.

We recognize that youth unemployment in Manitoba and across this country is at an unacceptable level now. Accordingly this government has a number of programs

Adjournment Debate

available that will help our youth receive the best service possible. Some of EIC's youth initiatives include the Summer Employment/Experience Development, the SEED program; the Stay-in-School, SIS initiative; and the Co-operative Education Program.

In 1993 this government will spend approximately $6 million in Manitoba on the Stay-in-School initiative and SEED which is an increase of approximately $250 million from 1992.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
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June 10, 1993

Mr. Bill Domm (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for Science and Minister of State (Small Businesses and Tourism)):

Mr. Speaker, on March 17, 1993 the Minister of National Defence tabled Canadian forces harassment policy.

This formal policy, aligned with Treasury Board policy, has been in place since 1988. The policy is that harassment in any form, whether personal, sexual or abuse of power, is unacceptable conduct and will not be condoned in the Canadian forces in any way. Our ultimate goal is zero incidents, that is we hope to eliminate harassment entirely.

In follow-up to a commitment made on March 17, 1993 to make available further information regarding the CF and its harassment policy review, the Minister of National Defence tabled a package of documents in the House of Commons. The package tabled on May 5 included a report of the findings of a survey of 5,800 members administered confidentially regarding issues related to harassment policy and its implementation in the CF, and a more general report on the Canadian Forces approach to harassment in the work place.

We are launching an aggressive communication, education and training program to stop harassment before it starts. The CF proposes the creation of a CF harassment program co-ordination office at NDHQ to monitor and track any incidents of harassment, consult with harassment advisers and co-ordinate harassment, education and training programs and materials.

Further, the revisions in the plan are actively being pursued. These initiatives are strong evidence that the CF takes this issue very seriously and is providing leadership and guidance through concrete measures to improve its approach to personal harassment.

June 10, 1993

Adjournment Debate EMPLOYMENT

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
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June 10, 1993

Mr. Bill Domm (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for Science and Minister of State (Small Businesses and Tourism)):

Mr. Speaker, there has been a great deal of uninformed comment on recent events.

It contrasts with the remarkable praise Canadian forces personnel have received elsewhere. They have received praise from a Canadian surgeon working with an American NGO who wants people to know that Canadian troops really did a good job and praise from Somalis who said that Canadians had shown them respect and did not want them to leave.

Yes, there have also been disturbing events. They are being dealt with so let us review what we know of these events and make up our own minds. Each of the four Somali events has been or is being investigated.

In each case the Canadian forces gave public notice of the incident. The details are on public record and were summarized in the minister's statement in the House on April 26, 1993.

June 10, 1993

I would also like to comment on the board of inquiry of the Canadian Airborne Regiment Battle Group which was convened by the chief of defence staff at the minister's request.

As the Minister of National Defence has said, she was confronted by the dual imperative of her responsibility for the management and direction of the Canadian forces on the one hand and on the other her quasi-judicial responsibilities in the military system of justice.

In those roles she has balanced the need to inform the public and Parliament with the need to ensure that the military justice system is not prejudiced. Mindful of her responsibility she sought advice on how best to address a variety of concerns and directed the chief of the defence staff to convene a board of inquiry.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   ARMED FORCES
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June 3, 1993

Mr. Bill Domm (Parliamentary Secretary to Minister for Science and Minister of State (Small Businesses and Tourism)):

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to respond to the questions brought before this House by the hon. member.

The Minister of National Health and Welfare is on record in this House as saying that he will enforce the Canada Health Act and impose dollar for dollar financial penalties on any province in which patients are being extra billed for necessary medical services.

The Canada Health Act recognizes that it is our provincial and territorial governments that are responsible for determining how our health care services are to be delivered and financed. The act does not give the federal minister the power to stop extra billing in any province or territory. However it does give the minister the authority to withhold a portion of federal transfer payments for health from the province in which the extra

June 3, 1993

billing is occurring. This reduction in federal contributions serves as a disincentive to the practice of extra billing.

The Canada Health Act defines extra billing as charges to a patient for an insured health service in an amount that exceeds the provincial health plan payment. The act requires the cash health transfer payment to the province to be reduced by an amount equal to the amount of the extra billing occurring in the province. In other words, for each dollar of extra billing a dollar is deducted. However we must be sure before we decide to withhold any transfer funds.

The minister is very concerned about the possibility of some British Columbia physicians charging extra fees for insured services. Such fees would leave patients having to pay out of their own pockets when they have already paid for health care services through their taxes.

The fees would also represent a financial barrier to

Adjournment Debate

some patients seeking or receiving needed medical care. This is something that goes against the principles upon which our health care system is based.

In conclusion, this government is opposed strongly to extra billing in principle and in practice. The minister is prepared to use his authority under the Canada Health Act and respond accordingly if any legitimate threat in the form of extra billing occurs.

That investigation to assure the hon. member is currently in process and it is the intent of the minister to deal with it in the way he sees fit in the event the member's claims are found to be true.

Topic:   PROCEEDINGS ON ADJOURNMENT MOTION
Subtopic:   HEALTH CARE
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