Judy WASYLYCIA-LEIS

WASYLYCIA-LEIS, Judy, B.A., M.A.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Winnipeg North (Manitoba)
Birth Date
August 10, 1951
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judy_Wasylycia-Leis
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b8338fd5-94de-48ce-971f-e4fc26d1575f&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
organizer, policy adviser

Parliamentary Career

June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
NDP
  Winnipeg North Centre (Manitoba)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
NDP
  Winnipeg North Centre (Manitoba)
  • N.D.P. Deputy Caucus Chair (January 1, 2003 - July 1, 2004)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
NDP
  Winnipeg North (Manitoba)
  • N.D.P. Deputy Caucus Chair (January 1, 2003 - July 1, 2004)
  • N.D.P. Caucus Chair (August 1, 2004 - January 19, 2009)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
NDP
  Winnipeg North (Manitoba)
  • N.D.P. Caucus Chair (August 1, 2004 - January 19, 2009)
October 14, 2008 - April 30, 2010
NDP
  Winnipeg North (Manitoba)
  • N.D.P. Caucus Chair (August 1, 2004 - January 19, 2009)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 368)


March 31, 2010

Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased and honoured to present a petition signed by many people from Manitoba who are very concerned about funding for the healing programs under the Aboriginal Healing Foundation. They are very worried because that funding comes to an end today.

However, they hold up great hope and they call on the government to think twice, to think with great compassion and understanding of the predicament of aboriginal people, especially those who went through the residential school system.

The petitioners are pleased that our colleague from Churchill and the New Democratic caucus were able to organize an emergency debate in the House just last evening to bring pressure to bear on the government. However, they want to add their voice to all the hundreds of others who have signed petitions to plead with the government to restore funding and ensure that the Aboriginal Healing Foundation is able to continue.

I especially want to note the impact that these cuts will have on organizations in my constituency, including the Manitoba Métis Federation and the Native Addictions Council of Manitoba. Both organizations provide critical services to people who have been through the worst imaginable horrors in going through the residential school system, losing a sense of identity and trying to bring some normalcy back to their lives. They depend on organizations like this one.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   Petitions
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March 31, 2010

Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, the insincerity of the Conservatives' commitment to battling AIDS has reached new depths. We are now hearing that the government is planning to cut $10 million as of today in funding for the international initiative, something former UN AIDS envoy Stephen Lewis has called unconscionable.

After it broke its promise to build an HIV vaccine facility, which many suspect for good reason was the result of political interference, we had hoped it would at least keep its promise to use the money for HIV programs like AIDS vaccine. Will the government restore funding for the AIDS vaccine initiative and—

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Foreign Affairs
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March 31, 2010

Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, today members of all political parties are joining together to support Prostate Cancer Canada's campaign to unite Canadians in the fight against prostate cancer, the most common cancer among Canadian men. This year's campaign has taken on a special significance for many of us in the House because prostate cancer has entered the life of one of our own, my leader, the hon. member for Toronto—Danforth.

The NDP leader has chosen to share his personal battle with us. His decision has raised people's awareness of this disease.

He is making a conscious effort to dispel the myths about this cancer that often prevent men from acting in a timely way to monitor their prostate health. While one in every six Canadian men will develop prostate cancer, early detection and treatment has cut the mortality rate to one in every 27 patients.

The member for Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier has proven that this disease can be defeated. Tomorrow is the first day of April, which is cancer month. Let us unite to fight prostate cancer.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Prostate Cancer
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March 18, 2010

Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, tuberculosis rates among aboriginal Canadians are skyrocketing at levels higher than many third world countries. This is a national emergency that needs an urgent plan of action and yet the government has no plan, not even on first nations reserves for which it has clear constitutional responsibility.

Can anyone imagine that Inuit TB rates are 185 times the national average and the Minister of Health, the member for Nunavut, is not even raising an eyebrow, all the while trying to slough the responsibility off onto provinces and territories? Aboriginal TB rates are 51 times the general public and yet the government refuses to pay for X-rays to test residents on reserves like Garden Hill in Manitoba. TB is a treatable disease but Canadian lives are still being lost.

However, members do not need take it from me. They need only look at the research and the recent award-winning Winnipeg Free Press series by Jen Skerritt and follow up by reporter Mia Rabson. TB is called ”the forgotten disease”. It certainly has been forgotten by the government and that must end today.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Tuberculosis
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March 15, 2010

Ms. Judy Wasylycia-Leis (Winnipeg North, NDP)

Mr. Speaker, I will be sharing my time with my colleague, the member for Sudbury.

We join today with all Canadians in acknowledging and celebrating our Paralympics athletic achievement and abilities. These games spotlight our athletes' will to overcome enormous obstacles to contribute their talents and abilities at an internationally competitive level.

With the games opening ceremonies attracting a packed house of 60,000 last Friday at B.C. Place, clearly the message went out to the world, “We have arrived”. These Paralympics will see 1,350 athletes from 44 countries compete in 64 events.

Look how far we have come from the first winter games in 1976 when we had 12 countries competing. At those games, Canada was represented by six athletes. Today, the number is 55. As has been noted in the House already, we have had three silver medallists, Colette Bourgonje, Josh Dueck and Viviane Forest and now today Canada's first gold medallist, Brian McKeever, for his 20K in cross country.

The 2010 Paralympic Games and the way they are being promoted do not come close to the 1976 games, but we still have time to make up for it.

Many Canadians expected to watch the opening ceremonies live, but only a few of us, those living in British Columbia, had that privilege. However, had they been broadcast, that would have sent a clear message about our values of equality. Unfortunately, we were not up to the challenge and we missed out on an excellent opportunity that will not come around again any time soon.

The problems with captioning of the online broadcast of the games and the lack of accessibility at some of the facilities have also been criticized.

I can only hope that these basic issues will be corrected by the next games.

Today, we are also celebrating an achievement on another front in the struggle for an inclusive and accessible Canada. In December the House of Commons unanimously passed my motion urging the government to ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities before the Paralympics began.

Last Thursday, on the eve of the games, Canada did just that and became the 78th country to ratify the convention. We can now celebrate the Paralympic games without questions about our commitment to equal rights hanging over us. Although it took seven years to get us here, we can now say equivocally that there is a strong consensus in Canada, both here in Parliament and outside, behind the convention and its principles and clear responsibilities at all levels of government to follow through with action.

This marks a major and meaningful achievement for the disability community in Canada. I want to acknowledge the instrumental role played by the Council of Canadians with Disabilities and the Canadian Association for Community Living in moving Canada's commitment to the convention forward. They have spearheaded an effort over the years that of course received the active support of other advocacy groups such as Independent Living Canada, People First of Canada, Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians and Canadian Association of the Deaf, to name just a few.

We now have a framework through which Canadians living with disabilities can work to achieve equality, equality that is now a matter of right not benevolence or charity. Moreover, there are very clear measures for gauging our progress.

There is much work left to be done. When the Paralympic flame is extinguished, the 12% of Canadians living with disabilities still face unacceptable barriers to daily living and participating as equals in Canada's social, economic and cultural life.

Today, we stand to show our commitment that through these games and the signing of this convention, we will work to ensure full equality. This is a true cause for celebration.

Topic:   Routine Proceedings
Subtopic:   2010 Paralympic Winter Games
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