Angus MACINNIS

MACINNIS, Angus

Personal Data

Party
Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)
Constituency
Vancouver Kingsway (British Columbia)
Birth Date
September 2, 1884
Deceased Date
March 3, 1964
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angus_MacInnis
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b8094e9f-95f3-46b2-ab3e-9e132f32ed9e&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
motorman, unionist

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
IND
  Vancouver South (British Columbia)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
CCF
  Vancouver East (British Columbia)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
CCF
  Vancouver East (British Columbia)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
CCF
  Vancouver East (British Columbia)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
CCF
  Vancouver East (British Columbia)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
CCF
  Vancouver Kingsway (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 1083)


June 20, 1955

Mr. Angus Maclnnis (Vancouver-Kingsway):

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am glad to be back. As far as I am concerned this is home.

Topic:   WELCOME TO HON. MEMBER FOR VANCOUVER-KINGSWAY ON HIS RETURN FOLLOWING ILLNESS
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March 8, 1955

Mr. Angus Maclnnis (Vancouver-Kingsway):

Mr. Speaker, members of the Senate, members of the House of Commons, relatives and friends of Agnes Macphail: I consider it a distinct privilege to have the opportunity today of taking part in this ceremony. It was my good fortune to know and work with

Agnes Macphail for a period of more than 20 years, for 10 years in this house and for more than 10 years outside this house.

Although Agnes Macphail was the first woman member elected to this house, I am convinced that she was not elected because she was a woman. I am glad this is the case. I am certain that the hard-headed and practical farmers of Grey county had no such romantic or chivalrous ideas in mind when they elected Miss Macphail to parliament. They elected her because she was interested in and understood their problems. They knew she would devote her energies to trying to find a solution to those problems, and they were not disappointed.

Agnes Macphail was not, however, a person with only one interest, important as that interest was and, perhaps, claimed her first attention. She was a person of warm human sympathies. She was anxious that everyone should have the opportunity to make the best of his or her life. In this house she pleaded for better social services, pensions for the aged, the blind and the disabled, and for a greater interest in education. More than anyone else in the house at that time, and indeed perhaps more than anyone else in the country, she was responsible for the appointment of the Archambault commission on penal reform. Consequently she was responsible for the beneficial results which have flowed from the recommendations of that commission.

Her wide human sympathy was never better illustrated than during her first term in parliament when, although she was representing farmers in Ontario she made a visit to Cape Breton to look into the plight of the coal miners and their families who were suffering intensely in the Glace Bay area, at a time when that subject was being aired in this house.

As has already been said, Agnes Macphail was an able parliamentarian. When she spoke she was always given the attention of this house, not because she was a woman and the male members were anxious to be on their good behaviour, but because she always had something worth while to say and she said it in a striking manner.

I am glad today on behalf of the group with which I am associated in this house to have the opportunity of paying tribute to one who will always be remembered not only as the first woman member of this house but as a great humanitarian and an outstanding Canadian.

Topic:   APPENDIX
Subtopic:   AGNES CAMPBELL MACPHAIL
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March 8, 1955

Mr. Maclnnis:

Generosity.

Topic:   BROADCASTING
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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March 8, 1955

Mr. Maclnnis:

I was wondering what the business would be for tomorrow, Mr. Speaker. I realize that according to our order paper tomorrow is private members' day. According to my memory, a week ago tonight we were debating the question of unemployment. At that time it was thought the matter was so urgent and so important that we should continue the debate the next day, which was also a private members' day. We obtained the unanimous consent of the house to do that.

If unemployment was an urgent and important matter a week ago, I think it is equally so tonight. I think by unanimous consent we should proceed tomorrow with the debate on the motion to go into supply and the amendment on unemployment, in order to try to put the government in a position where they may be able to do something with regard to the present unemployment situation. I suggest we have an opportunity to get the views of hon. members on that matter.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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March 8, 1955

Mr. Maclnnis:

May I suggest that it is not necessary to make a decision on whether we

are ready to give up the last private members' day. All we have to do is be ready to give up tomorrow, and let the other private members' day after that take care of itself.

Topic:   L844 HOUSE OF COMMONS
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