Stan DARLING

DARLING, Stan

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
Birth Date
July 16, 1911
Deceased Date
April 11, 2004
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Darling
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b7f39a72-55df-48bd-acff-73eeb8fe2318&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
insurance broker, realtor

Parliamentary Career

October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 252 of 252)


February 27, 1973

Mr. Darling:

There has been some doubt expressed as to the wisdom of removing the 11 per cent tax on building supplies. Some hon. members feel that such a measure would provide little relief for the lower income groups. It is true that outside of pure Marxism, equity is an elusive quarry. Nevertheless, repeal of the 11 per cent building supply tax would represent a significant reduction in the final price of a home and allow many more Canadians to own their own home. Apart from the obvious social benefit, a stimulus in the order of $365 million would be injected into the economy. This stimulus, in conjunction with increased sales of building materials and related products, would serve both to boost this sector of the business community and to increase employment in all facets of the housing industry.

At the same time, this policy would serve to dampen the wage demands of workers who have come to view their jobs as uncertain and demand wage rates to compensate for their seasonal nature. This aspect of many of our

February 27, 1973

T7ie Budget-Mr. M. Roy

industries is a prime contributor to our high unemployment rates, inflationary tendencies and outsized Unemployment Insurance Commission payments. In this light, elimination of the 11 per cent tax on building supplies would be a significant step toward a sound economic and a more equitable distribution of funds for all income groups.

I believe I have gone over my time, Mr. Speaker, and I thank you for the consideration shown to me.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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February 27, 1973

Mr. Darling:

All right. Call them what you will, city states, super cities or provinces, these concentrated concrete jungles will have 90 per cent of our population and as much or more of its wealth. The other area or province will be the entire balance of our country and could be named Canada. Let me say a word about redistribution. If we still have the same number of members in this House, those areas will be represented by 238 members and all the rest of Canada by 27.

Something has to be done, Mr. Speaker, to keep people in the rural areas and in towns and villages and to stop this erosion of population to the cities. The top priorities are, as I said before, jobs, housing and control of inflation. In rural Canada today our chief export and most valuable commodity is our young people. We pay to raise and educate them, and then they leave for the great rat race in the monster cities. In recent years some cities have had a twinge of conscience and are now willing to repay us by sending us, in return, their garbage. This pattern of growth means declining populations. It means the underuse of existing local and municipal services. It means an erosion of the municipal tax base. It means under-used school facilities. Something must be done to halt this and provide a way of life to the many people who want to remain in the regions where they were born and raised.

The backbone of the rural areas across our country is the small businessman and enterpreneur who is having a hard job getting by, in making a comfortable living, and who is paying the high wages now demanded and the many other high costs. He is also in a very serious financial position during certain periods of the year. In our particular area, where the economy is buoyant in the summer season, the lean months in the winter eat up the profits and he must borrow money at the bank and pay, in many cases, high interest rates. I feel that low interest rates should be available to these hard working and enterprising citizens who provide the great majority of employment in the many small villages and towns scattered throughout our country.

We have heard much said, Mr. Speaker, during the present session regarding the high water problem in the

The Budget-Mr. Darling

Great Lakes. The entire western boundary of my riding borders on Georgian Bay, and the high water is certainly a serious problem to many tourist and marine operators, as well as to cottagers. They have suffered considerable financial loss. I am hoping that this government will have sufficient funds set aside for emergencies so that it can make a worth-while contribution in conjunction with the province of Ontario.

Let me say a word about the LIP program, Mr. Speaker.

I am aware that the money has now been overspent and a great many applications turned down, some of them very worthy. Having served as a member of a municipal government for a long period, it is my opinion that top priority should have been given to all applications submitted by municipal governments before projects submitted by private individuals or other organizations were considered. If money was left over, it could then have been divided among such individuals or organizations. It is my considered opinion that the elected officials of municipalities know their needs far greater than any individual or organization in the area. I will concede that many worthwhile ones were approved.

I trust that all members of the House who represent constituencies on our coast will pay particular attention to this: they have been daily making life miserable and have been badgering the Minister of Transport (Mr. Marchand) for the tabling of the long-awaited document known as the Darling report. Here it is, Mr. Speaker, and I am sure they will all be delighted with it.

I would be remiss if I did not indicate my pleasure at being able to sit in a parliament with so many colleagues from the Progressive Conservative party. At the same time, I would like to convey my respects to the Prime Minister (Mr. Trudeau). Although my colleagues and I may take exception to many of his policies, it is in keeping with the intended spirit of our parliamentary system that when he speaks we afford him the respect due Canada's first minister. I certainly take exception to the way he has been treated time and again.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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February 27, 1973

Mr. Stan Darling (Parry Sound-Muskoka):

Mr. Speaker, at long last, after listening to my colleagues on this side and to other members I have a chance to say a few words. This is my maiden speech, Mr. Speaker, so I would like to begin by congratulating Your Honour on your appointment for another term to the post of Speaker of the House. I would also like to congratulate my colleague, the hon. member for Halifax-East Hants (Mr. McCleave) on his appointment as Deputy Speaker and Chairman of Committees of the Whole House.

May I at this time say I am proud to represent the riding of Parry Sound-Muskoka and to have been selected to follow Mr. Gordon Aiken, Q.C., who was an outstanding member of this House for 15 years.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
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