Stan DARLING

DARLING, Stan

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
Birth Date
July 16, 1911
Deceased Date
April 11, 2004
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Darling
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=b7f39a72-55df-48bd-acff-73eeb8fe2318&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
insurance broker, realtor

Parliamentary Career

October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Parry Sound--Muskoka (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 251 of 252)


March 12, 1973

1. Has the Department of Veterans Affairs received applications from veterans for assistance under the Veterans' Land Act who failed to file for certificates before the deadline had passed?

2. Approximately how many applications have been received that had to be rejected because the veterans failed to file before the deadline had passed?

3. Does the Minister plan to initiate action to extend the deadline to accommodate veterans who would now like to acquire small holdings, but who failed to apply for certificates of eligibility before the deadline?

Hon. Daniel ]. MacDonald (Minister of Veterans Affairs): 1 and 2. When it is ascertained that the veteran does not have a valid Certificate of Qualification, no application for financial assistance under Part I of the Veterans' Land Act is submitted. Records have not been maintained as to the number of veterans who have contacted VLA offices since October 31, 1968, who did not obtain a Certificate of Qualification by that date.

3. Any such action would be a matter of government policy and would be announced in the usual way.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
Full View Permalink

March 12, 1973

Mr. Stan Darling (Parry Sound-Muskoka):

Mr. Speaker, despite the many plans to reduce unemployment outlined by the government in the various programs it has put forward, as well as in the budget, unemployment is still with us and rearing its ugly head as high as ever.

Many of us are aware that a small percentage have unlawfully milked the unemployment insurance fund. It is only right and just that they should be ferreted out and brought to task. However, in doing so many legitimate claims have either been delayed or stopped, causing severe hardship to families in dire need, especially at this time of year. The skyrocketing price of food has added to the misery of those in need.

I read recently the report of the Minister of Industry, Trade and Commerce (Mr. Gillespie) who stated that one-third of the families in rural Canada live in poverty. He quoted Statistics Canada as stating that 32 per cent of families in rural areas in 1971, the last year for which statistics are available, had incomes below the so-called low income line. The figure for 1969 was 36 per cent. While the situation has improved slightly for families, for unattached individuals it is even worse. Of such individuals, 56.1 per cent were below the low income line of $2,013 in 1971, while 50.4 per cent were below the 1969 line of $1,894. It is up to us to try to find jobs for these people so they may regain their self-respect.

We hear about pockets of poverty and disparity throughout this great country. Some planners have suggested that the people to whom I have referred be uprooted and moved to urban areas to find work. These people do not want to leave their homes and friends to live in concrete jungles. Furthermore, this is no solution as it would aggravate the urban housing problem, where land is at a premium, and any new housing would be beyond their means. Surely a more sensible and cheaper plan would be to provide jobs in rural Canada.

The Minister of Regional Economic Expansion (Mr. Jamieson) could come to the fore in this regard by giving us the suggestions which I understand will be forthcoming to provide new guidelines which I hope will bring in new areas of rural Canada which are no longer eligible. I can certainly speak with some authority on this matter because in my own region of Parry Sound-Muskoka the economic situation is very poor and we are no longer designated. Instead of hearing about the Minister of State for Urban Affairs, it is about time something was done to change this title or create a new minister of rural affairs. We always hear about the great cities. It is about time somebody spoke up for rural Canada.

March 12, 1973

Unemployment

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
Full View Permalink

March 12, 1973

Mr. Darling:

This particular time of year, with what seems to be the spring breakup at hand, is the most serious for high unemployment in my constituency. I am quite sure the same situation prevails in a great many other rural constituencies. Lumbering in the bush is finished; tourist operators who cater to snowmobilers will not have any more visitors until the fishing season opens.

I checked with the Parry Sound office today. I was told that there are over 900 on the unemployment rolls. The total population of the area is quite small. There is a real problem there with girls-and I do not mean in the way some people might think. There is a problem of providing jobs for the female population. I am told that some did accept work outdoors, cutting and piling brush. They are to be commended for this; it shows the type of energetic people there are in my constituency. If the local Manpower authorities were given discretionary power to work out some plan with tourist operators and service industries whereby these girls could be paid part unemployment insurance benefits, and the employer part, they would be hired ahead of time to fix up tourist establishments, painting and for other things. Everyone would benefit. It could be said that we would be subsidizing an employer and he would be paying less than the minimum wage, but surely something could be done about this. The local Manpower office could have authority to investigate these cases and to ensure there were not any abuses.

I am aware that the Minister of Manpower and Immigration (Mr. Andras) has a tough job. I listened to his remarks. He is to be commended for doing a pretty good job, but he has to sell more than himself. I remember seeing a movie many years ago; I think it was entitled "The Unholy Three". I suggest that the three who are holding up a great deal of the growth in rural Canada are the following: the Minister of Finance (Mr. Turner), the Minister of Regional Economic Expansion and the Minister of State for Urban Affairs. If these three could be sold the idea of disgorging some of their untold millions to provide jobs and industry in rural Canada, it would greatly help the unemployment problem. It would also help the large cities, because they do not want more people looking for jobs.

I understand I have another two minutes, Mr. Speaker. I will let someone else use them. We all know the problem: we all see the headlines which state that the number one target is jobs. The real issue is jobs. The lists of jobless soar; that is the problem in a nutshell. We require more jobs, particularly in rural Canada.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
Full View Permalink

March 12, 1973

Mr. Darling:

It is in this area that the economy needs to be bolstered. There is no problem of land banks being needed in these areas to try to assemble land: there is all sorts of land. What they need are regular banks which will provide funds for jobs, housing, small industry, and so on. This is a must. This would keep our people in familiar surroundings where they are much happier. More jobs would be provided by our many businessmen as increases in sales and services warranted.

This morning I heard His Worship Mayor Drapeau on television giving a patriotic pitch for the great city of Montreal. He stated at the top of his voice, "We are number one". However, it was pointed out to him that number two was breathing hotly down his back and that the great city of Toronto would probably be passing Montreal before very long. The mayor said everything indicates that the people are leaving rural Canada and are heading to the big cities. The federal and provincial governments must take steps to stop the steady migration to our larger cities.

The many land controls are hurting small municipalities the most, much more than the larger cities. Little or no building is allowed, because it does not conform to the master plan. As a result, many small contractors and carpenters are sitting around doing nothing. Their employees are drawing unemployment insurance. All this is because they cannot get their lots approved. The situation would be much easier if these lots were approved. They are satisfactory in all respects; however, they are held up by government red tape, planners and civil servants some of whom are neither civil nor servants.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
Full View Permalink

February 27, 1973

Mr. Stan Darling (Parry Sound-Muskoka):

Mr. Speaker, at long last, after listening to my colleagues on this side and to other members I have a chance to say a few words. This is my maiden speech, Mr. Speaker, so I would like to begin by congratulating Your Honour on your appointment for another term to the post of Speaker of the House. I would also like to congratulate my colleague, the hon. member for Halifax-East Hants (Mr. McCleave) on his appointment as Deputy Speaker and Chairman of Committees of the Whole House.

May I at this time say I am proud to represent the riding of Parry Sound-Muskoka and to have been selected to follow Mr. Gordon Aiken, Q.C., who was an outstanding member of this House for 15 years.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Full View Permalink